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clarifying stock

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi

I notice in a number of recipes regarding the subject that they require some form of meat/poultry along with the usual egg whites, carrots onions all blended. Is this really necessary or is it just for flavour enhancing..I ask also because I am about to clarify some lobster stock..not crazy about putting 8 oz of tail meat in just for MORE flavour LOL

Thanks

Ski Break
post #2 of 15
IMHO, if you've made the stock from the lobster shells, you do not need to augment the flavor with additional protein, the flavor comes from the shells.
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #3 of 15
The additional meat and vegetables are primarily used for adding flavour and to give something for the raft to cling on to, you don't need to use lobster meat in the clarification, but if you save a few shells and make less liquid then you can still add flavour.

Also consider using gelatin filtration... add about 1% in weight of the gelatin to your stock, then freeze. Afterwards allow it to melt and drain over a mesh sieve in the fridge for a night or two, you will get the clearest, most intense tasting consomme. Freeze in a wide/shallow container to get it to drip a little faster.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #4 of 15
Clarify?

Here's an "easy way":
Make the clearest stock you can, chill overnight. Next day carefully move the container to the freezer and stick a spoon or something in it.

When it's frozen, put the container in a bucket of hot water, and pull out the stock like a popsicle. Put a soup pot on the stove, and put the popsickle in the pot. All the sediment in the stock has settled to the bottom, what you wnat to do now is to remove that sediment, melt it off, and put the popsickle bck into it's container to melt again--this time without the sediment.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 15
If you are talking the clarrification of a stock, no you need not do this. However if you are making a classic consomme it is.:chef:
CHEFED
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post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

clarifying stock

Thanks everyone ! The lobster tail ref was sort of a joke...anyway much appreciated and yes Chef ED I was going the consomme route...

a bientot at bon appetit

SB
post #7 of 15
ooh, Blueicus, thanks for posting that.

I always use geletin to clear in the final stages of brewing beer and I never fail at that... yet every time I have tried to clear a stock or make consomme I end up having to pass the lot through a lined sieve to get the little bits of the raft out.

I'll try it your way, right after I give myself a smack in the forehead for not thinking of it myself :blush:
post #8 of 15
Mix egg whites with chopped veges. and ice cubes. the colder the better put in ice cold stock then simmer DO NOT BOIL and DO NOT STIR. If you have a pot with a spigot on bottom thats ideal. if not take clear stock out carefully with a ladel.:chef:
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post #9 of 15
Ah, there's where I've been going wrong. I never iced the clearmeat, and I always started with a semi-warm stock (not hot enough to cook the egg, but still) Someone told me to be sure to scrape the bottom of the pot while it came up to a simmer so the clearmeat wouldn't stick. :/

So, I will wave goodbye to the way I have been trying, and go again properly this time. Thanks Ed :)
post #10 of 15
if this recipe you speak of requires clarified stock for a sauce of some kind you shouldn't worry too much about the clarifying process, because you are probably going to add other ingredients to thicken and flavour it anyway.

clarifying stock is basically a process of straining the cooking liquid through a double muslin and skimming off the fat that comes to rest on the top.

if it's a consomme that you are making there should be no other ingredients for the recipe than for making the consomme itself, simple as.
we're as good as our last meal.
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we're as good as our last meal.
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post #11 of 15
Is this Raft absolutely necessary or is it something I can simply filter through a fine cloth/sieve?

I got an off topic question
When making stocks I've read that you must never cover the pot otherwise it will build up acid. I usually just chuck my stuff in a pot and when it starts boiling I put it in a thermos . Mainly because it 1) save power 2) I don't like the idea of leaving something simmering away for 6-8 hours unattended or having to be close by to keep an eye on it... I've also heard that if you just let it simmer at the end for 15 minutes the acid will go away.

Another Question
Is adding salt a must to a stock to extract flavor or is there little or no difference compared to adding the salt after?
post #12 of 15
For a traditional consomme a raft is very useful for flavouring and for picking up the various pieces of debris that exists in your stock, you lose a lot of flavour in the process of rafting so it is always useful to add some back in. With gelatin filtration the process is slower, but you will get a product that is clearer than anything you can do with a raft and will have a more intense flavour even without adding additional product, though you will lose all of the gelatin that you extracted from the stock. Also you have to be careful about the concentration of gelatin, if you have too much you may find that you'll get very little out of it.

I've never noticed a difference in adding salt earlier or later... it all tastes the same to me. Also, if you add too much salt in the beginning you run the risk of oversalting it when you try to reduce it.

Never heard anything about the acid problem... where exactly will this acid come from? I also doubt that 15 minutes of simmering could remove any significant amount of acid.

Given a sufficiently fine filter you can clarify any liquid... of course you will need a specialty filter and not something like a coffee filter. It will also take a long time to clarify your liquid.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #13 of 15
Well my guess, is the proteins in the meat which are made of amino acids have some of it's chemical structure broken down into potentially stronger acids.Just something I'd ask peoples opinions about since even Julia Child's mentions this in her book.
post #14 of 15
It does add lots of flavor to your recipe. Its a good choice to add it.
post #15 of 15
Instead of lobster meat , roast the shells and chop them in food processor, Then treat them like meat , you will need to add more egg whites than the recipe calls for because that is what forms your raft which floats up and clarify's everything.
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