or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Buckwheat Groats

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I saw this recipe for Kasha in the current edition of Bon Appetite which sounded quite tasty. It is basically made from buckwheat groats cooked in liquid (sorta like cooking rice) and mixed with onions and wild mushrooms.

Knowing the rich, earthy taste you get from buckwheat crepes I was anticipating something similar here but instead the groats were bland almost to the point of being tasteless.

That's the first time I've cooked buckwheat groats. Is that the best I can expect from them?
post #2 of 12
You mean this recipe?

Procedure looks okay: always toast the groats before adding the liquid; this adds a nice toastiness and heightens the flavor.

But where's the salt? :confused: :eek: If you used a low-salt veg broth and didn't add any salt (none is called for), well, yes, it will lack flavor. :( The recipe on the package of medium kasha calls for 1/4 to 1/2 tsp salt for 1 cup kasha, 1 egg, and 2 cups liquid. That works fine for me.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #3 of 12
Although not shown in the ingredient list, the final paragraph of the recipe called for seasoning with salt and pepper. Did you?

Even if you did, kasha needs to be heavily seasoned with both or it will be, as you say, quite bland. The two bring out the essential nuttiness of the groats, but without them the kasha will be mealy. In this case white pepper may work even better than black.

In addition, if you're using a commercially prepared stock, the kasha would improve with the substitution of chicken or beef stock for the specified vegetable stock. As a class, prepared vegetable stocks also tend to be bland.

Hope this helps,
BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #4 of 12
The recipe won't open for me, but did it call for toasting the groats? That's what makes it kasha.

Way I learned from my mama was to mix the toasted groats with a beaten egg and cook that in a dry pan until the egg was fully absorbed. Then add whatever other ingredients are going into it---which always includes salt and pepper.

Toasted buckwheat should bring a nutty, earthy flavor to the dish. But it's mostly a stage to support the other flavors.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #5 of 12
The Bon Appetit recipe called for mixing the egg into the groats, then toasting. That's the same way I learned from my Grandma Elsie. I know some people toast before and after adding the egg and expect each way is good.

BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks all. I did toast the groats with the egg first. Boxed veggie stock - hmmmm! Seasoning?? You know? I don't actually remember. Anyway, as ever very insightfull feedback. I'll have another crack at it because I like the idea of the dish.
post #7 of 12

Thanks for the input

I've never made kasha before, so thanks for all the input for when I try!
post #8 of 12
You know, kasha is one of those ingredients that is very common in central and eastern Europe, but which, with the exception of one ethnic group, never caught on here in the States. But it deserves broader exposure, because it's a very versitile grain.

For instance, this recipe from Carol Gelles' Wholesome Harvest:

Kashka and Cauliflower

2 tbls oil
1 cup cauliflower florets
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1/2 cup coarsely shredded carrot
3 tbls water
1 cup cooked kasha
1/3 cup golden raisins

In a large skillet heat the oil over medium high heat. Add the cauliflower, mushrooms, and carrot. Cook, stirring, until the mushrooms are soft. Add the water and cook, stirring, until evaporated. Add the kasha and raisins, and cook, stirring, until heated through.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #9 of 12
Well, I'm part of that ethnic group ;) (actually, there are several :) ) and I grew up eating kasha. I can never understand why other people don't love it as much as I do. "Too strong a flavor" is the usual negative reaction. Huh? :confused: That's what's so good about it!

Sorry if the link didn't work. It's from the February 2010 Bon Appétit, Wild Mushroom and Onion Kasha: Recipe : bonappetit.com

If you just make some basic kasha (mix 1 cup with 1 egg, toast in a dry saucepan stirring frequently, add 2 cups liquid, cover, and cook over gentle heat until all the liquid is absorbed), you've got a way to make many, many dishes. One of the favorites of my youth is to mix it with lots of fried onions and cooked bow-tie macaroni -- and lots and lots of fat -- for kasha varnishkes, a real heart stopper. :lol: Classic fat is chicken (schmaltz), but I've used butter and duck fat, and both are good, too. Plus I get to use up leftover bow-ties.

And kasha works for a stuffing/dressing, in fact just about any dish where you might use cooked rice. Just remember to salt it, because it does need seasoning.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #10 of 12
Kasha Varnishkes is, of course, the classic, Suzanne. We had it often, growing up, especially with my mom's pot roast---of which the world has never seen the equal. :talk:

I do a variation that, as it turns out, is similar to the Bon Appetite recipe, except mine is saucier.

Kasha with Mushroom Onion Sauce

1 cup cooked kasha
1/2 cup cooked bowtie pasta (small preferred)
3 tbls sesame oil
2 cups mushrooms, thinly sliced
1 1/2 cups onion, thinkly sliced
1 1/2 cups chicken stock
Salt & pepper to taste
1 1/2 tbls arrowroot
2 tbls tamari or other soy sauce

Saute mushrooms until they are golden brown. Add onions and continue cooking until they take on some color. Add stock to pan and reduce slightly.

Make a paste with the tamari and arrowroot. Add to pan, stirring, until sauce thickens. Mix the sauce with the kasha and bowties.

Mushrooms and kasha seem to have a natural affinity for each other. Probably 2/3 of the recipes I have for kasha include mushrooms.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #11 of 12
Read what Kyheirloomer wro. His way is correct. In Kosher Catering Kasha and varnishkas was a staple on the smorgasbord. Bow tie pasta mixed with the roasted highly seasoned kash (made like a Pilaff) and served with a rich heavy brown mushroom sauce. If you did not have this , It was not a real Bar Mitzvah or wedding.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #12 of 12
Im thinking of looking for the recipe now Im so excited to taste it!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking