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Pork Shoulder Braised in Milk

post #1 of 7
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1/3 plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 pounds boneless pork shoulder, trimmed of excess fat
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 small onions, minced (about 2 cups)
4 to 5 cups whole milk

 

 

The cuisine of Bologna and Emilia-Romagna would not exist without pork, whose delicate taste and rich golden color make it the undisputed star of Bologna's best-loved dishes. One of the most traditional dishes of Bologna is a loin of pork braised gently in milk on top of the stove, until the meat is tender and the milk has thickened and browned into glazed clusters of sauce. The last time I was in Bologna I discovered a variation that produced an even more tender meat, made with a boneless pork shoulder, a fattier meat, which was slowly braised in the oven, not on top of the stove. I loved it.


Preheat the oven to 300F.


     Heat the oil in a large, heavy ovenproof skillet (one with a lid) over medium-high heat. Season the pork on all sides with the salt and pepper, and add to the pan, fat side down. Cook, turning, until the meat has a nice golden color, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a large platter.


     Discard the fat from the pan and wipe clean with paper towels. Return the pan to medium-low heat and add the butter. As soon as the butter begins to foam, add the onions and cook, stirring, until soft and pale yellow, 6 to 7 minutes. Place the pork over the onions and add enough milk to come about one third of the way up the sides of the meat. As soon as the milk comes to a boil, turn off the heat, cover the pan with heavy-duty foil, and top with the lid. Place the pan on the middle rack of the oven and cook, basting and turning the meat every 30 or 40 minutes, until it easily flakes when pierced with a fork, about 3 hours.


     Transfer the meat to a cutting board and cover loosely with foil. Place the pan on medium-high heat and cook, stirring, until the remaining milk has reduced and coagulated into thick, brown clusters. Cut the meat (it will probably fall apart), and place on warm serving dishes. Top with the browned milk clusters and serve hot.


Courtesy Biba's Italy, by Biba Caggiano, Workman Publishing, 2006


Click here to read a review of "Biba's Italy"

 
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post #2 of 7

This is an Italian style recipe for pork tenderloin brined in buttermilk: pork tenderloin recipe

I find video recipes to be really useful when learning cooking techniques.  A written recipe is sometimes just not enough.  Watching experienced cooks prepare a dish is so helpful.  Bon apetit!

post #3 of 7

Pork braised in milk is one of my very favorite dishes. The browned milk cluster has this amazing nutty flavor. I got to make this again sometimes soon. tongue.gif

post #4 of 7

If you have a solid heart, try a pork shoulder braised in half and half. Hmmm creamy. You can even add a bit of Dijon Mustard to the half and half for a different result.

 

I usually blend the sauce with an immersion blender before serving it, never tried just serving the clusters as they don't seem very appetizing to me.

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

If you have a solid heart, try a pork shoulder braised in half and half. Hmmm creamy. You can even add a bit of Dijon Mustard to the half and half for a different result.

 

I usually blend the sauce with an immersion blender before serving it, never tried just serving the clusters as they don't seem very appetizing to me.



The clusters aren't lookers, but they taste so good!

 

Half and half - I'm sure it taste fantastic and I'm sure that my doctor would advice against it.

post #6 of 7

For an even fuller flavour mix a bit of blue vein and diced dried apricot with it towards the end.

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post #7 of 7

Is it just me or does the cooking time on this seem short?

 

I guess it depends on the size of the pork shoulder, but even a 5 pounder is going to take a good 5 hours for it to reach 190ish degrees internal. Which is the temp at which the meat will be "fall off the bone"

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