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how easy is it to sharpen global knives

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I have a set of Fujiwara Carbon Steel knives that sharpen up very easy. However, I love the feel of global knives in my hands. I would love to buy some but not if they are are chore to sharpen. I know they will not sharpen up as easy as my carbon knives but what has been your experience with sharpening global knives?
post #2 of 9
A lot depends on how you sharpen.  So... How do you sharpen?

You're right in thinking Globals won't sharpen as well or as quickly as your Fujiwaras.  However, in the greater scheme of things they actually sharpen fairly easily and fairly well.  Considering the amount of chromium in their "CroMoVa18 alloy, that's fair to partly amazing.  

In terms of edge taking characteristics, Globals are a lot like high-end German knives.  In fact, you can even sharpen them effectively on western style "oilstones" (don't use oil!),  including tri-hones and Arkansas stones.  But, a decent set of waterstones will make things go much quicker. 

Bottom line:  If you have a decent kit and are reasonably proficient with it, Globals are not a problem.

BDL
Edited by boar_d_laze - 2/17/10 at 10:52am
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post



How were you planning on sharpening?

BDL

I use a spyderco sharpmaker for all my knives
post #4 of 9
The Sharpmaker is one of the two or three best "V" stick sharpners available.  But, as with the others, speed and ultimate sharpness are limited.  You mght say that it takes a lot of strokes to get to that limit.  I'd expect a Global to require about 30% to 50% more strokes to attain max sharpness which would be not quite the same level of almost-sharpness you get with your Fujiwaras.   

BDL
post #5 of 9
i think global sells their own wetstones and guide for sharpening to ensure proper angle, so it seems pretty easy...

sharpening is $3 per knife at my local resturant supply store
post #6 of 9
Ease of sharpening has more to do with your ability first. equipment secondarily and knife tertiarilly. That said, as one and two are constants in this mix for you, you'll find the globals take more strokes initially to get the edge you want. Working the knife lightly and regularly (every week or two depending on usage) on the flats of the white stone will keep the edge in good shape without too much effort. You'll occasionally need to do more than that.

One nice thing about the sharpmaker is you can clean out the swarf by sticking the stones in the dishwasher.
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

The Sharpmaker is one of the two or three best "V" stick sharpners available.  But, as with the others, speed and ultimate sharpness are limited.  You mght say that it takes a lot of strokes to get to that limit.  I'd expect a Global to require about 30% to 50% more strokes to attain max sharpness which would be not quite the same level of almost-sharpness you get with your Fujiwaras.   

BDL


Are you saying there is a sharpener that can sharpen my knives faster and sharper than the sharpmaker? Please let me know, I am very interested in knowing
post #8 of 9
Good bench stones would take you much sharper, if you learn the skills to use them.  

An Edge Pro Apex would be much better as well, with a much easier learning curve than stones.

A Chef's Choice electric machine would be somewhat better, significantly easer and faster too. 

Other jig and tool, "rod-guide" sets like the Lasky, with the right set of hones, are better than a Sharpmaker -- although they cannot match an Edge Pro system.

There are limits to how sharp a Sharpmaker can take a knife, and they're pretty severe.  In addition, because of the size of the rods it's rather awkward for longer knives.  As good a "V" stick as the Sharpmaker is,  the large Idahone works better for kitchen knives.

A little more about Chef's Choice: Not all electric sharpeners are created equal.  Chef's Choice machines actually work and will not do damage to your knives.  They make machines with a 15* bevel which is appropriate for almost all asian manufactured knives -- including Fujiwara and Global. 

A little more about the Edge Pro Apex:
  Given that you're the sort of person who doesn't mind the time and inconvenience of a Sharpmaker, you'd probably be most comfortable with an Edge Pro -- not to mention the oustanding results you'd get.  Twice as good for just as much trouble and three times the price.  How can you beat that?

If a Sharpmaker is the standard against which you measure sharpness, you'll find actual sharpness an entirely different universe. 

BDL
post #9 of 9
Global knives are not difficult to sharpen providing you have a good 'sharpener', definitely sharpen them at a lower angle than 45degrees, if it's your first time at owning and sharpening Global knives it might be a good idea to invest in some 'Guides' to begin with.
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