ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Does boiling an egg for 45 seconds kill salmonella?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Does boiling an egg for 45 seconds kill salmonella? - Page 2

post #31 of 47

It may kill the salmonella inside but not in the outside!
So watch out for that!!

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #32 of 47
Consumer Reports' latest tests found contamination in 66 percent of supermarket chicken. Not just 1 in 20,000!! You see this a lot: people just don't want facts that threaten their habits. I have no idea how dangerous salmonella actually is but many chickens you eat are infected.
post #33 of 47

Just the reverse it will kill contaminants on outside. As far as inside, unless cracked it would be almost sterile like our bodies. We get infection from an opening in skin like a scrape or cut.

 

Salmonella is rampart in poultry. younger children and seniors are the most prone to get it. One of biggest sources is a hospital.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #34 of 47

Thanks, Pete.  I always thought that salmonella was on the inside until I saw a cooking show that said to boil the egg for x amount of time to kill the salmonella on the outside.  THEN I thought THAT was all that was needed! Now you say that it is on the inside as well.  Phew!  Lots of conflicting info out there.  Thanks for your post!  Now I think I'll go to my college's library database and see what else I can find out based on research.  I LOVE raw cookie dough, been eating it as a kid, would rather have it than the cookie...well, maybe I won't go that far...and yes, like the raw stuff from SAM's club.  Unfortunately, eating raw cookie dough (and cake batter) are a part of our family culture, but if I can be more smart about it (without going "scientifically or politically correct" so to speak to ruin the family traditions, that would be great!  And no, I'm not a junk food junkie.  I typically don't even eat the cookies that I make for our family because I freeze them.  I can't be bothered by a frozen cookie (but the rest of my family can:))

post #35 of 47
Article:
Recovery of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis from inoculated broiler hatching eggs using shell rinse and shell crush sampling methods.
Author:
Webb, M. L.
Journal:
Poultry science
ISSN:
0032-5791
Date:
08/01/2014
Volume:
93
Issue:
8
Page:
2117 - 2122
post #36 of 47
Article:
Assessment of the risk of salmonellosis from internally contaminated shell eggs following initial storage at 18 °C (65 °F), compared with 7 °C (45 °F).
Author:
Pouillot, R.
Journal:
Food microbiology
ISSN:
0740-0020
Date:
10/01/2014
Volume:
43
Page:
16 - 19

 

Might be better than the last scientific study, but for me, what I have learned that salmonella can be present on one or both parts of an egg.  

post #37 of 47

Just want to point out the purpose of coddling eggs is not necessarily to kill bacteria, but to slightly thicken them for use in things like ceaser dressing. This is why the Reluctant Goumet coddled the egg.

post #38 of 47


Just some info from CRFA Food Safety Code of Practice

If your going to necro an old thread at least it was interesting. Did them articles mention anything usefull @JMorgan?

I love easy yolks, whites not so much. Id put an easy egg o. Just about anything. Funny no servers ever " inform " me or anyone else about the " pathogens" haha use info as see fit.
post #39 of 47

Basically, like I said..."what I have learned is that salmonella can be present on one or both parts of an egg."  That's enough for me for now.  Mtullius threw her two bits in about coddling.  Doesn't seem to kill salmonella, though, right?  So what's a good cook to do when it comes to the Hollandaise sauce, a Caesar dressing, or coddled egg?  

post #40 of 47

I wouldn't have a clue, but how does he feel?!

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMorgan View Post

I wouldn't have a clue, but how does he feel?!

??

I guess Salmonella is killed at 145. Id like to see some studies. Teacher told me this morning in food safe training that 1 in 24 chickens is infected and that he wont eat runny yolks. Im not ready to give up my eggs just yet.

Sorry about the confusion about what you learned haha. Looked like random article search with no quotes from it.

So all I can say is in my opinion a good cook can takes the information and does the best they can with it. Me, Im going to ignore the science and eat a bunch of over easy eggs. Good or bad who know lokenyoubsaid its confusing. Eat your dough I'd advise. You only live once or twice.

Im really tired so I hope this makes some kind of sense haha
post #42 of 47

I have two things to add to this discussion

 

1) There's no magic temperature where all Salmonella is immediately dead.  They start dying off at 136 F, but it takes a long time.  Here's a graph of how long it takes to kill off salmonella to a safe level in chicken meat, which is a different substrate than an egg of course, but it gives you an idea.

2) This reminds me of an article on why other countries are okay not refrigerating their eggs

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/09/11/336330502/why-the-u-s-chills-its-eggs-and-most-of-the-world-doesnt

 

I would say that an unwashed egg is actually safer on the inside, as long as you don't contaminate it in the cracking process.  Then again if you crack and use right away, there's no time for bacteria to grow.  It's getting late here.  Blasted insomnia!

post #43 of 47

When hard cooking eggs .Peel wearing gloves, this cuts down possibility of contamination. To be EXTRA safe after peeling dip eggs in boiling water again for about 60 seconds. Then place in cold water.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #44 of 47

You make sense, and I totally agree :).  I did read the articles but have spent way too much time researching articles and writing about them lately (for my MS) to feel like quoting them.  The articles should be available through a Google or Google Scholars search. Anyway, doesn't seem like they matter much.  Too much conflicting info out there...I'll stick with my runny yolks and eat my cookie dough, too.  I'll take my chances with raw oysters as well...another discussion for another time, I suppose... :)  Take care!

post #45 of 47

Use pasteurized eggs.

 

http://www.safeeggs.com/store-locator

 

You will still need to coddle them if the recipe calls for it, because as I said, the purpose of coddling is to thicken the egg.

post #46 of 47
I may be mis informed but I was under the impression that all eggs were pasteurized these days. My Food Safe trainer suggested that it is cost prohibitive for all eggs to be pasteurized and that only the most expensive eggs are; and they are labeled as so. I forgot to check at the store today. I will ask around someday.



Some wiki info
The 2013 FDA Food Code states that in serving highly susceptible populations (preschool age children; older adults; individuals with compromised immune systems; and individuals who receive meals through custodial care-giving environments such as child or adult day care centers, kidney dialysis centers, hospitals, or nursing homes [11]): “Pasteurized eggs or egg products shall be substituted for raw eggs in the preparation of Foods such as Caesar salad, hollandaise or Béarnaise sauce, mayonnaise, meringue, eggnog, ice cream, egg-fortified beverages and recipes in which more than one egg is broken and the eggs are combined.”[4]
post #47 of 47

A friend in Canada told me that all their eggs are pasteurized but I don't find anything to confirm that.

 

More wiki info-"All egg products sold in the U.S must be pasteurized due to the risk of food-borne illnesses per U.S. Department of Agriculture rules...They also do not recommend eating shell eggs that are raw or undercooked." Note egg "products" must be pasteurized but apparently not the shell eggs themselves. Maybe this is where you got the impression all eggs are pasteurized.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking

Gear mentioned in this thread:

ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Does boiling an egg for 45 seconds kill salmonella?