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Crisps!

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
i am fascinated by the idea of making crisps and using them as a garnish especially when the crisp isn't made from potatoes

Parsnip crips - peelings deep fried until crisp and then seasoned.

Parma Ham crisps - thin slices of ham pressed and baked until crispy.

Pancetta crisps - same concept as above.

Orange/Lemon/Lime crisps - sliced thinly then dried out in a oven slowly on low temp.

Parsnip Game chips - deep fried julienne matchsticks

Tomato crisps - dried out slices with seasoning and chopped herbs. 

Parmesan crisps - melted grated fresh parmesan


just a few ideas that work excellent as a garnish for things like soups, starters, mains and desserts
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we're as good as our last meal.
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post #2 of 17
For those of us in the US (and elsewhere) who may not know, in UK "Crisps" = Chips.
post #3 of 17
"Crisps" = Chips is depend on the english we use , it is quit varied . if the potato serve cold it is called potato chips. Actually all of then depend on the language or country .
post #4 of 17
Coulis-O, those sound like great ideas.  I've been dabbling in the wonderful world of garnish lately for my catering and I'm finding a remarkably varied assortment of ways to dress up our food.

When you make the parma ham & pancetta crisps is it parchement paper and baking trays you use to press, while in the oven?  or do you press, then bake?

I stumbled across a recipe (more of a method, really) for making pepperoni chips/crisps.  Basically you just slice 'em thin and nuke them into a sort of pepperoni jerky.  The fat in them crisps them up and then drains out, leaving a very flavourful snack that is not too greasy if you blott them enough.

I've also been 'practicing' making cheddar cheese crisps for upcoming St. Paddy's Day trays.  I really like fried cheese so I've been practicing a lot
post #5 of 17
Making "crisps" is not a new concept, but hasn't really been explored that much. I know that many restaurants use parmesan crisps, as you said just grated parmesan broiled for about two minutes, but for example I've never thought of tomato crisps. I have the Thomas Keller French Laundry cook book, and he has a recipe for tomato powder. Maybe if you made the tomato powder, you could use it the same way as parmesan crisps and see how that works out. If you want I can give you the recipe for the tomato powder, it uses just tomatoes and nothing else, so if you're interested i can tell you, or you might find it online.
post #6 of 17
I would very much like the recipe for the tomato powder, please   

There are commercially prepared 'veggie chips' at the local grocery; pretty sure they are formed/pressed chips (crisps) made in a ripple style from tomato, spinach, and some manner of squash.  Colourful, tastey, crispy texture, highly addictive and allegedly 'healthy'.  I believe there is a potato base involved, but I'm not sure.  I'll be setting up an outdoor fryer this summer and I'd love to play with some crispy vegetable variations.
post #7 of 17
I don't know about any formal recipes. All I do is slice the tomatoes, run them through the dehydator until they're crispy, then grind them like any other spice.

I've always got a jar of the powder on hand. Never thought it was anything special to do so.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 17
I'd never heard of tomato powder before. What do you use it for? 
post #9 of 17
I use it to help kick up soups, stews and similar dishes.

It's also not bad sprinkled on eggs and some potato dishes (sort of the way you'd use paprika).
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 17
Thanks - Interesting. When you say "kick up" does that mean "brighten up" just like you would by adding a bit of lemon juice (but obviously with a different flavor)?
post #11 of 17
What you get is the tartness as well as the flavor of tomato. Hadn't thought of it before, but they're both acids, so it's a similar taste. But tomato isn't as, what shall we call it, flowery as lemon juice.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 17
Great - thanks for the info. Something new to try for me!
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgchef View Post

Making "crisps" is not a new concept, but hasn't really been explored that much. I know that many restaurants use parmesan crisps, as you said just grated parmesan broiled for about two minutes, but for example I've never thought of tomato crisps. I have the Thomas Keller French Laundry cook book, and he has a recipe for tomato powder. Maybe if you made the tomato powder, you could use it the same way as parmesan crisps and see how that works out. If you want I can give you the recipe for the tomato powder, it uses just tomatoes and nothing else, so if you're interested i can tell you, or you might find it online.

 

the 'tomato powder' idea reminds me of another similar recipe idea i have seen made called 'Basil Glass'.

for Basil Glass, a thick and clear stock syrup was made with boiling fresh basil water and sugar together and then spread out on a matfer mat and left to cool until it set rock hard like honeycomb. then it was broken up and blitzed in a food processor into a powder, the powder was then sprinkled onto matfer mats individually creating and covering an area no bigger than a fried egg would cover, the powdered mixture was then replaced back into an oven @ 100deg celcius until the powder had melted and formed together, then removed and placed to cool on cooling racks.


i read a recipe of gordon ramsays where he made powdered scollop roes, initially dry them out slowly in an oven and then blitz to a fine powder.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charron View Post

Coulis-O, those sound like great ideas.  I've been dabbling in the wonderful world of garnish lately for my catering and I'm finding a remarkably varied assortment of ways to dress up our food.

When you make the parma ham & pancetta crisps is it parchement paper and baking trays you use to press, while in the oven?  or do you press, then bake?

I stumbled across a recipe (more of a method, really) for making pepperoni chips/crisps.  Basically you just slice 'em thin and nuke them into a sort of pepperoni jerky.  The fat in them crisps them up and then drains out, leaving a very flavourful snack that is not too greasy if you blott them enough.

I've also been 'practicing' making cheddar cheese crisps for upcoming St. Paddy's Day trays.  I really like fried cheese so I've been practicing a lot

yes charron, for the parma ham/pancetta crisps you will need two flat baking trays and silicone paper on both the top and bottom, bake them @ 200deg celcius for 10 mins, take out and place on cooling racks preferably under a hot lamp to dry them out further
we're as good as our last meal.
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we're as good as our last meal.
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post #14 of 17
Thanks, Coulis-O, the Basil glass idea is great too! Sure would help make fine presentations when receiving special guests!
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
i have found that crisps do make for excellent garnishes french fries

also Petals introduced the idea to me of Sweet potato crisps, crispy kale, bacon curls, and beetroot crisps ... which reminded me of when i would deep fry curly parsley until crisp for garnish for fish dishes such as ocean pie, haddock anglaise, cod mornay, scampi etc
we're as good as our last meal.
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we're as good as our last meal.
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post #16 of 17
Crispy kale! Of course! My sister showed me how to simply toss kale with a bit of olive oil and salt, then bake it until very dry and crispy. We then served it to the kids as "chips" and they loved it. It didn't even cross my mind that it could be used as a garnish though!
post #17 of 17
 Thomas keller cookbook, tomato powder

Take 1/2 a cup of tomato pulp(from seeded and peeled tomato) and put into two layers of cheesecloth( I made this yesterday and used towel) and squeeze to remove excess moisture. Put parchment paper on microwave tray and spread pulp on it. Put in microwave low power for 30-40 minutes. Take out, let cool to room temp, and put in spice grinder, mortar and pestle, food processor etc. Put through tamis or fine seive and store in airtight container.
      I dont like using a microwave, especially since mine is horrible, so i'm probably gonna make it again next week in my oven, but i don't really think it matters.
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