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Ostrich Eggs: Whaddaya know about 'em

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

One of the local markets around here sometimes carry ostrich eggs (they look positively HUGE next to the quail eggs), and it's tempting to try one but they are quite spendy.  So, maybe someone's had some experience with them.  How do thewy taste - strong, mild, any "off" or unusual flavor profile?  This morning while watching Big Cat Diary on Animal Planet, a lioness was shown eating a few ostrich eggs and the observer mentioned that they were "stinky."  Do the eggs have a strong, or perhaps disagreeable, odor?  Any other thoughts on these eggs?

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post #2 of 13
I have never eaten one but have heard that A: they taste a little stronger then even a good farm fresh egg.  B: one ostrich egg is the equivalent of like 30 eggs. so be sure to have friends over.

Also saw on tv some place that served ostrich egg omlettes. Due to the cost of the egg the cook would use a dremel to cut a small hole in the end of the egg and then insert a tool of sorts and scramble it inside the shell. This way the goo would come out and they could rinse out and sell the shell to a local artist and recoup some cost.
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post

I have never eaten one but have heard that A: they taste a little stronger then even a good farm fresh egg.  B: one ostrich egg is the equivalent of like 30 eggs. so be sure to have friends over.

Also saw on tv some place that served ostrich egg omlettes. Due to the cost of the egg the cook would use a dremel to cut a small hole in the end of the egg and then insert a tool of sorts and scramble it inside the shell. This way the goo would come out and they could rinse out and sell the shell to a local artist and recoup some cost.
 

Yeah, the eggs were expensive - about $8.00 apiece IIRC, maybe even a bit more.  I'm sure tempted to try one though.  Maybe one egg can be used in a recipe that calls for a lot of eggs.
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post #4 of 13
The easiest would probably be a giant Fritata type dish or several Quiches. Now I want some breakfast.
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post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Checking the 'net, I found this comment from an ostrich ranch in Arizona: 

Quote:
"The ostrich egg is equal to approximately two dozen chicken eggs. It is a little sweeter and fluffier than chicken eggs but tastes almost the same. They are lower in cholesterol and healthier than chicken eggs. The egg yolk is a deep yellow-orange color. "

An interesting aside, ostrich egg shells seem to be selling for between $5.00 and $12.00 each, and eggs are selling for as much as $18.00.
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post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmoozer View Post

... and eggs are selling for as much as $18.00.
Whew! Just bought 5 dozen for $8.99!
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post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post



Whew! Just bought 5 dozen for $8.99!

 

Five dozen ostrich eggs ... nah, you must mean regular eggs.
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post #8 of 13
All I know about Ostrich eggs is that they're big. :)
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post #9 of 13
This should be an international forum but I see often "local" english slang which makes it difficult for those who are not american,

Whaddaya

is not proper, means to an Italian, an Indian, that you are speaking only to US people. I also see a lot of gotta and wanna on posts. Please consider, before writing, that your audience is international.
post #10 of 13
Wonder how long it would take to make a hard boiled ostrich egg for salads or mimosa?  It sure would cutt down on shelliing time for the 24 or so hens eggs equivalent!  Never seen one, never tried one.

(Tuscan Chef - yes it does take a bit of getting used to....I'm from Australia where English is our first language, but the language changes from country to country, as in: "owyagoing" here just means "How are you today?" in proper English.  I've had to have some terms explained to me too.  If you are not sure, just ask.  People will happily let you know ).
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post #11 of 13

based on my reading1 ostrich egg would take you about 40 minutes to hard boil!

An ostrich weighs from 300 - 400 pounds and lives up to 60 years. 

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuscan Chef View Post

This should be an international forum but I see often "local" english slang which makes it difficult for those who are not american,

Whaddaya

is not proper, means to an Italian, an Indian, that you are speaking only to US people. I also see a lot of gotta and wanna on posts. Please consider, before writing, that your audience is international.
 

Sorry, Tuscan chef.  I am Canadian, not American, but I will endevour to restrict my use of slang.  It is used often by me in communication and, while it may be linguistically lazy of me, I do not intend it to be exclusionary.  If I happen to slip back into my comfort zone of expressions occasionally I hope you will refrain from being offended.


Has anyone worked out a cost/volume comparison between the ostrich and chicken eggs?  Our summer demand for scrambled in the mornings might make the ostrich egg more convenient if the novelty markup is not too high.
post #13 of 13
Hey guys, I just joined this forum simply by coming across this thread about ostrich eggs.

I recently purchased one at Whole Foods Market for $30 US. It is equivalent to 28 chicken eggs. It weighed about 5 pounds. We used a hammer and chisel to crack the egg open. The yolk itself is about 4-5 inches in diameter, almost as wide as a CD. and the whites are a little bit more dense than a chicken egg.

We ended up scrambling the egg and making omelets out of it. FLAVOR wise, it is a lot milder in flavor than a chicken egg. It is also lighter in color, very light compared to a scrambled chicken egg. I would assume there is less fat in an ostrich egg also.

My avatar is a picture of me holding an ostrich egg. I hope this answered some of your questions.
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