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Demi glace

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone, I would really be interested in hearing from other chefs on how they prepare their demi glace. If you are like me you have probably worked in a ton of kitchens, and have seen a hundred different ways of making a great demi. Currently I use a preparation that takes about three days, but the end result is excellent. [list=1][*]Roast bones.
After into the stock pot and cover with cold water. I let this come to a simmer and it goes for most of the day.[*]The second day I roast my mirepoix with tomato product very slowly in the oven. This then goes into the simmering stock. I also add a healthy amount of red wine.[*]Finally after the stock has been cooking for about two days I strain it and then reduce. [/list=a]
Pretty long process but the end result is excellent (and expensive).

Any thoughts?

------------------
Thanks,

Nicko
nicko@cheftalk.com
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Nicko 
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Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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post #2 of 5
You forgot one very important step-making a remi (or wash) from the bones after finishing your stock. After I strain my stock the first time I cover the bones with water again (just enough to cover) and simmer for 1-2 hours. I then stain that liquid off and use that as part of my liquid for my next batch of stock. You would be surprised how much flavor and stock you leave behind on your bones the first time around.
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Yeah Pete I am with you on that, I used to do that myself.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #4 of 5
I have seen many ways of making a demi, but this way that i had been shown seems to work the best, resulting in a finer, better flavoured product.

1) Roast bones and off cuts and 2 pork trotters (for collagen).
2) Cover with water in a pot and bring to a simmer
3) Fry mirepoix with fresh rosemary and thyme using the roasting tray, then add a little tomato paste, fry a little more, then add water to the mixture and deglaze the tray and then reduce the heat.

tip - tomato innards are also very good for this but dont use any tomato skins.

4) Let the bones simmer for about 20- 30 mins and skim as needed.

5) After the majority of the fat is skimmed off the bones, add the roasted mirepoix mix.

6) Let stock simmer for 6-8 hrs (i actually prefer 2-3 days)skimming fat and adding some water as required

7) Strain stock through muslin cloth or (preferably) a oil filter.

8) Start reducing the stock

9) Sweat off mirepoix, rosemary and thyme and then add 1 part red wine vinegar to 3 parts red wine and reduce.

10) Add to stock.

11) Reduce somemore.

phew, and i cut it short. This process is a little more flowing in practice.
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post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
It really is an amazing process to get to that liquid. Has anyone used pre-fabricated demi? I have tried to brands that were given to me. One was extremely salty and it was about $300.00 for a small tub of it. It came in a condensed form so you had to dilute it heavily. Strangely enough it tasted as though it was too over carmelized, and it actually had a subtle burnt flavor. The other brand is Natural Classics demi glace. It is made by a local Chicago Chef and it is all natural and contains no preservatives! Awhile back at the Plitt Seafood show I tried some and it was excellent. You can check out his website at: www.demiglace.com

------------------
Thanks,

Nicko
nicko@cheftalk.com

[This message has been edited by Nicko (edited September 27, 2000).]
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
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