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Need Everyone's Help on Alternative Pans

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I am in the process of putting together a review site for cookware because I am sick and tired of seeing people spending their hard earned money on junk.

I am looking for non-stick pans that do NOT contain any PFOA/PTFE. I have found several...

Cuisinart GreenGourmet

Has anyone got any experience with any of these or any of the non-stick alternatives to Teflon??

Would love to hear your thoughts!

post #2 of 7
The brands you mention haven't done very well in testing.  See for instance the Cooks Illustrated review of non-stick pans from 2009.  They do have their individual supporters.  Though there's only so far you can extrapolate collected "anecdotal" evidence into anything useful.  It's so self-selecting, for one thing.

A synthesis of the reactions of cooks with solid technique and my own experience leads me to conclude that on balance, properly seasoned and maintained carbon steel and cast iron pieces are superior performers to any commercial "non stick" coating; and more versatile as well -- especially in the critical areas of saute, searing and fond. 

They're also "greener."

True, one shouldn't do long wine or tomato reductions in them; and that does mean owning some non-reactive (like stainless) skillets as well.  But that's not the sort of thing you usually do in a skillet anyway.

post #3 of 7
I think I've tried every PTFE-free non-stick skillet on the market, certainly the three you asked about and several other brands as well.  Overall, many of them are poorly made, not heavy enough to conduct heat evenly, and look like they belong in the sale bin at a dollar store.  In other words, junk, to use your term.   Additionally, some of the non-stick coatings are horrible.  The Thermolon coating on the GreenPans bubbles up and loses its non-stick properties after a few uses. 

IMHO, Cuisinart Green Gourmet is the best of the bunch.  Their skillets are well-made and the ceramic coating is actually non-stick.  I've been using skillets from both the stainless and HA Green Gourmet lines for about a year now and they've held up well.  I use them mostly for pancakes and eggs, for which I find non-stick to be very advantageous.

Two additional issues here:

The marketing ploys used by cookware manufacturers.  They label a lot of things "green"  or "healthy," which can mean PFOA-free, PTFE-free, or simply that the packaging was made from recycled paper.  You really have to do your research to figure out what you're buying.

To the best of my knowledge, none of the PTFE-free non-stick lines currently being sold are induction-compatible.

If you're starting a review site for cookware, I would be sure to include a list of induction-compatible cookware, non-stick or otherwise.
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
boar_d_laze - I agree with you assessments. Although - regardless of my thoughts, I know people are going to want to use a non stick pan for eggs and such. So I feel it only prudent for me to include such in my recommendations. Thanks for your help!


KCZ - I agree that a lot of pans belong in the sale bin at the dollar store. I am glad to hear that the GreenGourmet is holding up well. I just picked up one for evaluation. I put a micrometer on it and discovered that Cuisinart makes this pan almost 2x as thick as the Rachael Ray HA. The surface also looks like glass. I could not believe how shinny and smooth it is.

Regarding everyone wanting to "look" green -- I agree -- companies are lying to look green. I have several articles that will appear on my site that point this out. In fact, Swiss Diamond is trying hard to pull one over on us when they say that PTFE is not the same as Teflon.

Induction - I agree. I will have a section on cookware suitable for induction. Additionally, every review will also tell what cooktops that particular cookware will work on.


Thanks again for your help.

I would love to hear from the rest of you. Your comments and input are much appreciated!
post #5 of 7
As with most others, I'm a big believer that "non-stick" pans--if you HAVE to buy them---should only be used for eggs and such, and even then, they never really last anyway. 

Meh, the wife keeps on buying them and then burning them, and I just take off the handles and use them for under-plates for the indoor plants--or use them to soak off the resin and build-up on my tablesaw blades...... 

As BDL says, anyone can fry an egg or make an omelette in  carbon steel pan, and these hardly ever wear out---much more "greener"
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
post #6 of 7
I agree with the "Egg's only" for non-stick.  I only use my non-stick for omelette's.  Everything else is carbon or stainless.  Really, once you get it down how to season and use them, they really are the best way to go and absolutely non-stick.  Carbon steel with acid? I've not noticed any taste difference, but I certainly don't do any thing more than an quick reduction.
post #7 of 7
Yeah, I buy cheap non-sticks for eggy stuff and change them out every year or so. A lady at Williams-Sonoma tried to sell me an AllClad non-stick and I ran away screaming.

Foodpump said
 "...or use them to soak off the resin and build-up on my tablesaw blades.."

My son the cabinetmaker taught me that the best and cheapest way to clean a circular saw blade is to soak it for about 20 minutes in hot tap water with a couple tablespoons of baking soda.  All the crud wipes right off.

No Oven Cleaner or expensive special "sawblade cleaners."

Really amazing.

Hope you use Forrest blades exclusively.  With stabilizers. 

Forrest makes a nice thick stabilizer, but Lee Valley has an adjustable stabilizer disk with setscrews around its perimeter which bear on the blade. You set up your feeler gauge just below the teeth and line up the sawblade disk by turning successive setscrews on the stabilizer to achieve less than .001" runout and it gives you a beautiful cut, especially if it's a Forrest blade. Not nearly as complicated as it sounds, especially after you've done it a couple of times.


 Now, back to topic.  Sorry
travelling gourmand
travelling gourmand
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