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Induction cooking

post #1 of 11
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So I've been reading up on induction cook tops and the gist of it is the magnetic doo-hicky makes the the the heat release directly from the pot instead of the having heat transferring from outside of the pot to inside which wastes energy.
They work with any stainless steel that sticks to a magnet ,cast iron and carbon steel( I think?) . 

Does it only heat on the bottom of the pot/pan? or would the whole pot heat up evenly ( assuming every part is made from the same material). If so then would that mean if I cook it with an cast iron dutch oven covered, it would mimic the effect of an oven right?
post #2 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gNnairdA View Post


 If so then would that mean if I cook it with an cast iron dutch oven covered, it would mimic the effect of an oven right?
 

I don't think so.  With oven cooking,  it is the heated air that does the cooking, allowing for dry roasting meats, baking of breads & cakes etc.  As I understand it,  with induction cooking, the heat is transferred directly through the bottom of the pan into the food much more intensly than it would be in an oven.  So even with the lowest heat setting,  one would not be able to actually bake something on the stovetop, because some liquid would be required to prevent scorching.
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post #3 of 11
Got one of these at home.

General rule - If a magnet will stick to it, it'll heat.
Ferromagnetic pots are the ones to go for.

The key thing is that the heat is generated in the area of the pan that the induced current passes through when it's placed in the magnetic field of the induction coil. That isn't necessarily the same thing as the whole pan.

Any part of the pan affected by the magnetic field conducts due to the oscillating electromagnetic field. That means that the bits of the pan influenced by it will conduct and generate heat, and the bits outside of the range of the magnet will either not conduct, or conduct poorly.

= things like high sided pans and woks don't heat evenly over the entire surface.
post #4 of 11
got these types of stoves at work and to answer your questions:

1) yes, only the bottom of the pan will heat up.

2) no, the induction stove would not mimic the effect of a convection oven.


personally i dislike cooking on electrical stove tops especially the magnetic induction ones tend to be quite powerful and thus there's more chance of burning/overcooking the food in the pan i have found.
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post #5 of 11
Originally Posted by Coulis-o View Post
1) yes, only the bottom of the pan will heat up.

So much for the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics.

BDL
post #6 of 11
^ ok BDL maybe you're right, the whole pan will heat up over a long enough time and even the handle too ... but not enough to create a convection type atmosphere within a pan with a lid on... maybe it would help in cooking some stews and the likes...


but if the desired effect is to have a convectional cooking effect inside a pan that is mainly used for conduction, then why not just put the pan in the oven with a lid on it?!?!?!?
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post #7 of 11
Coulis-o, 

Stop talking for a minute and think.  Why do you think it's called a dutch oven?  You can actually work this out with a little thought or with a little research. 

BDL
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by gNnairdA View Post

So I've been reading up on induction cook tops and the gist of it is the magnetic doo-hicky makes the the the heat release directly from the pot instead of the having heat transferring from outside of the pot to inside which wastes energy.
They work with any stainless steel that sticks to a magnet ,cast iron and carbon steel( I think?) . 

Does it only heat on the bottom of the pot/pan? or would the whole pot heat up evenly ( assuming every part is made from the same material). If so then would that mean if I cook it with an cast iron dutch oven covered, it would mimic the effect of an oven right?

the problem here is that you fail to describe exactly what you are cooking in such a thing as a dutch oven.

you put much emphasis on the type of stove and type of cooking pot used that you fail to explain exactly what it is that you intend to cook by such a method ... is it a stew or casserole type dish ... ?
we're as good as our last meal.
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we're as good as our last meal.
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post #9 of 11
gNnairdA,

A cast iron dutch oven (with a bottom flat enough for good conduction) on an induction top mimics a regular oven no better and no worse that it does on any heat source.

Put a rack in it, cook over low heat, and it makes a pretty fair substitute.  They're not quite the same in that the Dutch ovens tend to use a higher ratio of radiant/convection than regular ovens. 

This particular aspect of a Dutch oven's versatility is primarily useful over a camp stove or in some other situation where there's no "real" oven.  Why you'd want to do it in a kitchen which has a regular oven, I have no idea.

BDL
Edited by boar_d_laze - 3/27/10 at 9:40pm
post #10 of 11
I would imagine that the section closest to the fire would be hotter compered to the ones farthest away.  Some companies like to market their products like "heats evenly" and other phrases and they can be true, but with time this properties disappear with the product's wear and tear. 
post #11 of 11
Nichole -- the bottom gets hot first, and stays hotter as long as it's over the heat.  As pots go, given the time to "come to temp," cast iron is extremely even heating.  That's ordinary physicis.

Cast iron does NOT lose it's "even heating" properties with wear.

BDL
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