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Name of fish most commonly used in real English Fish & Chips - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Sorry Gunner Ishbel's right it is Scottish and I'm a Mc not a Mac ....meaning I'm Irish decent. That's my excuse  and I'm sticking to it ...lol     I was a Chef of a Scottish Pub years ago and one of the popular requests for our Scotch Nosings was Finnan Haddie Soup  as one of the courses.....basicly it has to consist of Smoked Haddock
When ya get to my age ...well the storage files get a little mixed around!

Thanks for the FYI Ishmal!

Gypsy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar View Post

I haven't tried deep fried shark. What shark I have made I didn't much like. Always felt like it had a sandy texture and since the flavor is kind of mild in comparison to some fish i would just get something else.  I will try deep frying next time I acquire some.




P.S. What's a Finn & Haddie? it's the only thing in that list I have never heard of or tried already.

 
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post #32 of 41
Gypsy
You know the Mac being Scots and Mc being Irish is a fallacy, doncha?

And now you have me intrigued, what is a Scotch Nosings?  (And you know that nowadays unless you are referring to specific Scottish dishes, such as Scotch eggs, Scotch beef or whisky, we prefer NOT to use the word 'Scotch' to describe natives of Scotand?
post #33 of 41

Hahahaha, well you'd have to argue that one out with my dear old dad! He has the long lineage to the Orange from  Northern Ireland and well need I say more?
Mom's from  Southern Ireland ....if ya need a slice of Humble Pie she's the one to go to ...well dad he's just an old dog with no new tricks!

Scotch Nosing is not a reference to Scotts ,it is a Scotch Tasting ...but the best way is through the nose ....hence Scotch Nosing
Well we used to have over 100 scotches on the bar ...some were as I can recall $30 a shot!
Anyhow the Nosings were always booked solid! You got a 4 course meal 6 scotches to accompany ..they play games and have a scotch blinding where your blind folded and prize giveaways....Lots of fun had by all and my kitchen staff got a pretty big kick out of the bag pipers...yup the Scotch Nosing was Piped in! The Piper was offered a Nosing meal too if he chose to stay it was an allnight gala after with more piping and songs!
 

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post #34 of 41
Oh come now, Ishbel .  If it 'twere in Irish 'twould be Teeheheee
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post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC Sunshine View Post

I like flake (shark) for battering and deep frying. No chance of any bones, and its nice n chunky.  Whiting does pretty well too, same with barramundi and perch (much the same fish).

A bit of turmeric in the batter goes very well, and gives a lovely colour.  Just a touch of it, otherwise it overpowers the fish.

 

I was reading thru the replies and not seeing the answer i presumed to be correct until this one… I spent the summer in England in the early 60's and ate quite a bit of F&C and was told that the fish was sand shark at that time. It was rather good, but our real treat was the "cracklings" from the bottom of the fry basket - all wrapped up in yesterdays news.

post #36 of 41

Interesting enough, in Alaska halibut is plentiful and costs less than cold-water cod. I prefer cod as it is moister than halibut. Homer, on the Kenai Peninsula, is home to the sport fishing halibut fleet. A 300+ pound is not an unusual size for the larger females. They can reach up to 15ft in length and weigh up to 700lbs and can live for 50 years. Bring on the fish fry.

post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazza View Post

Name of fish most commomnly used in real English Fish and Chips

As bughut has already said it is cod. In England when you ask for fish and chips you expect to get cod, although there are many alternatives they are usually ordered by their name, plaice, haddock, rock salmon, skate and others. Ling and pollock are sometimes unscrupulously passed off as cod. Halibut is just way too expensive over here.

In a "real" chippie you will find steak and kidney pies, saveloys, fishcakes (cod roe), battered sausages pickled eggs, onions and gherkins.

 


I left England in 1973 when I married my GI husband :) I am from the North of England, a place called Rochdale. When we used to go to the chippie I always got the steak and kidney pudding :) The chippie back in those days had steak and kidney pies, steak and kidney puddings, mushy peas as well as the fish and chips. Fish used to be cod, but they also had haddock which my mum used to ask for sometimes. Also used to get (free) a bag of the batter "droppings" - we had a name for them but I forget what it was.

post #38 of 41

I like Black Cod, Halibut, Pollack and Boston Scrod(cod from the belly)

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #39 of 41
Basa like catfish is bottom feeder. Comes from Vietnam and not so clean waters. Don't eat too much of it.
I just started eating at the Sea Witch here in Toronto and they do a delicious Pickerel. Good texture and flavour. I find halibut a bit dry so my standard order would be haddock since I feel guilty eating cod.
My ex-boss is using talapia at the moment but I don't like the flavour or texture much. He buys it frozen hoping to save money. I've warned him it's too timid in texture. Falls apart into small pieces and has an odd flavour, metallic and murky. Customers will have to voice opinions since he doesn't trust my taste buds.
Saw Jamie Oliver do the curry sauce but why cover up such a good flavour with a heavy spice mix? Lemon to cut the fat, malt vinegar on fries only. Easy Peasy.
post #40 of 41

Currently, we have been using monkfish with huge success. 1oz portions(long strips)--cooks fast and is really meaty like monkfish should be. After I cut/portion I brine for about 6-7 minutes using Chefsteps bringing and batter which is the best batter I have come across, using beer, vodka, and cake flour, i think it's something to do with the gluten formation or low gluten content of said items. Batter stays for at least 4 days, but it never lasts that long bc we sell so much of it,. 

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smashpots View Post

Basa like catfish is bottom feeder. Comes from Vietnam and not so clean waters. Don't eat too much of it.
I just started eating at the Sea Witch here in Toronto and they do a delicious Pickerel. Good texture and flavour. I find halibut a bit dry so my standard order would be haddock since I feel guilty eating cod.
My ex-boss is using talapia at the moment but I don't like the flavour or texture much. He buys it frozen hoping to save money. I've warned him it's too timid in texture. Falls apart into small pieces and has an odd flavour, metallic and murky. Customers will have to voice opinions since he doesn't trust my taste buds.
Saw Jamie Oliver do the curry sauce but why cover up such a good flavour with a heavy spice mix? Lemon to cut the fat, malt vinegar on fries only. Easy Peasy.

Caught and mentioned in biblical times and pictured on the pyramids, Tilapia aka commonly, as "St. Peter's fish" are the "chicken fish" for the aquaculture food market. These fish from the cichlid family are warm water tolerant and eat aquatic plants making them cheap to feed. Off flavors from the fish eating algae blooms impinge the reputation of the fish. China is the major supplier and I question the consistency of their export qualities. Nutrition is good and its flesh is low in mercury. Nevertheless, I too have notice the poor taste of certain farmed Tilapia. I think country of origin should be shown for fish, game and meats.

I myself use Atlantic cod or Pollack for fish and chips.

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