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French bread a bit too heavy - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Peter, I sent you a pm.  Please let me know.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

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post #32 of 41
Thread Starter 
Hi Kokopuffs and Cakeface,
I had a wonderful time in Hong Kong and now I'm looking forward to picking up where we left off. I did not recieve the PM or the photos. Maybe I don't know how to find them. I looked on my e-mail but nothing there. Hmmm?
post #33 of 41
Peter, I re-sent the PM thru Cheftalk and so you should see it at this website/your profile.   Lemme' know, please.

-T
Edited by kokopuffs - 4/18/10 at 12:25pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #34 of 41

My browser is Internet Explorer Version 6 and I think that there's some incompatibility between it and the new formatting used at the various forums.  Your not receiving my emails relate to that incompatibility.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #35 of 41

deleted deleted deleted


Edited by kokopuffs - 4/20/10 at 5:07am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #36 of 41
post #37 of 41

Ohoo,

 

I'm not sure if you followed the entire thread -- and even if you did, you should be aware that there were a lot of PMs going back and forth that aren't reflected here. 

 

Peter Cook, the OP, was interested in producing a very specific type of bread with a very specific type of crust -- all the while fighting Filipino weather conditions.  By the time this thread ran its course you'd have to term him an  advanced baker -- at least as far as pain ordinaire.  Your suggested video recipes and  techniques don't apply to what he was trying to do.   

 

On the other hand, you've got a pretty interesting collection of resources and may want to start your own thread to better share them with those whom might best benefit.  I suspect they're pretty much lost in this thread. 

 

Welcome and good luck,

BDL

post #38 of 41

Thank you so much for the detailed steps! I have been on mission to create nice light crusty French bread. I am considered a pretty good cook and it has driven me nuts constantly having it come very flavorful but "heavy" I realize now I have been punching my bread to much and handling it to long. Looking forward to giving your process a try. fingers crossed.

post #39 of 41

Use a mix of Bread flour and All Purpose.  1 for 4.  Bread flour is too strong. Also do not "punch down". After the autolyze rest, knead lightly and let rest for 20 min. Then fold, ie: take one side and stretch and bring to middle, repeat 6-8 times going around the dough. Reshape in nice smooth ball, let rest for 20 min more and repeat folding, and one more time. then let rise 1h and divide, let rest 10 min, then shape.  And the flavour is improved if you use a pâte fermenté method.

Do the grignes before baking, (scaring).

For baking preheat to 450ºF, place the breads in, pour 1/2 glass of water at the bottom and close oven for 3 min.  Then convection 400ºF and open oven door to let steam out. Should be for 17-20 minutes more, when the breads "feel" light for their sizes. 
 

post #40 of 41

And you may consider using 1tsp malted barley sirup in the warm water with the sugar and yeast. 
 

post #41 of 41

I read through the entire thing and I am totally now completely and utterly confused....I haven't tried the original recipe on post #1 but it sounds similar to the one I used. It was a bit heavy as the recipe I used was way too much flour. As far as all the knead three times or two, temperature of flour and folding of dough. I mean really. Every place has a different temperature and pressure. For example, a recipe that works for someone in Australia may not work for someone in Mexico etc. As far as the 'professional' addition to it is concerned regarding especially the commercial end of it. Most people especially here aren't looking for that. I taught myself how to make bread and now I make many kinds. The videos that were mentioned in there are the best choice hands down. I never use temp gauges for the flour and I know what to do with my recipes when it's summer as opposed to winter.

For the steam, just have a larger pan in the front on the bottom and the bread further back and when you put the bread in, put a big chunk of ice in there, Whammo!! Instant steam ;-)  .  I find a wee bit more salt to a recipe helps with the nice crack and crunch. My mother used to have a brick in the oven and spray it with salt water. She wrecked her oven doing that unfortunately but sure made an amazing loaf of french bread. Now I just do an Italian style that has a bit of a crunch to it as I really gave up on a baguette, I finally realised that they're mostly tasteless and I just used a bit more water in a country loaf recipe and halved the recipe :D . Give that a shot. Don't worry about temp unless you're really into that, just be aware of the time of year, humidity etc. If it's really hot out, put a little more water, if your dough is a little tough to knead let it rest more, or as in my case if too many people have had a shower and not turned the fan on and it's moist, use a little  more flour when dusting...

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