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Chicken Wings: Raw vs Precooked - Page 2

post #31 of 56

Pete, I'm in that pickle myself.  I recently started frying chicken.  I'm doing it in a 14" fryer, and it doesn't leave a whole bunch of room, plus I filter every third batch.

I'm mulling over whether I want to really get into the chicken thing in a heavy way, which will entail a $9000 vent hood system plus two new 18" fryers.  All in all, about a $25,000 cash outlay. 

 

For chicken wings, I have always lightly dusted in plain flour, knocked off most of it and fried for 9-10 minutes.  For me, it seems the light breading helps keep the wings a little more juicy and helps the wing sauce adhere just a little bit better.  I might add I am NOT doing chicken wings presently except those included with my "Half-Fried Chicken Dinner".

post #32 of 56

We go through a lot of wings. Went through 18 40# cases last week, and we often hear that we have the best wings in town. We use only fresh, jumbo wings, change our fry oil twice a week and fry wings to order. During rushes we will par off some wings and have them ready to drop into the oil when orders come in. It's pretty much the only way we can keep up with orders during rushes.

We also do baked wings. We'll bake'em in the morning for 40 minutes and then crash cool them. Then it's into the oven for 5 minutes when an order comes in.

post #33 of 56

I was going to do a precook on my chicken wings but after doing an in house taste test, I decided it was much better to cook from raw stage, my customers don't mind waiting. I only have 1 fryer and I have to change oil twice a week. I run a rooming house with a cafe & tavern attached.

post #34 of 56

Thank you Chef Jim...but guys, and I'm new to this professional world actually but not in tasting, isn't taste what it's all about? And fat makes things very delicious. Rendering a chicken wing seems actually wasteful. Is fryer oil change going to make or break an outfit? Won't consumers prefer delicious even paying a little more? Or is the world indifferent, even when it comes to taste...just asking. And thanks again Jim for your insight (sanitation is #1) and MrChris for his query. Cheers.

post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Swartz Jr View Post

We go through a lot of wings. Went through 18 40# cases last week, and we often hear that we have the best wings in town. We use only fresh, jumbo wings, change our fry oil twice a week and fry wings to order. During rushes we will par off some wings and have them ready to drop into the oil when orders come in. It's pretty much the only way we can keep up with orders during rushes.

We also do baked wings. We'll bake'em in the morning for 40 minutes and then crash cool them. Then it's into the oven for 5 minutes when an order comes in.

Only twice a week doing almost #800 of wings?  At that volume I'd think every other day...

post #36 of 56

I know a guy that used to have a big catfish restaurant.  He said he fried so much fish that with the oil loss from cooking, he didn't have to replace it very often (as in going weeks at a time, evidently. 

 

He said he very seldom had to change the oil (throw it out).  He bought his oil in 55 gallon drums.  Went through a lot of filters, but didn't have to throw away a lot of oil.

post #37 of 56

The fat is going to render out of the chicken when you cook it, however you cook it. It's not wasteful because having chicken fat mixed in your fryer oil is going to shorten the life of the fryer oil. Not sure if that answers your question.

 

We get ours in fresh, 30 minute brine, air dried, tossed in oil with a bit of cayenne, and baked. Then fried to order.

I did a taste test versus raw last month and I liked the pre-cooked ones better. Crispier crust, just as moist, and half the ticket time. Perhaps the brine is the X factor?

Only go through 40lbs a week, so we can afford the extra prep time.

post #38 of 56

I only use raw wings in my fryer on 350 degrees for 13 min. 11 min cooks them thru ,but 13 makes it perfectly crispy, I then put them in  a granulated garlic  powder & liquid margarine (ONLY PURCHASED THRU  A FOOD DISTRIBUTOR) toss em  then coat  em in your sauce and let  the people  love  em!! Good Luck

post #39 of 56

Saucie, do you add any salt to the butter/garlic mix?

 

I've just started wings for the third time, looking for a couple of WOW coatings.  Any suggestions as to garlic-parmesan?  I've tried garlic-parmesan from two chains, and didn't like either very much.

 

Thanks for the suggestion.

post #40 of 56

Hi there, play around with a  half cup  liquid margarine,  eyeball 1 teaspoon each of onion powder and granulated garlic 1/2 t of fresh lemon juice, pinch of salt, 1/8 tsp white pepper  mix and coat, also  using about a 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder  will add crispiness to the   14-16 wings  while you cook them if u are baking or grilling.. Good luck:crazy:

post #41 of 56

I forgot the parm sorry hahah   Preoccupied doing menu's here. Roughly a half  cup

post #42 of 56
Anybody got a good method for stuffing wings? I saw it once but every way ive tried they dont come out right. I cant figure out how tgey did it...I dont want to bread them to seal the whole for putting in the filling
post #43 of 56

Raw to cooked produces the best results but at my restaurant/bar we are very tight on space(nyc) with only one fryer. So we fry them at the beginning of service for about 8 minutes and they get finished to order for another 4 minutes until crispy

 

I wouldnt mind the extra time it takes to get the better results but in certain kitchen spaces it would bot be possible to cook them from raw. It takes about 13 minutes in my fryer and in that time we would have other orders coming in that would need space in the fryer as well... with limited space would not be physically possible in my particular situation. If you have the room to cook them from raw I would go that route but pre frying doesnt degrade the quality too much in my personal opinion.

 

First time posting on this forum. Hello everyone!

post #44 of 56

Thanks, Saucie.

Haven't had a chance to try it yet, but I will really soon.  Sounds good. 

Thanks again.

post #45 of 56


I just took over a kitchen in a bar and I want to serve great wings .I need some recipes.Thanks

post #46 of 56

Fresh and Raw is always the best ;) but you also have to take into account the equipment you have available to you.

post #47 of 56

Hello everyone.  I'm new to this site and find it very interesting and informative.  I manage a small pub and eatery that seats around 160 people.  We serve around 400 lbs a week. Of course fresh is always superior, but I have found that bringing ours in frozen precooked is much more cost effective.  We thaw them and fry for about 4-5 mins.  Saves all the way around. Saves grease, saves prep time, no worries about cross contamination.  They are unseasoned so you can do whatever you want with them...and our customers love them....We can also offer them at a price our customers love....win win situation.

post #48 of 56
I need some help with a chicken wing issue. Iv recently started working at a pizza place for some extra hours and noticed that they keep all there boxes of wings in the walk in cooler and not the freezer! :s I called the owner to ask Y and he said that their good for 7 days cause it's fully cooked processed wings. Just doesn't sound right and can't find anything online. Please help smile.gif
post #49 of 56

I have always liked cooking my chicken wings from raw. I either deep-fry them, or coat them with olive oil roast them in the oven turning them while they are cooking. Either way I cook them until they reach 145℉-150℉ and then I chill them. You can freeze them after they are chilled for later use. You can bring them back up to temp any way you want really, but I prefer to do them in the oven. My favorite way to eat chicken wings is with thai flavoring.. Ginger, lemongrass, lime leaf, chili's if you want that spice, etc.

post #50 of 56

I'm about to brine the wings and then cook them in the oven. Then Cool, then portion them, Then freeze.. to fry up later. We'll see. I think if you brine them they'll stay juicy. Not many people doing this way. This way it'll Save your fryer oil and cook time too. Win Win.

post #51 of 56

The way I've done wings at one place was to brine overnight, poached in salted water and let cool in the liquid, drain. To order we'd toss with cornstarch and fry. The brining process accompanied with a moist cooking method keeps the meat juicy. Good results every time. Cooking raw wings to order was not realistic for our set up nor did we sell enough to warrant it.

post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Swartz Jr View Post
 

... Went through 18 40# cases last week ...

 

Have you counted how many servings in a 40# case? Curious. I won't buy wings until this summer at the camp.

post #53 of 56

Roaster size wings you should get around 80 per 10# so 320 in a 40# case approx

Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

Reply

Whenever possible use local products, be it produce, meat, cheese, wine or beer! 

And local here means within the two counties near us!

Our guests will appreciate it and possibly return because of it!

Reply
post #54 of 56

Excellent information with accurate prices!

 

Chef, could you recommend some names of preferred vendors that supply quality precooked wings.

 

Thanks for the advice,

 

Marcus

post #55 of 56

Questions:

1.  What does "10# or 40#" mean?

2.  I have two of these fryers: http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com/globe/pf16e/p1348872.aspx

One of them is going to frying battered fish for a F&C, the other for fries.  Is it safe, practical, hygenic?  to use the other fryer to cook chicken wings as well as fries, i am speaking in regards to the chicken fat, because i don't want my fries tasting like raw chicken????

post #56 of 56
# means pound (lb or 16 ounces, not the British currency).

I don't cook other things in the oil meant for fries, just fries. That wouldn't make them taste like raw chicken but they might start tasting like fried chicken.
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