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Liver and Lamb

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am looking for suggestions on how to cook beef liver and lamb.  I am not really sure what wine or seasonings would be best or what the best methods to cook them would be. 
post #2 of 12
 The most important thing when cooking calves liver is to remove the silver skin. This is a fine skin around the liver. Slice it very thin and saute it at high heat for only a few moments. You should serve it medium rare. Of course be sure to season it with salt and pepper. 

I have cooked lambs liver but only one or two occasions when I was actually roasting the whole lamb. We cooked the liver with onions and some seasonings. We did not remove the silver skin.
Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
what seasonings do you use for lamb meat?  i thought rosemary thyme or maybe sage but i am not sure.  i really don't want to ruin good meat.
post #4 of 12
brianyjanell....

are you looking to cook them together in the same dish?
What sort of dish are you looking at, what sort of beef cut?

Need more information please

Lamb is really nice with rosemary, lemon and garlic,  ground black pepper, touch of salt.  Paprika, if you like it, really goes with liver.

But is it a roast or chops or....?  Any of those flavourings would work just fine,  go easy on the dried rosemary as it can overpower the sweet flavour of the lamb.

P.S. there is great information on here re how to prepare liver - do a search and lots of informed peopple with good ideas talking about it.
What Nicko said about calves liver will still apply to beef liver - good advice. I'd go a red wine every time, for my taste - a claret or merlot.  Not real sure how that would pair with the lamb if you are doing them as a mixed dish, could be ok.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #5 of 12
Not sure how to help you, what piece of lamb are you cooking?  What method of cooking are you using?  Roasting, grilling, braising?  There are so many recipes to share but why would I give you a recipe for roasted shoulder of lamb if you're planning on grilling lamb chops?

Liver - yuck.  We grill lamb's liver every year on easter.  Cut i n 1inch cubes and wrap in caulfat.  Grill and then spritz with lemon. I don't eat it but everyone else enjoys it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 12
What sort of lamb cuts do you have in mind?  Lamb shanks are fairly tough and do well with slow braising.  Rib chops are quite tender and are best when quickly grilled.  Leg of lamb roasts are usually roasted.  Ground lamb mixed in with ground beef and pork makes good sausages and meatloaf.  A few years back I did a recipe from Bon Appetit - you may want to go to epicurious.com and search for wine braised leg of lamb with garlic.  There are also many recipes for Irish lamb stew on the web.  There used to be this little basement pub in Salt Lake City that had a really nice lamb stew, and Bellhaven ale.  Quite a nice treat for lunch, and it tasted like it should cost twice as much as it did.

Seasonings that work well with lamb are garlic, rosemary, lemon, oregano, mint.  I despise that sweet green goo that people often serve with lamb, mint jelly.  A real mint sauce made with fresh mint, water, vinegar and just enough sugar to keep your face from a permanent pucker, that's what I like.  Lamb also works well with Mediterranean spices as well as some curries.

Where in Utah are you?

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
cooking them as separate dishes.  i usually use a Cabernet for red meats, i can't stand to drink it but i like the flavor it adds to the meat (especially with beef heart)
i tried braising the liver, don't know if that is the best way to do it or not.
I'm looking at doing leg of lamb, roasted.  more specifically to use in gyros (Greek sandwich, don't know if anyone is familiar with them)  we normally use beef and chicken for the gyros but customers keep pestering me about lamb and the only lamb our supplier carries is a beef/lamb mix, don't really like it so looking for something else to experiment with before using it at work.  if you have any suggestions i am open to trying anything!  our main menu sellers are beef and chicken gyros, smoked sausage and our veggie gyros with baklava as a dessert.  also it is a family business, so keep in mind we only have maybe 2-4 people working at any given time.  insane as it sounds with so few people it works out well for us.
post #8 of 12
I've been searching for a good yiros (gyros) for years in the places I've lived - really enjoy a good juicy one with tzatziki, onion, tomato on pita bread.  It gets kind of messy by the end, but hey.

Thoughts on Roasted leg of lamb:

I've heard of taking the leg of lamb, making thin slices across down to the bone all the way down the length of the leg.  Putting the spice mix (as per below) rubbed onto each slice, then skewer along the length of the leg to re-form it. Let sit overnight.

Next day, get it back to room temp.   Roast until done.  Let rest, carve off the bone.

There you have your sliced, spiced lamb for your gyros.  Saves buying one of those giant gizmos you see in gyros shops. You may want to give it a try, maybe not, but I reckon it would be worth it. 

This is from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros

"[edit] Spice mix

A typical spice mix consists of: 9 parts salt, 3 parts sweet paprika, 1 part hot paprika, 1 part white pepper, 1 part black pepper, 3 parts dried parsley, 2 parts garlic powder, and 3 parts of dried oregano. This is the base mixture, to which small amounts (a pinch each) of other powdered spices can be mixed (e.g. cinnamon, nutmeg, cumin, anise, coriander, fennel and most definitely some allspice). Some of these more potent spices can be added or omitted to taste. They are mixed and stored in a closed container overnight for their flavours to blend. Some of this spice mix is then lightly sprinkled on each meat slice as it takes its place on the spit. The prepared spit often spends a night standing in a refrigerated space, so that the meat is infused with the spices and onion juices"

Although, I'm not sure where the onion juices come from.....

 RE Liver
This is what you want
http://www.cheftalk.com/forum/thread/46764/liver-and-onions

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #9 of 12
Oh I see, you want some shredded lamb for gyros.  In that case I would skip the leg of lamb (too expensive for fast food - which gyros are).  Use a whole lamb shoulder instead - inexpensive, very flavorful, lends itself beautifully to shredding and super easy to cook.

I'm sure you can find a good spice mix like the one above.  My preference includes lots of black pepper, garlic, and cumin.  Lemon is good too.  Once you have rubbed your lamb with your spice mix put it in a roasting pan, cover it with foil and stick it in a 350 oven for 4 hours.  Don't look at it, don't open it, don't turn it, don't mess with it at all.  Take it out of the oven after 4 hours and let it rest.  Then you can begin shredding it. 

A good gyros has a few basic components.
1. toasted pita - brush with olive oil and toast in the oven or on a griddle
2. thinly sliced raw onion - red onion is especially good
3. fresh tomatoes
4. french fries - yep, greeks put a few french fries in their gyros, always have always will.
5. tzatziki sauce - if you need an authentic recipe I have one.

Gyros do not have lettuce in them.  I repeat, gyros do not have lettuce in them.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

i like them with lettuce, sorry but it just tastes so good.  we usually do fresh or grilled/sauted onions or lettuce and peppers, tomatoes with the toasted pita and the tzatziki sauce (have to do it home made!)  we did a trial and error at home to get the mixture right.  my mom puts more cucumber in it than they do in the mass produced crap, i like it better that way.  her's is also a little thinner, it won't stand up on its own like the stuff you buy in the store, spreads easier.  pita chips go great with it too, like a different version of chips and salsa.

post #11 of 12
You've gotten good suggestions and feedback from 3 members who are excellent cooks on this site.  Glad everything you do "works out so well for you" but why ask for help if you are not going to acknowledge anyone's advice, consider their suggestions, or even say thanks for their input?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

i know what works for me, but i know that is not all that works and others may know better.  i want to try new things and become a better cook.  i didn't mean any disrespect i was just stating what i have tried and that it worked out.  sorry and i do appreciate the help

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