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is making my own bread crazy?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
hey all.

i desire to stop buying bread for paninis in my shop.  is there a fiscally responsible way to make my own?

thanks,
john
post #2 of 20
depends on wether or not you have the ovens and hobart already. Otherwise a real easy  way to lower cost from buying bread is to get frozen french roll dough (i know) put in proof box, rise, mark, egg wash, bake. price out the cases and see.
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post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
i have a 1/2 sheet blodgett oven (5 racks) and a small hobart mixer (kitch aid)

john
post #4 of 20
bread is easy to make. It just takes time. Even imperfect bread can make a good sandwich.  I am sure there are a bunch of great, simple recipes on this site pick one or two and give em a try. figure out your cost and time and decide if it's what you want to do.
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
thanks gunnar.  i tried the no knead bread a couple weeks back.  i wonder how many think of that stuff as anathema.  anyhow i'll look up some recipes.

my main point is really in the fiscal aspect; i don't mind the extra time- it's the dime

john
post #6 of 20
well unless your buying REALLY cheap bread, i don't see how it could cost you more. your oven is already on, right? For the price of a nice loaf of artisan bread you could buy the ingredients to make 4 loaves. I mean it's just flour, eggs, salt, water and yeast and while the price of flour I hear has doubled it's still got to be cheaper.
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #7 of 20
i wonder how many think of that stuff as anathema.  anyhow i'll look up some recipes.

Not anathema at all, John. Lot's of people are making it, as it's become sort of an in thing. My concern would be making it work in a commercial environment, especially to be used as panninis.

Given your situation, I think I'd explore using various recipes but make the bread in the form of pullman loaves. That would require a small investment in the pans. But the trade off is lower costs for the bread, and more consistent portion control.

BTW, many bread recipes don't even call for eggs. Just flour, yeast, salt, and water. Can't get much more inexpensive than that.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jproaster View Post

is making my own bread crazy?


thanks,
john
 


   YES!  It is crazy! 
































  crazy good idea   I would think once you get your recipe and routine down things should become an easy routine.  Plus it's a great marketing tool as well.


    dan
post #9 of 20
Just to add one more thought to the equation.  What will customers think if they walk in to the place and smell freshly baked bread?

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
well.  they might say "are you putting coffee into your baked goods?"

"why yes" i'd say.  "the taste will take you to heaven; and the coffee keeps you there."
: )

john
post #11 of 20
Every 10 days or so I make a 6C loaf of country/artisan bread.  Total cost is approximately $1.50 USD per loaf using KA Unbleached Bread Flour.  Total effort amounts to 1/2 hour labor that's spread out over 4-6 hours of time.

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #12 of 20
Bread is relatively easy to make but for me it just takes too much time. I like fresh bread too, which is why my suggestion for you is to pick one up from your favorite bakery.  The bakery in my area makes fresh hot bread early in the morning and at around 3 in the afternoon.  So take a walk and get your fresh bread! 
post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
i would nichole, if there was one : (

the closest one is a good forty five minutes south. 

time is a critical issue which is why i am considering some kind of frozen dough.

affordability is key there

john
post #14 of 20
For the home cook, a food processor can do a good job of kneading many kinds of bread. Not for every type or size of batch but worth having a few in your repertoire.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
phatch,

i have a food processor. 

my initial goal is to spread my lunch menu over three main areas- panini, wraps, and quiche.  This menu would then be distinct from the others in the downtown area.

my desire is to make enough bread for about 30 panini a day.  i'd also like to explore the ciabatta bread.  i understand it's not as easy.  

i have a few bread books headed my way through interlibrary loan- Beard on Bread and a couple others.  should be here by weeks end.

by weeks end i should also have a workstation completed.

john
post #16 of 20

Phil, have you actually been able to use your food processor for making bread dough?

Even with the special dough blade I've never gotten it to work. A stand mixer really is a better tool for that job.

I'd be interested in the recipes and proceedure that made the food processor viable.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #17 of 20
These are all freeform loaves. You may have to adjust water/flour up or down to account for humidity, elevation and other local conditions.

I do a basic pizza dough in the FP, 4 cups flour, salt, packet yeast, 1 3/4 cup warm water, a couple of tablespoons olive oil, sometimes a minced clove of garlic. Process until the motor struggles (hesitates, about 45 seconds) A few strokes by hand to even it up. That's pretty successful. This won't do thin or thick crust well, but is a good basic pizza dough.

Another I do is from Marcella Hazan. 3 cups flour, 1 1/4- 1 1/2 cup water, packet of yeast, salt, 2 teaspoon olive oil. In larger FPs, there isn't necessarily enough dough to make a powerful motor hesitate so watch this one more closely, but time is about the same. Again,  a little kneading to even it up. 

I tweak this one a number of different ways adding extra flour to stiffen it up or doing a few dough batches then combining for the rise. I often use two batches to make bread bowls for certain soups.

Notice that these run about 50% hydration (if I'm using that term correctly--about half as much water as flour). That seems to be important for FP kneaded doughs.in my experience.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
just reading in KAF that dough can be made the night before and left to rise. 

if i were to attempt something like this, what might be a reasonable schedule?

is this a reasonable idea?

john
post #19 of 20
JP, that's a fairly common technique among artisan bakers. It's called "delayed" or "retarded" fermentation. Generally speaking, breads using delayed fermentation also use pre-ferments as leavening agents; and that can add an extra day to the process.

There are certain benefits to delayed fermentation. However, in all but a few formula, the dough isn't actually rising in the fridge, and you still have to allow it to rise. Retarded fermentation, in most cases, although producing a better tasting bread, lengthens the process rather than shortening it.

I really urge you to read some of the baking books, such as The Bread Baker's Apprentice or  Artisan Bread At Home that explain the science of bread making in understandable terms. After that you can turn to some of the professional texts, to see what you'll need for your requirements.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #20 of 20
Notice that these run about 50% hydration (if I'm using that term correctly--about half as much water as flour).

Well, yes and no, Phil. If the water actually was half the flour it would be 50% hydration. What's throwing you off, however, is that the formula is based on weight, rather than volume. So, in the Hazen recipe, for instance, what you have is 13.5 ounces of flour and 10 ounces of water, which yields a hydration level of 74%---which actually makes it a fairly slack dough; typical of flatbread recipes.

Based on my limited experience, I don't believe any home food processor has enough oomph to handle a 50% dough.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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