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Making fresh mozarella..

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
In my readings, I've learned that it is entirely possible to create mozarella from whole milk, and it is somewhat intriguing to me. What I am wondering, is whether it is something an individual should endeavor to do for any purpose other than the art itself?

Does it taste better than fresh moz. that is available in a light brine in supermarkets?
Is it economically viable to do so considering the price of milk?
post #2 of 8
Just for the satisfaction of doing it yourself, plus, it's cheaper. 

Plus plus, you can show off.  :D
post #3 of 8
There is a video on Chef talk on making fresh mozzarella, I made it in a demo class at CIA, it was a fun process.watch the video and don't over work the cheese, less is better, also watch the temps of the water..............I have been thinking of doing this also, I just need to get off my lazy as_ ,and do it. Good luck.................Chef Bill..............P.S watch a few of the videos on YouTube on making fresh Mozzarella, it is a lot easier when starting with cheese curds. Take note again about not over working it.
Edited by ChefBillyB - 5/1/10 at 11:16am
post #4 of 8
i have made some before but we started with the curds. but yeah the 1st time we overworked it.
Chef it up errrrday!!!
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Chef it up errrrday!!!
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post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post

In my readings, I've learned that it is entirely possible to create mozarella from whole milk, and it is somewhat intriguing to me. What I am wondering, is whether it is something an individual should endeavor to do for any purpose other than the art itself?

Does it taste better than fresh moz. that is available in a light brine in supermarkets?
Is it economically viable to do so considering the price of milk?
 

Read fresh mozz. you see setting in brine at the market comes from water buffalo and not regular cows.  It's color is much whiter and flavor different from cow's mozz..  And also mozz made from WB costs much much more that the other stuff.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post

In my readings, I've learned that it is entirely possible to create mozarella from whole milk, and it is somewhat intriguing to me. What I am wondering, is whether it is something an individual should endeavor to do for any purpose other than the art itself?

Does it taste better than fresh moz. that is available in a light brine in supermarkets?
Is it economically viable to do so considering the price of milk?
  
      Hi eastshores,

  It is possible to make your own fresh mozzarella at home.  I've looked into to it before but still haven't had the opportunity to make it myself, someday.  

   Fresh mozzarella is what tastes good.  As it ages it looses its flavor and starts to get bland and non-descript.  In the supermarket you'll usually find machine made mozzarella sitting in brine...nothing wrong with it...but nothing great either.  Sometimes you'll find some hand-made mozzarella, which is often times tied instead of balls.  Ask about how often they make them...many times it's made fresh daily.  Now taste the machine made variety next to the hand tied fresh and decide which flavors you prefer.  You may have better luck finding fresh hand-made mozzarella in Italian grocery stores.  The color of mozzarella will vary a little (from white to a slight yellowing) due to feed...I would suggest just paying attention to the color variations and enjoy!

    You can usually find mozarella in two main varieties, Mozzarella di Bufala, made from milk from domesticated water Buffalo and mozzarella fior di latte, made from fresh pasteurized or unpasteurized cow's milk.  Low-moisture mozzarella, which is made from whole or part skim milk...which is a common type packaged in grocery stores.

   Both types are certainly real mozzarella...but the Mozzarella di Bufala Campana is a particular type of mozzarella that is made from the milk of water buffalo in the areas of Lazio and Campania.  This particular type of buffalo mozzarealla get the recognized PDO (protected designation of origin) from the European Union.  Many other types of buffalo mozzarella may contain up to 50% imported milk.

   Any way you cut it...you want your mozzarella fresh.  

     I'll probably end up making some once the tomatoes start coming in.  I plan to find some unpasteurized cow's milk when I make it...which I don't think will be too much of a problem....but we'll see.

     best of luck...and let us know how it turns out!

  dan 
post #7 of 8
Wow, this could be a dangerous thread for me. I've only made a basic, somewhat bland fromage before, but now I want to look into mozzarella! Oh, this could be a disaster.
post #8 of 8
Hello to all, am new to this forum, home cook only but love love love it, the whole thing shopping for good ingredients, planning the meal, nothing quite like it, and of course eating the result, always looking for advice me,  so hope to be learning quite a lot from you lovely people!!

Am enjoying this thread, as a few weeks ago became interested in making mozzarella and ricotta  etc. and started to research it on the internet, so will be having a go soon.
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