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Braised Pork Loin in Tomato Sauce

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Braised Pork Loin in Tomato Sauce

 

Ingredients:

  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 4 lb. boneless centre-cut pork loin
  • 16 black peppercorns
  • 2 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1 large onion, finely diced
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • about 12 ripe plum tomatoes, cored and coarsely chopped (with skin still on)
  • 1 tbsp. fresh oregano, finely chopped
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1-1/2 cups vegetable stock
  • 5 to 6 sprigs fresh parsley

 

Procedure:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).  Prepare an oven-proof braising pan.

  2. Peel garlic cloves and sliver into thirds.  With a knife, make 1" deep incisions in pork.  Insert garlic.  Make more incisions and insert pepper.  Rub pork loin with salt.  Set aside.

  3. In a large skillet, over medium heat, sauté onion in olive oil until translucent.  Add wine and cook until liquid is almost evaporated.  Add tomatoes, oregano, thyme and bay leaf, and stir to combine.  Add stock.  Cook and stir occasionally for about 10 minutes.  Add parsleyto sauce.

  4. Place pork loin in a braising pan.  Transfer and pour hot tomato sauce over it.  Cover and cook in the center of the oven for about 2-1/2 to 3 hours, basting meat occasionally with sauce.  Pork should be very tender, and sauce should be thick.

  5. Remove from oven and let stand uncovered for 5 to 10 minutes.  When ready to serve, remove pork from sauce.  Cut thick slices and place on serving platter.  Discard bay leaf and parsley from sauce.  Scrape pan, and spoon sauce over pork.

  6. Serves 6 to 8.

post #2 of 26
What's the point of copy-pasting a recipe from another site onto this forum?

http://www.allfavoriterecipe.com/braised-pork-loin-in-tomato-sauce
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
 I am just sharing it, I placed the link anyway.
post #4 of 26
I just don't understand the point of copy pasting recipes from other websites in this forum.
post #5 of 26
It's also against the rules, particularly if it's not credited. I'm surprised the admin and moderators haven't picked up on this.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 26
I don't see anything wrong with sharing recipes.  This is afterall a cooking forum.  I think however that credit should always be given.  You don't have to give a prolorgue or anything, but a simple "hey guys, I found this recipe on another site and I made it at home and it's fantastic" would suffice. 

I think it's great when people want to share recipes that they have tried or have come up with on their own.  Cutting and pasting for no particular reason seems a little pointless.  Have you tried the recipe yourself?  Are you trying to prompt a response to the recipe or find alternatives?  What personal connection do you have to this recipe, is it your own?  What kind of responses are you expecting from your original post?  Are you open for discussion?

That said I would like to try this recipe out although it is lacking one vital step in the prep method.  Anyone up for discussing what that is?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 26
Koukou - the sauce is not strained - the tomato skins will be chewy by then?
No tenting under foil?
The sprigs of thyme are still in the sauce?....there's 3 at least

Oh hang on - I'd rest it for way longer than 5-10 mins - so 4?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #8 of 26
Didn't sear the meat...for more complex flavour, texture & colour
and I'd rough chop the mire poix, rub the sauce through a sieve & adjust....for speed & control
and no basting...basting also seems to involve no gain
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #9 of 26
No salt and pepper?  Fie.  For shame.

BDL
post #10 of 26
Haha, no salt/pepper?  What a gas!  I was actually thinking that it needed to be seared first for more flavor.  Right on Tito!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I don't see anything wrong with sharing recipes.  This is afterall a cooking forum.  I think however that credit should always be given.  You don't have to give a prolorgue or anything, but a simple "hey guys, I found this recipe on another site and I made it at home and it's fantastic" would suffice. 

I think it's great when people want to share recipes that they have tried or have come up with on their own.  Cutting and pasting for no particular reason seems a little pointless.  Have you tried the recipe yourself?  Are you trying to prompt a response to the recipe or find alternatives?  What personal connection do you have to this recipe, is it your own?  What kind of responses are you expecting from your original post?  Are you open for discussion?

That said I would like to try this recipe out although it is lacking one vital step in the prep method.  Anyone up for discussing what that is?
The site has rules about not posting  other people's material. Duplication of material already present on the web is intellectually dishonest, and needless. Yes, posting a link to the original material improves the situation, but at that point, it would be better to say, I made this recipe and liked it,explaining why you liked and what you might have changed. Then give the link.

But just posting others work doesn't contribute to the site really. And HMC, the recipes aren't your work to share.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 26
Bravo! Hooray for our members who know the rules, abide by them, and expect others to do so as well.

HomeMadeCook, you are welcome to participate so long as you abide by the community guidelines (rules) you agreed to when you joined. Please contact the moderator of this forum, or Nicko, if you have questions.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I don't see anything wrong with sharing recipes.  This is afterall a cooking forum. ..

But Koukouvagia, if you look at this "recipe" forum, on the first page, you'll find 10 different threads started by HomeMadeCook copy/pasting a recipe from another website with little or no comment. I find it annoying to have to sift through that to get to the good stuff.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post




But Koukouvagia, if you look at this "recipe" forum, on the first page, you'll find 10 different threads started by HomeMadeCook copy/pasting a recipe from another website with little or no comment. I find it annoying to have to sift through that to get to the good stuff.

 

I agree with you, I was just making the point that we're all here to share recipes and make conversations about food.  I also went on to explain how post a recipe and then make a discussion about it.  I doubt HomeMadeCook will make the same mistake again and if he/she does then just report the post.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #15 of 26
BDL & Koukou, have a closer look.  First thing I thought was no S&P too,  but they are there.
Kosher salt and peppercorns.

I am happy for members to post other's recipes, but need to give the reference for them, gibing credit where credit is due.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I agree with you, I was just making the point that we're all here to share recipes and make conversations about food.  I also went on to explain how post a recipe and then make a discussion about it.  I doubt HomeMadeCook will make the same mistake again and if he/she does then just report the post.

OK and sorry for misinterpreting your post.
post #17 of 26
My bad on the salt. 

Inserting whole peppercorns into slits cut in the meat seems unnecessarily creative and calculated to achieve poor distribution of the pepper.  Further, the loin (along with its salt and pepper on the surface) should be seared off before going into the sauce for baking.  At least I think so (and am not alone).

On the whole, the recipe seems pedestrian with nothing special to recommend it.  It needs tweaking to add interest.  Maybe cut the oregano down a little and add some basil.  A little sugar wouldn't hurt either.  For that matter, neither would most of titomike's suggestions -- mirepoix is a great idea, but I'm not sure anything this rustic needs sieving.

Also, considering how lean most U.S. pork is, the recipe seems like too much time at the temp.

Another h/t to titomike -- basting is a non starter.  If it matters to you, you could just turn the thing over half way through the cook. 

On the postive side, whole pork loins are relatively inexpensive, so it's nice to have a lot of ways to cook them (part by part).  You really can't have too many tricks in your bag -- and loin braised in a tomato sauce is definitely a good thing.  This recipe would be a good candidate to cook on the weekend and freeze for a couple of meals later in the week.    

The whole "original content" thing has a lot of merit, but there are a lot of nuances. It's not like she's copying recipes than posting them all over the web in order to support her own site -- which has certainly been the case with others.    HMC's questions and original contributions are make me wish I knew more about her.  She's so darn enthusiastic!  Just a hunch, but I don't think she's trying to plagiarize -- just excited about cooking and eager to contribute to CT.  

My two ryu,
BDL
post #18 of 26
I'm with BDL on the time/temp (160C trad.) for the relatively limited liquid (I wouldn't reduce the wine), the pan size would be important. Keep the meat off the bottom on vege or a cake rack as a precaution.Check progress on an R&D run for your oven's time/temp.

We do our lamb shanks in a 'similar' manner 20 at a time. Then strain off the vege and reduce for sauce and also blitz the vege, pass and tweak for a soup...boss is very happy we get so much bang for his buck!

Last winter we braised pork fore-hocks in a simple liquor, froze them, then straight from the freezer into the deep-fryer...Crispy on the outside moist and tender on the inside! This is an adaptation of a Filipino technique for a whole leg.
To finish reduce & clarify the liquor (egg whites) and flavour as you will. Reheat/crisp in the oven and glaze for 5 with a jam or jelly that compliments your sauce.

I'm with Shakespeare....there's nothing new under the sun. But I do get up every day to make sure the sun did rise for you guys tomorrow....don't worry, if it doesn't I'll post!
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
post #19 of 26
I'm with Shakespeare....there's nothing new under the sun.

Not Shakespeare, Ecclisiastes. 

BDL
post #20 of 26
Who likely stole it from someone else as well.

The Preacher was no different than any other great writer: file of the serial numbers, give it a paint job, and take credit for it as new.

See how it works. I could have stopped right there, and folks would have thanked me for the insight. But I actually stole it from Robert Heinlein.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
Sorry for everything, I did not mean not to credit those recipes and I placed a link to the site anyway.  But if that is still not allowable then fine, I won't post recipes anymore from any cooking sites.

And yes I did try doing this recipe for your information - there are salt and pepper in the recipe. 
post #22 of 26
HMC - no need to be sorry, just need to credit the writer/link to the recipe.  That's all the general response really is.  I've put my foot in it many times here, been advised how I should do it instead, and learnt from it, Yeah it felt awkward at times and embarassing at others lol.

 So you tried this one - what did you think of it?

It helps if you have tried the recipes yourself, and make comment on how you felt it turned out, what you felt could have been improved.  Please keep posting what you feel are good recipes that you've had a go at, or even better, ones yoou've come up with yourself .  Don't feel offended.  Its just advice - different people voice it differently.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Who likely stole it from someone else as well.

The Preacher was no different than any other great writer: file of the serial numbers, give it a paint job, and take credit for it as new.

See how it works. I could have stopped right there, and folks would have thanked me for the insight. But I actually stole it from Robert Heinlein.
Hmmm am thinking that's from Time Enough For Love b Robert Heinlein?
I am probably totally out of the ball park with that guess,,,,,,
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Who likely stole it from someone else as well.

The Preacher was no different than any other great writer: file of the serial numbers, give it a paint job, and take credit for it as new.

See how it works. I could have stopped right there, and folks would have thanked me for the insight. But I actually stole it from Robert Heinlein.

That's the old testament for you.  Plagiarism, plagiarism, plagiarism.

BDL
post #25 of 26
Hmmm am thinking that's from Time Enough For Love b Robert Heinlein?

Actually from several of his works; it was a recurring theme with RAH. Variations appeared, off the top of my head, in Time Enough for Love, The Number of the Beast, The Cat Who Walks Through Walls, and, likely, several others I can't recall offhand.

That's the old testament for you.  Plagiarism, plagiarism, plagiarism.

Too true. But leave us never forget the immortal words of Nicolie Ivanovich Lubichefski: When you steal from one person it's called plagiarism. When you steal from everybody it's called research!
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Hmmm am thinking that's from Time Enough For Love b Robert Heinlein?

Actually from several of his works; it was a recurring theme with RAH. Variations appeared, off the top of my head, in Time Enough for Love, The Number of the Beast, The Cat Who Walks Through Walls, and, likely, several others I can't recall offhand.

 



My copy of Time Enough for Love is so dog-eared it looks terrible...because I've read it so many times.  Was given to me many many moons ago when I was studying at university by a close friend.  Whenever i get a spare (rare) moment it is my first "go to" book.  That, and any of the Dune books.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
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