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poured fondant, rolled fondant, boiled fondant and ersatz fondant

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I occasionally make a boiled fondant to pour on a cake - i particularly like a white or sponge cake in four layers with sweetened whipped cream with cut up strawberries between each layer and poured fondant on top - i love the chewiness of the fondant mixed with the softness of the cream and the sweetness of the fondant mixed with the sharpness of the strawberries.   (Actually, strawberries dipped in fondant are special too).

 

I used to absolutely love eclairs, napoleons and petit fours that had fondant on top - whether chocolate fondant, in the case of eclairs, or white in the case of the others.  (i never find anything with poured fondant on it nowadays).

 

I had once made an ersatz (fake-o) fondant with powdered sugar, crisco (wince), i think glycerine, and other stuff from Rose Beranbaum's cake bible, to roll out for a wedding cake. It was decent, but nothing like the one i make by boiling sugar and water, pouring on a marble table and scraping. 

 

I was afraid to try that for the wedding cake because it was too risky and the quantities so large, but i would like to make a rolled fondant based on boiled fondant for more normal cakes.  For one thing, on a cake with whipped cream inside, the heat of the warm fondant that gets poured on it always risks melting the cream through the top layer.  On the other hand i'm not skilled enough to pour it on the top layer and transfer without cracking and wrinkling it.   Does anyone have any hints as to what I would have to do differently if i wanted to just roll out the boiled fondant?  Will it have the same effect as poured on top of the cake?  (I don;t want that "oh, what the heck is this, let me peel it off" effect).Will it stick to the rolling pin?  should i use powdered sugar to "flour" the board? roll between parchment paper?  grease the rolling pin? 

any suggestions are welcome.  I don;t want to go ahead and make it and then be stuck with something that won't work. It's quite a process in a home kitchen. 

 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #2 of 7



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

  Does anyone have any hints as to what I would have to do differently if i wanted to just roll out the boiled fondant? 

 

Will it have the same effect as poured on top of the cake?  (I don;t want that "oh, what the heck is this, let me peel it off" effect).

 

Will it stick to the rolling pin?  should i use powdered sugar to "flour" the board? roll between parchment paper?  grease the rolling pin? 

 

any suggestions are welcome.  I don;t want to go ahead and make it and then be stuck with something that won't work. It's quite a process in a home kitchen. 

 



As a trial,  next time you make the boiled fondant put some in a mixer fitted with a dough hook, add as much icing sieved sugar as necessary to make a smooth, pliable paste- or until you get the consistency you are looking for.   If this doesn't yield the results yo,u want, you won't 'be stuck with something that won't work',

 

If all is ok and you want to keep the icing, rub it with white lard and cover with cling film, this way it won't form a crust/skin.

 

Dust your board lightly with icing sugar or a bit of cornflour (you can put the icing sugar/cornflour  in to a square of muslin, tie it up to close and use to 'dust' the board.)

 

Roll out your fondant to required size, roll back on to the rolling pin and drape over the cake.

 

Forrm a 'tent' with the icing (pull out the sides) then ease the sides back in against the cake using your hands to smooth into place. 

 

You shouldn't have to grease the rolling pin if you are dusting.  The texture will be different to the poured fondant.

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeface View Post

As a trial,  next time you make the boiled fondant put some in a mixer fitted with a dough hook, add as much icing sieved sugar as necessary to make a smooth, pliable paste- or until you get the consistency you are looking for.   If this doesn't yield the results yo,u want, you won't 'be stuck with something that won't work',

Thanks, Cakeface. 

I just want to clarify something.  Are you saying that once i've done the scraping and the sugar syrup has turned into white fondant, then i should put it in the mixer, or that I can actually make the fondant in the mixer, pouring in the sugar syrup with a little powdered sugar? 

That would be really handy if it could be done in the mixer - i'd probably make it more often. 
 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #4 of 7

Hi Siduri,

 

Yes you can make it in the mixer.  Instead of pouring the syrup onto a slab, pour it directly into your mixer bowl.  Flick some water on the surface, to help prevent too thick a skin forming, (drops of food colour can be added at this stage), wait about 20-25 minutes or until temp averages at about 40C (it will be cooler at the sides) and using the dough hook, mix on top speed (it will take around 8-10 minutes or so ).

 

I would recommend adding a bit of high quality, flavourless lard at point just before the mix is ready.  The lard really helps the fondant become more elastic -making it ideal for rolling (it is hard to control the cracks otherwise).

 

Scrape the bowl and finish kneading by hand- adjust as necessary-if a large adjustment needs to be made this can be done in the mixer  (e.g more icing sugar or sryup, a deeper colour, more flavouring)

 

Rub the surface with lard  before storing.  Left over fondant can also be used to make fudge icing.  Good luck with it

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Wow, thanks, cakeface.  I wonder why none of my books recommend making it in the mixer. I will certainly try it.

Good baking!

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #6 of 7

I don't know.  I suppose most people buy it, certainly in commercial kitchens.  If I'm ever stuck for fondant this is how I make it.  I think its one of those recipes that is no longer made by hand much so the older method on marble was always included in books because it worked but hadn't been translated in to the use of a modern kitchen.

 

 

 Let me know how it turns out- would like to know- just out of pure noseyness.  

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

I will.  I may not do it for a while - am particularly busy these days, but next time i have guests i'm going to do it. 

thanks

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
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