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Lamb Marinade or Braising Liquid

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

This morning I was given a beautiful lamb roast, and I'd like to marinate and grill it or braise it.  I have a wonderfully, fruity red wine, an unlimited supply of fresh rosemary, and plenty of garlic.  What other ingredients might you suggest for the purposes mentioned.  A couple of recipes that I have (but have not tried) included some red wine vinegar in the marinade.  That seems like a pretty heavy handed way to add acid - any thoughts on the vinegar?

 

Also, I thought making some slits in the lamb about putting some garlic cloves and rosemary springs directly into the meat.  However, I'm concerned that, if the lamb is grilled, the inserted garlic and espercially the rosemary may burn or char,and cause an off taste. Any thoughts on that?

 

Thanks!

Schmoozer
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Schmoozer
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post #2 of 11

Other ingredients besides garlic, wine and rosemary?  Salt, pepper,  and oregano or marjoram.  You don't need more, not to say that you couldn't profitiably use a few other spices -- sage, thyme, cumin, mustard, paprika, chili de arbol and so on.

 

Generally speaking with lamb, if the meat is tender enough to grill it's too good to braise.

 

BDL

 

 

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was talking with a cook friend at lunch and she suggested cumin and chile de arbol.  Since there's cumin in the pantry, and maybe even a couple of the chiles, that's what I may do.  Not too into running all over town picking up ingredients.  Oh, my friend also suggested a few mint leave - maybe I'll try that idea ...

 

Thanks!

Schmoozer
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Schmoozer
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post #4 of 11

I always insert slivers of garlic into my lamb roasts and I've never had a problem with them burning, even if they're close to the skin.  Go right ahead and stuff as many as you like.

 

What kind of "roast" is this?  Leg, shoulder, loin?

 

I would give you an excellent marinade  with yogurt and saffron which is amazing for lamb, but it doesn't sound like you want extra ingredients and can make do with what you have.  Let me know if you want it though, it's pretty awesome.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 11

Maybe Schmoozer doesn't need it, KK, but it sounds incredible. Please post the recipe.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 11

It is incredible.  I'm sure I've posted it before but I can't get over how good this is.  It's from Steve Raichlen's cookbook How to Grill and it's a recipe for a marinade for shish kebab on a grill though I've used it for a whole roasted leg of lamb before and it was superb.

 

Saffron-Lemon marinade

- 1/2 tsp saffron threads

- 1tbsp warm water (to soak the saffron threads)

- 1/4 cup lemon juice

- 2 strips lemon zest

- 1 tsp salt

- 1/2 tsp black pepper

- 1 medium onion finely chopped

- 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

- 1/2 cup evoo

- 2 bay leaves

- 1 cup yogurt (optional)

 

.... hmmm, the 1 cup yogurt seems to be my own addition now that I'm looking at the recipe in the book.  No matter, use it or not but it goes beautifully.  Marinade over night for a whole roast, but if doing kebabs I suggest marinading for no more than 8 hrs.  The yogurt and lemon juice will break the meat down quickly.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I always insert slivers of garlic into my lamb roasts and I've never had a problem with them burning, even if they're close to the skin.  Go right ahead and stuff as many as you like.

 

What kind of "roast" is this?  Leg, shoulder, loin?

 

I would give you an excellent marinade  with yogurt and saffron which is amazing for lamb, but it doesn't sound like you want extra ingredients and can make do with what you have.  Let me know if you want it though, it's pretty awesome.


Judy Rodgers, in her Zuni Café Cookbook, suggests not poking garlic into the roast through slits cut in the surface, rather, she champions putting the garlic in the roast (in naturally occuring spaces) before wrapping and tying the meat.  I think I understand her position - she is, admitedly, a bit compulsive about such things.  Anybody care to comment on Judy's technique.

 

It's boneless leg.

 

I'd love to have the marinade recipe.  Thanks!
 

Schmoozer
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Schmoozer
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post #8 of 11

the only time I like to make slits and insert garlic is when I am dealing with a cut of meat that has a nice fat cap on it. Pork roasts or shoulders, A tri-tip occaisionly if I can find one with a decent fat layer..etc.

 

My reasoning is similar to the idea of using tongs instead of a steak fork for turning meat on a grill. I don't want to lose any more juice then I have to. 

 

I make slits into the fat covering just deep enough into the underlying meat to set my garlic cloves usually using a pairing knife and more stab then slice.  I will then crosshatch the fat  and rub in peppercorns and coarse salt and whatever herbs I have on hand (usually thyme, rosemary and sage as they grow abundantly in my garden, go light on the sage)

 

my dos centavos

 

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #9 of 11

I think Judy's approach makes sense for those who do their own butchering or semi-butchering. Except there's no need for tucking into natural openings; you're going to be rolling the roast anyway, and that will lock the cloves in place.

 

Most people, I reckon, when they buy a boneless lamb roast, get it already rolled and tied, and wouldn't begin to known how to open and rewrap it. For them, and for a bone-in leg of lamb, I think Koukouvagia's technique is fine. That's basically the way we've always done it.

 

Gunnar, while I have no evidence to support this, other than observation, I think cutting into meat when it's raw vs. when it's cooked has two different effects. I have never, for instance, had a roast that was larded with garlic leak excessively. But I wouldn't touch a knife to that same roast, cooked, until it had had a chance to rest.

 

Can I explain it? Not hardly. But I'm convinced that it's true.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post
......................... I think cutting into meat when it's raw vs. when it's cooked has two different effects. I have never, for instance, had a roast that was larded with garlic leak excessively. But I wouldn't touch a knife to that same roast, cooked, until it had had a chance to rest.

 

Can I explain it? Not hardly. But I'm convinced that it's true.


I follow much the same rules for the same wives tale type of science. But I have tried stuffing lean tri-tip and feel that it dried it out, too much heat getting inside was my feeling, so i only do it when i have  a good fat layer any more. 

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #11 of 11



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmoozer View Post


 


...

I'd love to have the marinade recipe.  Thanks!
 


I posted it right above your post.

 

I've never had a problem with cutting slits into the meat before I roast it.  I love those bits of garlic stuck in the meat when I slice it.  I cut deep to the bone if possible. 

 

The next time I come across a boneless leg of lamb I plan to use this recipe.  I saw Michael Psilakis preparing this on tv right around Easter time and can't wait to give it a try.

 

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/recipe?id=10202481
 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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