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Bread Flour vs. All Purpose Flour - Page 2

post #31 of 35

Koko,

 

It's been a couple of years since I last posted in this franken-thread, but I believe my larger point was along the same lines as yours.  That is, you don't need special "bread" flour to make the kind of artisanal, European-style loaves using the the same methods, equipment, and techniques which most of us use.  

 

Speaking of forever, it's been years and years and years since I've baked anything but pastry and biscuits with any kind of Southern flour at all.  If you get the same structure using the same methods, with White Lily AP and White Lily Bread flours, that's good to know.  I'm not sure where the rubber meets the road for the minimum percentage of protein to make open-structured loaves with ordinary kneading techniques; but I believe it's somewhere very close to that in the kind of soft flour which passes for AP in some parts of the south. 

 

The bottom line remains:  Whatever works.

 

BDL

post #32 of 35
This article on Cheftalk might help shed some light:

http://www.cheftalk.com/a/flour-which-kind-to-use-and-for-what-purpose

Flour: Which Kind To Use And For What Purpose

post #33 of 35

The article is nice as far as it goes, but sadly isn't much help for this discussion because it ignores regional differences:

  • Flours form local Southern mills tend tend to be softer than similarly labeled flours from local Northern mills;

 

Does not address the differences between certain national mills:

  • KA's flours, for instance, have a higher gluten content than similarly labeled flours from Pillsbury or Gold Label;

 

Does not recognize national differences:

  • Professional European bakers usually use softer flours for breads than their North-American counterparts; and,

 

Is not sufficiently specific, nor informative enough for the topic at hand:

  • I.e., which is the best flour for a given type of home-made bread made with a given set of techniques.  For instance, one of the more frequently asked questions here is whether someone who wants to bake European, "artisanal" style breads, and mixes and kneads by hand or with a home size (KA 600) mixer, should use AP or Bread. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 4/8/13 at 8:02am
post #34 of 35

King Arthur flours may, indeed, differ in their protein content but if you are in the Midwest, regular grocery store flours (Gold Medal, Pillsbury) do not. I've looked at the labels of the supposed "bread flours" sold in the grocery stores here and the protein content is the same as AP. The only real difference is that the so-called bread flours have an obnoxious yellow hue to them once they are baked into bread that has nothing to do with being unbleached.

post #35 of 35

Yes, I've heard that French flours are of 'softer' wheat and that's why I prefer using the White Lily flour (even though it's bleached) in my breads here in Georgia.  I use 5C WL Bread Flour (4g protein) mixed with 1C KA Bread Flour (5g protein) - the former for softness in the crumb and the latter used for a greater degree of elasticity and therefore ovenspring and openness in the crumb.   Mixed in with that 6C of flour is 1/2 tsp diastatic malt/malted barley for a slightly faster rise and again, a taller spring.

 

The southern flour is used to achieve more softness in the crumb that northern flours just can't reach in my experience.  And also as stated, the KA BF for elasticity and the overall spring rise.


Edited by kokopuffs - 4/8/13 at 10:03am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
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