or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Mushroom report - chanterelles, morels and soon Spring Kings!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mushroom report - chanterelles, morels and soon Spring Kings!

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

The SF Bay Area chanterelle season for 2010 was really good..jan 10th 007.JPG

 

 

I tried baking them - turned out very nice and when vaccume packed this way it froze well.

First I gave them a bath in olive oil, spring garlic, thyme, this wonderful citrus I don't know the name of and a few other ingredients.

 

baked chanterelles 021.JPG

 

Baked them for about one hour at low temp.

 

baked chanterelles 002.JPG

 

baked chanterelles 018.JPG

 

baked chanterelles 042.JPG

 

Here are chanterelles done the typical way - delicious!

 

Raissa's Bday 024.JPG

 

The morels are now in full force......

 

Morchella elata May 14, 2010 002.JPG

 

Morchella deliciosa 020.JPG

 

Now just waiting for the Spring Kings to show up in full force.


Edited by ekinoderminator - 6/8/10 at 7:15am
post #2 of 32

WOW!!! I'm incredibly jealous. Those all look amazing!

 

Quote:
this wonderful citrus I don't know the name of

 

Could it be a meyer lemon?

post #3 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

 

 

Could it be a meyer lemon?


I buy them from the local Hmong, Laotian, Cambodian farmers - they call them "grapefruit oranges" - I think it might be "New Zealand Grapefruit" also called "Poorman Orange" - incredibly sweet, mild acidity.
 

post #4 of 32

This can't be real.  If it is I'm incredibly jealous.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #5 of 32

is it what they call a mapo here?  The link is in italian but the picture is in english  

http://www.agraria.org/coltivazioniarboree/mapo.htm

 

it's the cross between a mandarin orange and a grapefruit

 

Those baked mushrooms look wonderful

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #6 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

is it what they call a mapo here?  The link is in italian but the picture is in english  

http://www.agraria.org/coltivazioniarboree/mapo.htm

 

it's the cross between a mandarin orange and a grapefruit

 

Those baked mushrooms look wonderful


That mapo looks and sounds just like it! Have you tried it? I am crazy about that citrus - incredibly juicy, sweet and great flavor. The season is over now so I must wait 8 months until my next bite.

 

This Saturday I think I'll find around 100 to 200 lbs of fresh beautiful porcini!
 

post #7 of 32

Just got some fresh Morels in at my work today Image(4).jpgImage(5).jpg

 

Using them in a wine dinner Sunday.

post #8 of 32
Thread Starter 

I did not pick as many as anticipated but next week should be really good. Here is some of what I picked yesterday -

Boletus rex-veris 002.JPG

post #9 of 32

That's insane. I live in Florida and wanted to try finding my own mushrooms, then I read about it, and basically even the experts that promote doing it, say don't ever do it without an expert, too many confusing species in which some may very well kill you. I am guessing you don't have that problem in NorCal?

post #10 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post

That's insane. I live in Florida and wanted to try finding my own mushrooms, then I read about it, and basically even the experts that promote doing it, say don't ever do it without an expert, too many confusing species in which some may very well kill you. I am guessing you don't have that problem in NorCal?



Northern California is well represented in the realm of deadly fungi - Amanita phalloides is the main species to weary of. Knowing which mushrooms are good or bad is strictly knowing each species individually. It is easy to get to know them if one is passionate about doing so. A good place to start is your local Mycological Society. There's bound to be good mushroom hunting in Florida.

post #11 of 32

I guess there are, we have something like the morels, we have an edible truffle, and we have a "florida shitake" among about 12 other highly sought species. My problem with it, is if making a mistake could be so damaging to your body, and possibly kill you, it's a little unnerving to have to do spore prints as the only sure way to identify some species. Do you do them each time it is questionable, would you just steer clear of any questionable varieties? No matter how much research I might do, and how certain I was that a particular variety was identified, I would have a hard time swallowing it even though I absolutely love mushrooms.

 

I guess I am trusting the mushrooms in the super market 100% .. and I wonder how much risk there is with the "wild variety" packs they sell? No matter what, your photos are astonishing and really make me want to reconsider giving up my own pursuit. I fish and garden here we have great seafood and good climate, but foraging is something that eludes me.

post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by ekinoderminator View Post




I buy them from the local Hmong, Laotian, Cambodian farmers - they call them "grapefruit oranges" - I think it might be "New Zealand Grapefruit" also called "Poorman Orange" - incredibly sweet, mild acidity.
 

Maybe a tangelo?....a cross between a Tangerine (mandarin orange) and a Grapefruit...very sweet but most noticeably really juicy! Believed to have originated in S.E. Asia 3000 yrs back so might be the connection to the growers.

NZ Grapefruit came from Australia as it wasn't hot enough for the usual varieties but is not particularly sweet, grew up blanketing them with sugar! Does look more like a Grapefruit than a Tangelo though...

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
post #13 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Titomike View Post



Maybe a tangelo?....a cross between a Tangerine (mandarin orange) and a Grapefruit...very sweet but most noticeably really juicy! Believed to have originated in S.E. Asia 3000 yrs back so might be the connection to the growers.

NZ Grapefruit came from Australia as it wasn't hot enough for the usual varieties but is not particularly sweet, grew up blanketing them with sugar! Does look more like a Grapefruit than a Tangelo though...



Definitely not a tangelo but like the tangelo it is super super juicy. It is very seedy and extremely sweet.

post #14 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post

I guess there are, we have something like the morels, we have an edible truffle, and we have a "florida shitake" among about 12 other highly sought species. My problem with it, is if making a mistake could be so damaging to your body, and possibly kill you, it's a little unnerving to have to do spore prints as the only sure way to identify some species. Do you do them each time it is questionable, would you just steer clear of any questionable varieties? No matter how much research I might do, and how certain I was that a particular variety was identified, I would have a hard time swallowing it even though I absolutely love mushrooms.

 

I guess I am trusting the mushrooms in the super market 100% .. and I wonder how much risk there is with the "wild variety" packs they sell? No matter what, your photos are astonishing and really make me want to reconsider giving up my own pursuit. I fish and garden here we have great seafood and good climate, but foraging is something that eludes me.


Most of the choice wild fungi seem temperatly inclined, i.e. warm summers, cool wet winters. Florida is unknown to me but I have heard morels do not fruit there. I would focus on mushrooms that don't need a mycorrhizal relationship but instead fruit on decomposing debris, e.g. Agaricus sp. (especially agustus!), lepista nuda (Blewitt), Coprinus comatus (Shaggy Mane). I would also focus on any indigenous coniferous forests that exist in Florida as a possible location for fleshy fungi that are choice edibles.

 

There are poisons in the animal world and plant world as well as the mushroom world - it isn't difficult to distinguish what is good and bad. The occasional poisonings are typically S.E. Asian immigrants that confuse A. phalloides with a mushroom that looks very similar in SE Asia. Personally, I pick Amanitas that are edible and feel perfectly safe on the ID because I know the species. In fact, my kids will be eating some with me tonight! In the photos are my kids holding Amanita calyptrata, below that the deadly Amanita phalloides. On top is a poor photo of A. calyptrata and some queen boletes. 

255.JPG306.JPG322.JPG
 

post #15 of 32

Oh for goodness sake - stop showing me all these 'shrooms!  Arrrghh Grrggg hehe.  We get nothing like the variety you have there, and in such abundance.  Pretty much all we see here (dunno what you call them locally) are button mushrooms, prtabello, occasionally straw,  and swiss brown.  And that's it. <sigh>  You can get dried 'shrooms of various types, but is nothing here as interesting as morels.

 

ekinderminator....I think you are on the right track.  At first glance I thought Grapefruit - the seeds don't look like any lemons I've seen.  I think my father lived on grapefruit for breakfast for at least a decade when we were kids, and it looks very familiar.

 

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #16 of 32

Thanks Ekinoderminator. I started researching again today. I plan to start roaming through the woods on my property, as well as going out around what luckily is a very large park across from my home that has 3 different forest types, sand hill, oak canopy, and hardwood. I won't eat anything at all, until I get to a point of being very comfortable and right now, I think my first candidate will be to find either grifola frondosa aka "maitake" or another in our area laetiporus sulphureus aka "chicken of the woods".

 

From what I understand those two types are relatively easy to identify and don't have any real look alikes that are dangerous, so long as you understand that they DO NOT have gills.

 

For other mushrooms I might find, I think I will still do my best to identify them, as I know the only true way to safely harvest and ingest mushrooms that have dangerous look alikes, is to know very well both the desired and the deadly and to know the differences between them. Thanks again for inspiring me to get back into this, I love mushrooms and they have good health benefits if you don't eat one that ends up with you being "kilt".

post #17 of 32

There are some that do not have  poisonous look a likes.   Where exactly do you live in Northern Cali? I have family in Grass Valley....

 

NAMA north american mycological society has chapters all over the US....they typically have forays for members and will ID shrooms.

 

Morels this late?! wow. 

it's hot and wet here, time for chanterelles to start popping....along with chicken of the woods, hen of the woods are slightly later, woodear, oysters, LBM's.....black trumpets......some weird blue bolettes....1997 was a very good chanterelle year, I'm hoping the amounts of rain are so prolific that mushrooms will be too.

Thanks for sharing....oh and try, tarragon and fingerlings with those chanterelles.

cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #18 of 32

WOW I live in a Morel state and I have never seen a haul like that well done.PS the cooking pictures are top notch, should be on the cover of Gourmet.

post #19 of 32

I went hunting today.. and found.. well.. I'm not sure what I found! These first ones are the most interesting I found. I don't have my fields guides yet, they should be here tomorrow. They look like a kind of chanterelle look alike, but they were hairy.

 

Mycology-Hunt-Beresford-Park-018.jpg

 

The gills did taper onto the stalk..

 

Mycology-Hunt-Beresford-Park-021.jpg

 

I also found a number of downed trees that had these on them. They are fleshy, thin, smooth on the underside with no gills.

 

Mycology-Hunt-Beresford-Park-001.jpg

 

I figured I could get started early exploring and taking some photos, then when my field guides get here, I can use them as samples to practice identifying.

post #20 of 32
Thread Starter 

.

Boletus rex-veris fruits in the Spring and Summer in the Sierra Nevada Mountains - the season begins in late April at the low elevation of 3,500 ft and continues into July (this unusual year it'll be August) at 8,000 ft roughly. The porcini in these photos are from around 6,300 ft and they were picked 6-27-10.

When I get so many I preserve many - most are dried but the very choice specimens I dry roast on a non stick then flavor up with olive oil, garlic, etc.


done this way they can be place in the fridge for several days and used in any number of ways. They can also be vaccum packed and frozen.

 

Dry roasted on a nonstick pan then given a bath in olive oil....

Spring Kings 008.JPGSpring Kings 002.JPG

 

Dried....Spring Kings 009.JPG

 

 

Here are some fresh after cleaning....

 

boletes! 139.JPG


Edited by ekinoderminator - 6/29/10 at 4:39pm
post #21 of 32

Nice boletes.We are having our season in Florida too. I have been looking around for them but so far the ones I have found are not plentiful and they seem to be attacked by insects immediately. The boletes, chicken, and hen of the woods are the ones I have been trying to find.

 

How long does it take you to gather that many? I went looking yesterday and the only thing I got was a tick

post #22 of 32

Ekin.. I walked through the woods on my property last night. We've been getting a lot of rain. I found some decent boletes, the big one was full of insects/infection or something. I am also 99% certain that I found a chantrelle! It did not have true gills, and the size and color were exactly what my books listed, and it had an almost fruity smell. I didn't eat any of them, but the bottom most bolete, I think was a good candidate for eating, it had the little white network at the point that the stalk and cap connect, which my book uses as a key characteristic of a Cep/King Bolete even though this one was relatively small.

 

Edible Mushrooms

post #23 of 32
Thread Starter 

Eastshores - please take a few more pics, the whitish bolete looks more like Boletus barrowsii. A few photos of the undersides would help in ID. Looking forward to it. If chanterelles and barrowsii fruit in florida I have hope that Florida might be a good place to visit after all! Seriously, I can't wait to get over there for some spearfishing and lobster diving.

post #24 of 32

I was going to take detailed pics of them all but my camera flash is broken on my nikon, and I don't really have another suitable camera. Thanks for the suggestion on the "white king bolete" .. that does resemble it. The underside has an off white tight pore surface which bruised just a tiny bit olive/yellow. I couldn't tell if that was due to so much moisture or not. I should have done a spore print.

 

You'd love Florida I'm sure. Since you have so many awesome mushrooms I will have to post my equivalent of lobsters

 

Lobsters

post #25 of 32
Thread Starter 

NICE BUGS!!!

I'm designing a float board (kiwis would call it an "icey plat" - though none exist) for spearfishermen/divers that hunt in Florida and other warmer waters. Basically it'll be a kayak like in materials float board  that will have a water tight inside which is insulated. Here are a couple of other float boards I am bringing to the market for shore divers in California, Hawaii and elsewhere.Sea Ranch - memorial day 2010 095.JPGSea Ranch - memorial day 2010 191.JPGnew board 3.bmp504.JPG


Edited by ekinoderminator - 7/2/10 at 11:46am
post #26 of 32

Very interesting.. I think the portability is a real strong point. How does one propel it? Would you paddle it out like a surf board?

 

Edit: I see in your avatar now how it would work. Fins! So it's kind of like a body board. Very cool. I think that would be popular in south Florida where the gulf comes in close. Up in central florida, the first reef is something like 10 miles out.

 

Also, how would it be anchored so that you don't surface to find yourself floating without your board? I guess a diver down flag would provide some extra visibility, but those ocean currents can sometimes move you far more than you realize in a jiffy.

 

Those are abalone on that board aren't they?

post #27 of 32
Thread Starter 

It would be anchored and/or attached to a floatline - it's use would be almost 100% for freedivers (which I am 90% of the time).a new part 005.JPGa new part 002.JPGa new part 004.JPG

post #28 of 32
Thread Starter 

Went up and picked yesterday and found about 80 lbs of boletes - 40lbs of Red Capped Butters (Boletus regius) and 40lbs of Spring Kings (Boletus rex-veris).Red Capped Butter Boletes and Spring Kings 002.JPG

post #29 of 32
Thread Starter 

Eastshores - I was just talking with someone in South Florida that found 3 lbs of Golden Chanterelles. I had no idea they grew in Florida. Apparently now is the time and they fruit under oaks there. Also, is the Central East coast good spearfishing/freediving there? Here's a few more mushrooms.

Raissa's Bday 025.JPG

post #30 of 32

Awesome! I found it growing under an oak canopy all by itself. I guess I need to seek out areas where there are large concentrations of oaks without too much scrub brush. How do they taste? I have never had a fresh golden chanterelle .. I read they are somewhat fruity? How would they compare to something like a cultivated white button?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Mushroom report - chanterelles, morels and soon Spring Kings!