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What are the three strangest things you've eaten in your lifetime?

post #1 of 99
Thread Starter 
If you're Eastern Indian, it could include a tuna fish sandwich!

I'll start (off the top o my head):

1. Sea Cucumber aka sea slug.

2. Pig's Brain, was told it was eggs when I was 8.

3. Raw, fresh water salmon. To think, I was expecting it to taste like sushi! (Stick to the fish from the salty sea!)
post #2 of 99
Sea Urchin...yeaccchhh!

Natto Beans-tastes like.., like.., um...oh, never mind.

A three-year-old pink petit four that we found underneath an old bakery display case. A little explanation: it looked as perfect as the day we unwrapped them and I won $50 on a bet. Tasted fine, though a little dry.

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post #3 of 99
Not on purpose, mind you, but I once ate the chopped up family jewels of a bull (floating in soup), and wasn't told until afterwards what it was.:eek:

Really beyond disgusting!!
post #4 of 99

NATTO!!!!!!

I second the UGH!!!!!!! on natto. The only food I have ever had that I will never, ever, EVER eat again. Indescribably ... not delicious. (I'd even venture sea cucumber again, depending on the sauce.) Of course, in my family a Big Mac is just as much the object of revulsion.:eek:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #5 of 99
Okay, here goes:

I ate fried squirrel brains when I was a kid in the South.

I have eaten sea urchin (eeeeyyeeccchhh!!)

And I have also experienced Dunkin Donuts....
post #6 of 99
Escargot- couldn't keep it down, though I suspect it was either the sauce or perhaps the fact that I was 14 at the time. :) I knew full well what it was- my sister and I both agreed that "I'll eat some if you do". I'd try it again.

Cow's tongue. This I bought at a schlathof in Germany. I always wanted to try it, so I got it and followed the recipe. It looked rather odd- I'm not sure if I cooked it right, but it was rather tasty. :lips:

some kind of goat cheese- hubby and I were vacationing in the south of france- got a cheese platter at a restaurant with all kinds of yummy cheese. Chris tried one and said I ought to taste it but it was a "little strong". Gag. Ick. Most vile, awful stuff I ever had. Don't get me wrong, I've had good goat cheese! but this particular kind (don't know specifically what) was awful. Bleargh.
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post #7 of 99
I shoulda known better than to read this thread.

<blurk>
post #8 of 99
you pikers :)

lets see - in the nagano japan area:

equine sashimi ( raw horse meat)

saute'ed ( on soy sauce) bee larvae

natto - all over japan - i even like it

in the osaka area:

puffer fish sashimi - deadly if not perfectly prepared

various goat cuts in turkey and jordan
post #9 of 99
Equine sashimi!?!:eek:
There goes my breakfast...
post #10 of 99
Natto~ is that the Japanese ferminted soybeans that have an outrageously strong harsh flavor...if so that.

Grey gelantinous roll in a San Fransican Dim Sum Restaurant, I have no clue what it was....then or 15 years later now.

well....I guess to a non-cajun sucking crawfish heads would be pretty gross....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 99
Durian fruit
Jelly fish
Seaweed soup
post #12 of 99
Can I add one more? :) There's this Korean restaurant- they serve dried anchovies with the other kimchi dishes...I mean whole dried anchovies- heads and eyes and all. My mother loves them. I tried one (I'll try anything once) but aside from the ick factor, they were way too salty.
If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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post #13 of 99
These items don't really seem strange to me but they appear to be strange to some of you judging by previous posts:

Pig ears -- not the dried out ones that you give to the dog.
All sorts of dried fish and squid
Jellyfish (yum! they actually go well with the pig ears)
Cow brains and other innards and parts -- same goes for cow
Balut -- but just the yolk part, don't even show me the baby duckling
Natto -- I like them also
All sorts of seaweed
Seitan and other meat substitutes (strange if you're not a vegetarian)

List goes on and on. I'll usually try anything at least once. How else would I know if it tastes disgusting?

*Oh the topic said three... I guess I can't count*
post #14 of 99

Oh, yeah, I just remembered...

I almost forgot -- I won a "Who Can Eat The Weirdest Thing at Dim Sum" contest once. I ate chicken feet. DEFINITELY wasn't worth it just to win the dumb contest.:rolleyes:
post #15 of 99
Thread Starter 
Of course, what is normal or common to some seems outrageous to others. The purpose of this post was not to gross one another out but rather to gain new perspectives. It's always interesting to find out what people perceive as their top three (or more). Sometimes it's out of curiosity, sometimes peer pressure, sometimes ignorance because we're kids, or someone didn't tell us. It's always intriguing to discover what some consider gourmet, others wouldn't touch with a 10 foot pole. Of course it can be influenced by where and how you grew up. Some people grew up eating these things practically every day and have never thought twice about it.

;)

marthaoncrack,
sea urchin? I'd love to have some!
chicken feet? I think the presentation is what the problem is.

roon,
cow's tongue? personally, I couldn't handle the texture.
whole dried anchovies? Usually you're supposed to eat a tiny bit with a mouthful of rice. This cut's down on the flavor saturation. Also why so many Asian dishes are so flavorful. They're not meant to be eaten singly, but rather with rice in your mouth at the same time.

daavery,
very intriguing... I assume this was all primarily eaten in Japan?
equine sashimi (raw horse meat)? where and why?
saute'ed (on soy sauce) bee larvae? where and why?
puffer fish sashimi? was it delicious? what did you think?
Have you had blue fin tuna?
various goat cuts in turkey and jordan? assuming you wouldn't list this unless they were prepared unusually...

shroomgirl,
Grey gelantinous roll? You inquired about this in a previous post didn't you? Was it savory or sweet? (Somehow we'll figure it out!)
"guess to a non-cajun sucking crawfish heads would be pretty gross..." assuming this is not an issue with you, "More for us!!!"

coolJ,
Durian fruit? what did you think? the aroma is supposed to be quite strong...?
Jelly fish? how was it prepared? It's delicious no matter how I've had it.
post #16 of 99
Oddly enough. Krispy Kreme doughnuts are too sweet so I don't like them.
Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.
Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

M.E.A.T.
Mankind Enjoying Animal Tastiness
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Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.
Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 - 1860)

M.E.A.T.
Mankind Enjoying Animal Tastiness
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post #17 of 99
Porcupine with red sauce ( as if it was with lemon sauce would make a difference)
Snake , which is delicious!!!!!

All the other things you have mentioned does not sound strange to me.
What's the matter with you guys and urchines???? I mean. I LOVE THEM!!!!!:lips: :lips: :lips:
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #18 of 99
Wierd things?

Natto. Certainly the wierdest taste and texture.

Szechuan alligator (in Atlanta, Ga.). Pretty good if a bit rubbery.

Pilot whale (St. Lucia). Stringy, fishy-tasting pot roast. Not worth the 3 hour prep time.

Duck's feet. Definitely wierd but tasty.

Win a few, lose a few :eek:
Dave Bowers
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Dave Bowers
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post #19 of 99
cchiu- the cow's tongue was yummy, but you're right about the texture being a bit- odd. :) Texture will do me in with certain foods. No nuts with my brownies, for example. But I didn't mind tongue.

I did eat the anchovy with some rice- didn't think to mention it, though! Most of the kimchee dishes are quite strong and/or spicy, so eating them with rice is wonderful...but it was still too salty for me- along with the aforementioned ick factor. :p
If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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post #20 of 99
not an issue, I quit trying to talk people into eating crawfish a long time ago....7-10# for an adult at a boil is pretty normal....

savory as I recall but it was really blue/grey and cylindrical....

chicken feet are ok, as are tendons....started eating them with Chinese friends...

Though the fermented soybeans used in sushi were rank....the sushi guy said that they were an acquired taste....not sure that's an acquisition I would want.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #21 of 99

These aren't weird to me but they may be to you.

1. Circe Bush Tea (whenever the flu strikes we drink this and it goes away)
2. Aloe Vera Plant (the clear stuff in the stem)
3. Chicken Feet Soup
4. Fish Eye Soup(told you my grandmas can't cook):eek:
5. Tripe
6. Oxtail Soup
7. Bran with Condensed milk (Hey I wanted something sweet and crunchy, plus my kids now LOVE bran)
8. Sorrell Punch
9. Soursop Punch (I think the Spanish call this Guanabana)
10. Gooseberry Jam
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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Jodi


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post #22 of 99
I know some people are used to the dishes, but the first time I had cervelles de veau aux beurre noir at a long gone place in Boston called Dodin-Bouffant run by a couple named Pritzker who then moved to NYC, the first time I had a humongous platter of calamari aglio olio (sp?)in Little Italy in NYC with all the little tentacles sticking up (I'll eat any amount of it fried), and the first time the kitchen manager made me eat a raw scallop to check it's freshness are my three.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #23 of 99
Hey, why do you guys not like chicken feet? I grew up eating them in my high chair, along with necks and gizzards (ok, stomachs). Of course, the key is: my mother would eat them, and feed them to me! She did not, however, eat sea urchins, which I also adore. In fact, she might not have known a lot of the "weird" things I've eaten even existed. But she probably would say, "Well, if it makes you happy..." Most foods do, except for natto!!!!!!!!! And, yes, Krispy Kreme which in addition to being too sweet are WAAAAAAAY too greasy. burp.:blush:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #24 of 99
My mother used to feed me chicken feet, calves' feet, brains, gizzards, hearts...

Yes, I still speak to her.:D
post #25 of 99
Culinarin247, I agree completely about the Krispy Kremes. Nasty! Lucky for me, too. Struck me as greasy cotton candy, if you can imagine such a thing.

I grew up eating beef tongue. When my mom cooked it, it'd be ready to peel by the time I got home from school. She left the job to me because, for some weird reason, I liked to do it. We ate gizzards and hearts from chickens and turkey, as they were boiled for soup. My grandmother bemoaned not being able to get chicken feet for soup, so I never got to try them. I'm guessing they're like the chicken equivalent of pig's feet (never tried them). We also ate fried beef heart slices. But no brains! And no beating cobra hearts, either. :eek:

French andouille sausage is made with tripe, as I found to my surprise, and bears no resemblance to the Cajun product. I have made tripe a la mode de Caen at home with honeycomb tripe; but when I tried it in Caen, it was inedible (tasted like bad breath smells). I have eaten a 1,000 year old egg (getting past the nose-ful of ammonia smell was quite a feat), and decided it wasn't worth it.
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post #26 of 99

A What?

What kinda egg was it??
Jodi


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post #27 of 99
Thread Starter 
ShawtyCat,

The following is taken from my post under the topic You Ate WHAT? Contest.: Gold Medal Winner

"Even though they are called "1000 Year Old Eggs" it only takes 100 days to cure them.

You should be able to find them at your local asian grocery store. They are usually duck eggs. They are extremly unique in appearance and smell. They look like black/grey jello with crystals (once you peel off the shell) and they have an extremely strong sulfuric aroma. (so don't be surprised by the smell) I find I have a craving for them once every few years. A tiny piece goes a long way when mixed with a mouthful of white rice. This would be one of those "acquired tastes".







Also called 100- or 1,000-year-old eggs, preserved duck eggs are a Chinese tradition during the New Year celebration. They are preserved in lime, pine ash, and salt for 50 to 100 days, then peeled, sliced, and served as an appetizer.
post #28 of 99
My mother, the special woman that she is, used to save the chicken heart for me, and only me, for helping her with domestic work so much. And I knew it was special because there is only one. She'd eat the liver and then slice up the gizzard to divide amongst the rest of the kids so that we wouldn't fight over it. I rate dimsum restaurants according to how well they prepare their chicken feet. Yep, organ meats are not too strange to me. Though I don't eat them as much anymore, I eaten tripe, stomach, liver, kidney, intestines, tongue you name it. And from various animal's too. I've also had bull's testicles, but they were not cut up into cubes for me. Istead, they were simply grilled with salt and pepper so I had the pleasure of eating it in it's full effect.

The weirdest things I ate:

1. In China, I ate these little black lumps the size of my thumb nail in rice wine. I don't know what they were but they looked like some sort of snail/slug that didn't have a shell. They were swaying so they were still alive, albeit, probably blessedly intoxicated in that pool of rice wine. Their interesting texture had me going back for more.

2. Dragonfruit. I couldn't resist the urge to try it when I was in Vancouver 2 years ago. It was flaming red with green tips. And when you cut into it, you get a semi-translucent white flesh that is speckled with black seeds that look like sesame. Despite its raging beauty, it tasted a little bland to me. Prior to dragonfruit, pomegranate was the only other fruit that has ever stirred so much anticipation in me (I was eight years old at that time).

3. The soup that Jose cooked up for family meal last week. It was like eating the scraps of everything on the menu only wet.
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post #29 of 99
This is really sad, I've been trying to think of the strange things I've eaten and I don't have any. The only people who would think so are my family members who eat the same dozen or so meals over and over again. Pomegranite, strawberries with balsamic vinegar, seitan(like Risa said-not strange for a veggie), brie, leeks, tofu, asian pears, and other very normal things (normal to me) would make my mother and sisters wrinkle their noses. "What is that?" "Eeeew". I guess the only thing that would be strange is cheese curds-for those of you NOT in the midwest. ;)
post #30 of 99
I too ate strange thing at dim sum, duck feet. It wasn't bad the texture just felt weird in the mouth.


I would never do eat this today and I still can't believe I actually ate that but in Finland I ate reindeer.
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