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Barbecued Shrimp

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

This Barbecued Shrimp is delicious with full of flavour: sweet, salted and spicy. You can make it in your kitchen instead of eat out.

 

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recipe video: http://www.bethecook.com/recipes/Barbecued-Shrimp

Ingredients

    * 1 pound - 16-20 per lb.- jumbo shrimp - shell-on - deveined
    * 1/4 tsp black pepper
    * 3/4 tsp salt
    * 1 tbsp ketchup
    * 1 tbsp brown sugar
    * 1 tbsp lemon juice
    * 1 tbsp vegetable oil
    * 1 tsp chili powder or sub 1/2 chipotle pepper and omit cayenne
    * 1 tsp cumin
    * 1/4 tsp allspice
    * 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
    * lemon wedges

Instructions

Step 1
Put the jumbo shrimps into a mixing bowl. Add 1/4 tsp black pepper
3/4 tsp salt,
1 tbsp ketchup,
1 tbsp brown sugar,
1 tbsp lemon juice,
1 tbsp vegetable oil,
1 tsp chili powder (or sub 1/2 chipotle pepper and omit cayenne)
1 tsp cumin, and
1/4 tsp allspice. Mix well.
Let sit for 15 minutes.

Step 2
Put a pan over a heat. When hot, drizzle a little water in the pan.
When the water disappears, Put in your shrimps. We don't add oil here because the oil for marinate is enough.
Cook for 3-4 minutes per side.

post #2 of 26

So the shrimp are shell on AND deviened. That's a trick you better teach cooks because deveining pretty much shells the shrimp for most home cooks

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 26

Man that looks good .... being a home cook I am curious as to how you can devien shrimp and keep the shell on.

post #4 of 26

I suspect it involves a a very sharp knife. I would lay the shrimp down on its side place a hand on it palm flat and slice from just above the end of tail towards the head. A quick drag with an oyster fork should remove the vein. Anyone that's actually done it feel free to correct me...but that's how I would go about it.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 

Gunnar is right, that is pretty much of it. Also, chef also takes out the "garbage" in the shrimp body...

post #6 of 26

A set of kitchen shears does the job as well. In fact, for home cooks, it's probably faster, and definately safer.

 

Start at the head end (where the shell edge is exposed) and cut towards the tail. Most of the time the vein etc. comes out as you cut. If not, a quick scrape with the shear blade does it with no need to dirty another tool.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 26

Chefguy,

 

Looks like an interesting recipe, but a couple of things thing have me curious.  That's your reference to "chef." He's obviously not you, but who is he? 

 

What can you tell us about the organization which originates the recipes you re-post here?

 

Inquiring minds,

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 6/9/10 at 7:48pm
post #8 of 26

Was reading Steve Raichlen's How To Grill (thank you, Phil), and he suggests that you can devein shell-on shrimp by moving about halfway back with a fork. You pierce the shell with a tine, loop the vein, and lift. The vein will come right out.

 

I think cutting the shell, with either knife or shears, probably makes more sense---if for no other reason that it makes the shrimp easier to peel at table. And, unless the shrimp are very fresh, more veins will break than not using the fork method. But thought I'd pass it on.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 26

The best shears for shellfish or small game are the Joyce Chen Kitchen Shears.  They are perfect for deviening shrimp or cleaning small game birds.  I stumbled on them some 30 years ago and sold literally hundreds of them to my hunters and fishermen in my golf pro shop.

 

Thanks for the recipe Chefguy.  I will try that.  Our offshore shrimp season in Texas is closed right now, and I hope they will be able to open it on schedule.  The situation in Louisianna could have a far reaching effect on the entire gulf coast.  I have no idea the impact on fish and shellfish supplies and price with the Louisianna fishery shut down.

post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Was reading Steve Raichlen's How To Grill (thank you, Phil)


I was surprised no one else suggested anything for that thread. Still, I like that book a lot and mine has been used enough the perfect binding is cracking and failing. I should buy a back-up copy. I probably cook the smoked salmon the most of anything in there. Good stuff. And I'm glad you're enjoying it too.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 26

Not to hijack this thread, but it really is a great book, Phil, and I've already learned a lot just by reading it. Time, now, to put some of it into practice.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 26

Recipe looks pretty good only thing I would recommend is put the shrimp on a skewer so you can turn them all at once and slide them off straight on a plate.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #13 of 26

Ed,

 

Why a skewer?  The recipe call for cooking in a pan (with no additional oil, the pan could be hard to clean).  Anyway, the shrimp are not grilled or cooked on a grate of any sort.  What makes them "barbecue" is the sauce. 

 

Of course, it's a disputable definition and the sort of thing that would outrage the posters on the barbecue boards I used to frequent.  But it seems silly to argue about language.  As long as we're all talking about the same thing...

 

BDL

post #14 of 26

So as to not have to pull out 1 at a time .They come out all at once. Then slide off the skewer in a straight line on the plate so it looks neat. I always try to cook my shrimp like this so they all start at same time on same surface. Grilling or bar  bq is even easier when skewed.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #15 of 26

"Barbecued shrimp" is a New Orleans classic. There's an old story, which might even be true, that a customer from Texarkana was trying to explain "barbecue" to a New Orleans cook, who went and whipped up something akin to this recipe. Many of the flavors are similar, of course, but fundamentally the cook just had no clue what "barbecue" meant. The result is terrific -- Paul Prudhomme's recipe in Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen is spectacular -- but it certainly has nothing to do with barbecue in any other part of the country.

 

Personally, I like my barbecued shrimp to involve a little beer and quite a bit of butter, and then you don't want to skewer them: you serve it in bowls and dump the sauce right on top. Dunk crusty bread in it. Oh, and don't shell the things -- you have to peel them at the table and get covered in sauce.

post #16 of 26

Chris!  Now that you mention it the recipe appears slightly cajun style.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #17 of 26

The first "Barbecued Shrimp" I had was at Pascal Manali's (sic) in New Orleans.  At that time (in the 1960's) that was their signature dish, and to my knowledge none of the other restaurants served it.  It was peppery with a ton of black pepper and butter, and it was plenty messy to eat.  It was well worth the trouble. By the time you finished peeling the shrimp and dipping the crusty bread you needed a shower.   

post #18 of 26

As long as we're all talking about the same thing...

 

Problem is, BDL, that with "barbecue" we don't always know, because of the regional differences about what that means. You pretty much have to know where you are, or where the speaker is from, to know what you're talking about.

 

In Louisiana, in general, and New Orleans, in particular, "barbecue" doesn't involve a grill. That's pretty much unique usage, not found anywhere else.

 

Below the Mason/Dixon line,  "barbecue" generally refers to what you eat, not the manner of cooking. In the South that means pork, and you can even subcategorize that into regional preferences such as pulled pork, ribs, and whole pig. In Texas, on the other hand, say "barbecue" and you mean beef, with most Texicans automatically thinking brisket. The mehtod of cooking is "grilling," not "barbecuing." And low & slow are the watchwords.

 

Throughout the South there are pockets that have distinct preferences which mark their barbecue. Western Kentucky, for instance, is noted for its use of mutton; South Carolina for its yellow sauces, etc.

 

In the Midwest, particularly Missouri, "barbecue" is all about the sauce. Low & slow grilling is the preferred cooking method, but there is no particular loyalty to the protein, which could be ribs, other pork product, chicken, beef.

 

In the North and upper Midwest, "barbecue" refers to the process and the event, and the words "barbecue" and "grill" are synonyms, as in "come on out next Sunday, we're having a barbecue". Everything for hot dogs to chicken to steak is cooked on the grill at a "barbecue," and low & slow not necessarily the way.

 

In your part of the world we find another unique usage. Whereas Louisiana does not involve a grill, you use a high fire and fast grilling for making barbecue---basically the other end of the continuum.

 

The long and the short of it is that when it comes to barbecue we are not, generally speaking, all talking about the same thing.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #19 of 26

The version I make uses butter and bacon, have to really get the cholesterol up!

post #20 of 26

KY,

 

You had a lot of interesting things to say, but I'm not sure why you're directing them at me.  I'm actually pretty sophisticated about barbecue, having competed KCBS and what not; and do not think all barbecue is grilled. 

 

On the other hand, I don't equate a saute with barbecue, anymore than I do a crock pot -- no matter what sauce is employed. 

 

I'm actually pretty loose about the definition, there's no sense in fighting with common usage -- you can only lose.  When I talked about the guys who are deeply invested in the online boards dedicated to barbecue as being a little more demanding... well they are.  Because people can be rather rigid about what they do and don't include, when I talk about things like "California beef barbecue," "Santa Maria style," charcoal-grilling, etc., I stick with the more restrictive terms.

 

Yes, here I did use the term "grate." I can see how you associated with "grill," and consequently with "grilling." I used the term as much to refer to the grate you find in a smoker as one you find in a grill.   

 

Anyway, maybe we should start a thread...

 

BDL

 

PS.

 

I'm not sure why I'm even responding to this.  Why it's important to me that you know I knew.  Respect I guess.

post #21 of 26

What defines a bbq? 

 

Too many definitions out there.  I always assume it is the method of cooking, i.e. over a flaming grill or over hot coals - and not relying on  a sauce/rub for the flavour, although they certainly add to the finished product..  That's just me and my Aussie interpretation of it. Bbq requires char and flavours, for me, depending on what you are bbq'ing.  But most definitely - char.

 

Back OT,  it sounds like a very tasty dish. you can de-vein a shrimp/ prawn whatever it is called in your part of the world and leave the shell on.  Leave the head on, grab yourself a bamboo skewer, separate the head just slightly from the body.  Dig the skewer in just under the "vein" near the head end and pull it out gently.  With practice - you'll get the whole thing out. If not, go between the other portions of shell and get the rest out in the same manner.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #22 of 26

Too many definitions out there.

 

That was my point, DC. There are so many regional differences in what barbecue means that we often aren't communicating because poster A means one thing, and poster B another.

 

The recipe that's the heart of this thread is a good example. In the U.S., Louisiana is the only place I know of that uses the word "barbecue" for something that isn't cooked over a live fire.

 

Or, to put a point on it: When you guys say, "we'll just toss another shrimp on the barbie," an American southerner could interpret that to mean you're going to top pulled pork with some shrimp. You're using "barbecue" to refer to the cooking equipment, while the Southerner uses it in reference to the cooked product.

 

So, as BDL points out, it is often better to use the more restrictive terms, so that people understand what you are talking about.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #23 of 26

BBQ = cooked low and slow over indirect heat. Usually cheap cuts of meat.

Grilling = cooked over medium to hot coals.

post #24 of 26

I concur, KYH & BDL.  We tend to refer to refer to here it as the equipment, not the recipe.  And just to confuse the issue some more  we have something called a "Webber" here, the enclosed spherical thingy with a hemi-spherical lid with adjustable vents at the bottom and top to control temperature, which you burn charcoal in.  This is normally used for roasts and veg.  Is that a bbq or not?  It's probably more like a smoker, as it is a fairly slow cooker.  Enjoyable by any name you give it.  I'm no expert - I just know they gather dust thru the winter.

 

But I never waste a shrimp on the barbie.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #25 of 26

Weber kettle grill. I own 2 they can high heat cook steaks or be used indirect for a slower cook. Not real easy to use for traditional BBQ like pulled pork or brisket that takes many hours (13 pound brisket can take 18+ hours) to cook properly. Great for making turkey, drape with bacon and cook indirect for 2 hours or so.

post #26 of 26

Webber is the same grill the world around, DC. Although backyard grills preceeded it, it was probably the first of the sophisticated kettle-types.

 

Because I do a lot of low & slow cooking, and smoking, they're not the best choice for me. I have a large rectangular grill with an attached side-cooker. For making barbecue, the fire is built in the side cooker and the meat goes in the main grill. Basically its a backyard version of the commercial pits.

 

Recently I bought a gas grill. For years I avoided them, thinking (erroneously, I must say) that they'd be no different than cooking in the house. But I'm mostly cooking for two, lately, and that can be a frustrating use of charcoal. I mean, kick off the fire, let the coals burn down, then grill a couple of steaks and watch that beautiful bed of coals go to waste. While the gas grill doesn't provide quite the same smokey goodness as charcoal, it's a pretty good second. Plus heat control is so much better.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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