New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Advice on a Culinary School

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hello all,

I'm currently in the I.T. field but am seriously considering a move to culinary. I'd like some advice on the best school to attend; money is sort of an object, but not hugely. My first goal would be to cook on a cruise ship, then own my own restaurant in Chicago or NY. To ambitious? Any advice / input would be greatly appreciated.
post #2 of 6

First off, I work at a culinary school in the admissions office.  


With that being said, here are questions many of us need answered so we can answer with your situation in mind:

 

Why do you hate IT?

Why Culinary industry?

Why open a restaurant?
What type of restaurant?

What role do you want to have with this restaurant?

Why NY or CHI?

Where do you live now?

See the truth about the culinary education industry at www.culinaryschooladviser.com 
Reply
See the truth about the culinary education industry at www.culinaryschooladviser.com 
Reply
post #3 of 6

Stay in IT school, get a sign on bonus, stock opts then you can setup your POS and network in your restaurant. This way when the bank doesn't't get they payment you can moonlight as an IT to pay the bills. If $$$ is an issue with school opening a restaurant in the Big Windy will never happen. A lease at a crappy location if 4K per month, now add the new health care whatever to the mix and you better have chef Ramsay showing up every Friday night. I hated (Strong word) Cruise ship sweat shop. You will learn zero and sleep in the depths of hell in the belly of the ship, you may get to breath fresh air about once a week.

 

Good Luck

 

PS go to J&W if you go get school and great Alumni

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies. First off, I'd like to say that I don't hate IT, I've just been in the business for 20 years and am looking for a change. I've always had a passion for cooking, but based on your replies, it may not be the direction I should head.
post #5 of 6

Wow, that was easy and unintentional persuasion.  We try to do our best to assist and guide people and with minimal information, how can one really advise someone.  In fact, I would say it is more detrimental to give advice without knowing details.  


If you have given up, good luck with IT.  If you haven't, answer some of my questions for better assistance.  

See the truth about the culinary education industry at www.culinaryschooladviser.com 
Reply
See the truth about the culinary education industry at www.culinaryschooladviser.com 
Reply
post #6 of 6

Cooking is alot of work, but if you genuinely enjoy it, persue it. Try watching a dinner service in a local kitchen and see if you can picture yourself working there. As far as schooling goes, try a local community college program. They tend to be smaller classes with some very intelligent chef's for a decent price. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home