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Okra

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I know not many people like okra but I love this slimy veggie.  What do you do with it?  Here's a recipe I invented just the other day, it came out very nice.

 

- 1 bag frozen baby okra

- 2 large tomatoes diced

- 1 large onion diced

- 1 red bell pepper diced

- olive oil

- 2 boneless skinless chicken thighs cut in 1in cubes

- 1 tsp chili flakes

- 1 cup white rice

 

1. Brown the chicken then remove and set aside.

2. Sweat the onions, peppers and chili flakes

3. Add the okra and sweat, then stir in the tomatoes.

4. Add a cup of water, the chicken, season, cover, and let it stew for 15 minutes until okra is falling apart and chicken is tender.

5. Stir in the rice and sautee.  Add water, cover, and let the rice cook threw.

 

I know it sounds kinda strange but it really worked.

 

TIP - if you want to limit the slime from the okra toss it in a little vinegar and let it sit for 5 minutes before you cook it.  Then rinse.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 14

Ya know, KK, there is no middle ground here. People either love okra, or hate it. Nice thing about all those who hate it is that it leaves more for people like you and me.

 

I love it all sorts of ways; even make an okra bruschetta. Here are some other ways:

 

BAMIA

(sweet & sour okra)

 

1 lb small okra pods

2 tbls olive oil

1 tbls honey

Salt & pepper to taste

1 tbls lime juice

1/2 cup water

 

Wash okra and pat dry. Top and tail it, discarding any blemished or hard pods.

 

Heat the oil in a heavy saucepan and saute okra 3-5 minutes, turning each od once. Add the honey, salt, pepper, lime juice and water. Cover, lower heat, and simmer 15 minutes, adding more water if necessary.

 

Traditional African dish.

 

STEWED CHICKPEAS & OKRA

 

2 tbls oil

1 cup sliced okra (1/2-inch pieces)

1/2 cup chopped onion

1/2 cup chopped green pepper

1 can (15 oz) diced tomatoes

1/4 tsp dry oregano

1/4 tsp ground cumin

Pinch salt

Pinch ground red pepper

1 cup cooked chickpeas

 

Heat oil over medium high heat in a saucepan. Add the okra, onion and bell pepper and cook, stirring, until softened. Stir in the tomatoes. Add the spices. Stir in the chickpeas, bring to boil, lower the heat and simmer, uncovered, ten minutes.

 

From "Wholesome Harvest," written by Carol Gelles.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 14

I love okra!  I am so glad you guys shared your recipes and I look forward to trying them!  My daughter will eat okra fried or sauteed in a little oil.  No one else in my house will touch it unless I put it in vegetable soup where they don't seem to realize they're eating it. :)  I love it in stewed tomatoes.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

The traditional african dish sounds awesome.  I will have to try that, I've never had okra apart from stewed in tomatoes or deep fried.  A much overlooked veggie.  You're right, more for me.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 14

KK, if you've never used it fresh, here are a couple of tips for when you're at the market:

 

Okra should be clean and firm, unwrinkled, and without spots. Most varieties are best when no larger than your thumb, but there are exceptions; Texas Longhorn and it's various clones, for instance, and Star of David both remain tender at larger sizes. But chances are the okra you find at the market will be Clemson Spineless, which is the most common commercially grown type.

 

To check for tenderness, hold a pod in the fingers of your off-hand and use your index finger to push on the pointy tip. If it bends, that pod is edible. It it's stiff, then the pod is passed it's pod, and will be tough and stringy.

 

Okra is relatively easy to grow, and is incredibly ornamental. It's in the hibiscus family, and it's blossoms look just like hibiscus flowers.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 14

Let me give you one delicious Brazilian recipe (from Minas Gerais state):

 

Okra with Chicken

 

1 pound okra
1 whole chicken, cut into chunks
5 cloves garlic, crushed
1 large onion

1 cup (tea) oil

2 tomatos
1 tablespoon turmeric
Pepper to taste
Salt to taste
Parsley to taste
Season the chicken with the crushed garlic, salt, pepper and turmeric
If desired, add a spoon (tablespoon) of vinegar
Let marinate in refrigerator for approximately 30 minutes
Preparing the Okra:
Wash the okra and dry it,
Chop it in slices (3cm).

In a saucepan, heat one cup of oil
Add the chopped okra and sauté it, be patient, because the drool comes out
this process takes about 20 minutes

Stir occasionally, being careful to avoid breaking up the okra
When no drool, remove from heat, allow to cool and strain to remove the oil
Preparing the chicken:
in a pan, heat two tablespoons (soup) of oil and fry the onion very well, as if burning (this will cause a drop in natural dye chicken)
Add the chicken and let it fry well
When very golden, add three cups of boiling water, or somewhat that almost cover the chicken
Season with salt, if necessary, and cook over medium heat, with the pot half-covered for about 20 minutes, or until the chicken is very tender
Add the reserved okra and tomato and cook until it is full-bodied
If you're having much broth, increase the heat and let it dry a little more
Make sure you are good salt
Finally, add the parsley
Serve with rice and fresh mush (polenta)

 

Sir
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Sir
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post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

KK, if you've never used it fresh, here are a couple of tips for when you're at the market:

 

Okra should be clean and firm, unwrinkled, and without spots. Most varieties are best when no larger than your thumb, but there are exceptions; Texas Longhorn and it's various clones, for instance, and Star of David both remain tender at larger sizes. But chances are the okra you find at the market will be Clemson Spineless, which is the most common commercially grown type.

 

To check for tenderness, hold a pod in the fingers of your off-hand and use your index finger to push on the pointy tip. If it bends, that pod is edible. It it's stiff, then the pod is passed it's pod, and will be tough and stringy.

 

Okra is relatively easy to grow, and is incredibly ornamental. It's in the hibiscus family, and it's blossoms look just like hibiscus flowers.

 

It's not so easy to find fresh.  Well actually it is easy to find but somehow it's never edible so I stick with the frozen kind most of the time if I want to eat it on a regular basis.  My mother grows okra, love it.

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 14

Pickled okra is really good too.  Awesome on a sandwich or as a side on with grilled fish.  I've had okra haters find it surprisingly not horrifying.  (I take the small victories where I can.)

 

--Al

post #9 of 14

Just for you, Allen (glances furtively around to make sure nobody else is looking):

 

Pickled Okra

 

3 1/2 lbs small okra pods

4 cloves garlic

2 small hot peppers, halved

3 cups water

3 cups white vinegar

1/3 cup canning salt

2 tsp dill seed

 

Pack okra firmly into hot pint jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Put a garlic clove and a half pepper in each jar.

 

Combine water, vinegar, salt, and dill and bring to a boil. Pour hot liquid over okra, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles. Adjust caps.

 

Process 15 minutes in boiling water bath.

 

Yield: About 4 pints.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 14

Thanks!  I like the dill idea. One of those "how did I not think of that?" things. 

 

Cheers,

 

Al

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

I recently had an okra appetizer come to think of it.  It was a pickled okra, stuffed with cream cheese and smoked salmon and then cut into little rings.  It was hopelessly beautiful and tasted quite good although I'm not a fan of anything pickled.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 14

I love Pickled Okra & my take on it is.....

 

2/3 cup cidar vinegar

2 tbsp Kosher Salt (I Like) or Pickling Salt

1/3 cup water

22-25 small fingers of Okra

3 small hot peppers your choice ( I like to use scotch bonnets ..a little to much for some!)

1 tbsp dill seeds

1/2 tbsp mustard seeds

3 garlic cloves

 

Combine vinegar, salt and water to a hard boil on high heat. Meanwhile place a few fingers of Okra, garlic clove,hot pepper, evenly distribute dill and mustard seeds in each sterilized hot jar.

Pour the hot vinegar mixture into jars.

Allow the jars to cool  , then put on lids tightly and store in a cool place for at least a week

 

Presto ...you may convert some Okra haters with this one!

 

Oh The African dish I love to make is Gumbo ....  but that's another recipe ...(Get back to you on that one ..gotta fly)

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post #13 of 14

Sounds good, Gypsy. I reckon the cider vinegar, particularly, gives it a deeper flavor.

 

What do you mean, though, by "a few fingers....." Don't you just fill the jars with them?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 14

Well yes, I guess I wasn't too specific on that one. I am such a hands on type of Gal. I would love to write my own cook- book one day ( there are, too many on the shelves these days anyhow...lol)  People ask me for recipes all the time and always call back later with " well what about this ..I don't understand this..."

 

You are correct Sir...Fill the Jar! 

 

Excuse the lazy recipe.....

 

Gypsy

My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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