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Pasta brands

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

What kind of pasta do you buy and recommend? 

 

I am a Barilla fan with DelVerde being a close second.  I had a terrible experience last night with DeCecco.  The market was out of Barilla angel hair so I bought DeCecco cappellini.  I'm not opposed to trying new things and what's the harm really?  Well 2 minutes into cooking this cappellini was already mushy and not at all al dente!  I'm so angry.  I've tried other brands too.  San Giorgio doesn't taste very good, and other brands taste too floury. 

 

I will admit that Buitoni Wild Mushroom Agnolotti is insanely good but I'm a little suspicious of a stuffed pasta that can sit in my fridge for 6 weeks and I vow not to buy them again.

 

I am THIS close to making my own pasta.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 25

I don't like DeCecco much either. Prince is very reliable, but the taste is very much its own -- think school lunch hot dish, OK?

 

Making your own pasta is easy and satisfying, but it's not really a solution to the problem, because the stuff you'll make will almost certainly be flat sheet-noodles like fettuccine and such, not dry macaroni-style noodles. You can do the latter if you buy a pasta machine, the kind with a set of dies that press the noodles into appropriate shapes, but I've read wildly varying accounts of just how well it really works with an ordinary home-style machine. (Never tried it myself.) These two kinds of pasta taste and feel quite different, and can't be perfectly substituted one for the other. That said, good homemade sheet noodles are so good you may find yourself changing which pasta dishes you favor just because of the noodles!

post #3 of 25

One thing to consider, KK, that the literature seems to leave out: Making pasta means you need a big prep table or lots of counter space.

 

Didn't realize that when I bought my machine.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 25

Why does using a pasta machine require so much space, KY?

post #5 of 25

It's not the machine, Chris. Mine only takes up a space about 5 x 7 inches.

 

But you need room to lay out (and flour) the progressively longer and longer ribbons of pasta dough as they're rolled out of the machine.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 25

I like Barilla - but tend to make my own when I've got time!

post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

It's not the machine, Chris. Mine only takes up a space about 5 x 7 inches.

 

But you need room to lay out (and flour) the progressively longer and longer ribbons of pasta dough as they're rolled out of the machine.


Oh, that. You can minimize this by feeding it out to hang over your arm, if you prefer, but it does make a bit of a mess.

 

Anyone have any experience with dry pasta press-type machines, for making macaroni and such?

post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer View Post


Oh, that. You can minimize this by feeding it out to hang over your arm, if you prefer, but it does make a bit of a mess.


When I make fresh pasta, I sprinkle flour on it occasionally between progressively thinner rollings. To do this I need quite a bit more working surface than the machine itself takes up. Maybe I could learn something about your method.

post #9 of 25

That's the mess I'm talking about, Yeti. Basically once it's hanging on your left arm (assuming you're a righty), you just pick up some flour in your right hand and kind of brush it on one side of the pasta, over the sink. Then kind of pass the pasta sheet through your hands so it's more or less evenly coated, and it's ready to go back in the machine. The area around the sink will end up with a fine dusting of flour, of course. But yes, the point is well taken: rolling pasta does take some real estate.

post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

I have a tiny kitchen island and I could clear up the counter space to do this but it sounds like a really messy process with flour everywhere.  I'm hoping for a kitchen renovation in the next couple of years but I don't want to put off making pasta till then.

 

I watched Molto Mario the other day (it's back on the Cooking Channel!) make a lasagne bolognese using sheets of fresh spinach pasta and I'm dying to make it happen.

 

It looks like we're all in agreement, Barilla is the best dry pasta on the market.  Does anyone use the fresh pastas sold in groceries?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #11 of 25

It's not an especially messy process if you have counter space -- just put a couple of lightly-floured sheet pans to the left of the machine and roll the noodles onto those. That keeps the flour on the pans. It really shouldn't be any messier than making a pie.

 

Fresh pasta in the grocery store is entirely dependent on the brand and how it's been treated by the store. Sometimes it's very good indeed, sometimes it's dreadful. But if the choice is dry lasagne vs. fresh sheets that might or might not be OK, I'd try the fresh. What have you got to lose?

post #12 of 25

I like Barilla as well. They have a great selection. The special "home made" and traditional/regional lines are my favorites, but even the plain rigatoni, pennette and spaghettini are just great! As far as De Cecco I don't buy it often but I think it's a good pasta.

Another commercial brand I would recommend is Garofalo.  Of course the best pasta is the so called "pasta artiginale" that you can get in Italy in their small shops!

post #13 of 25

I recommend Garofalo and Rummo.

I don't love pasta Barilla, and the barilla for the USA market has a lower quality than Barilla for the italian market

But if you want the top of the pasta you should try "Setaro" or Cav. Giuseppe Cocco.

The last 2 are expensive, but are a lot better than other pastas you can find in USA

post #14 of 25

we use barilla and decceco for some at work. barilla makes certain good pastas and decceco make theirs. i love making fresh pasta, its really easy and why not you can make your own ravioli and freeze it, and use it when ever. i do that at home. at work we make it fresh and use it that day.

Chef it up errrrday!!!
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Chef it up errrrday!!!
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post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 

To make fresh pasta at home must you always put egg in it?  If so then what's the difference between regular pasta and egg noodles?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #16 of 25


Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

To make fresh pasta at home must you always put egg in it?  If so then what's the difference between regular pasta and egg noodles?


Dear Koukouvagia, You've set up a false dichotomy. 

 

You certaily can make noodles at home without egg. 

 

But nearly all Italian style "pasta" does have egg on it, packaged or otherwise; so there's no "difference between regular pasta and egg noodles."

 

Completely off the subject, allow me to say I found your conversation with Free Rider in another thread very illuminating.  I'd always enjoyed your online personality, but now like it even more.  Brava!

 

BDL

post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post


Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post


Dear Koukouvagia, You've set up a false dichotomy. 

 

You certaily can make noodles at home without egg. 

 

But nearly all Italian style "pasta" does have egg on it, packaged or otherwise; so there's no "difference between regular pasta and egg noodles."

 

Completely off the subject, allow me to say I found your conversation with Free Rider in another thread very illuminating.  I'd always enjoyed your online personality, but now like it even more.  Brava!

 

BDL


Thanks, I always thought that egg was present no matter what the pasta.  I guess I figured that regular pasta has eggs in it but egg noodles have more eggs in them lol.

 

I'm not sure what conversation you're refering to but I'm glad I came off in a good light.
 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #18 of 25

I'm not sure what conversation you're refering to but I'm glad I came off in a good light.

 


Your exchange with Fr33 Rider on "What Can a Server Do..."

 

BDL

post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 

Ahh yes.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #20 of 25

My favorite pasta is what I make with just semolina and water. No eggs needed.

 

Nothing at all wrong with egg in in. But it's also not a necessary ingredient.


Edited by OregonYeti - 7/5/10 at 9:36pm
post #21 of 25

I sometimes make  my own pasta but it is time stealing so I just use Barilla too.

post #22 of 25

What are some good brands for organic pasta without eggs?

 

My favorite is Garden Time, but I have a hard time finding it in local stores.

 

I'd like to know if there are others people recommend.

 

I know I'm not going to make my own, so I just need to find a few good ones that I can buy in a store.  I've tried several of the brands at Whole Foods, but haven't liked any of them.  Garden Time is only available at co-ops which are a good 25-30 miles from where I live.

post #23 of 25
Hey All,

 

resurfacing this old thread to ask the exact the same question.

 

Quote:

 

I recommend Garofalo and Rummo.

I don't love pasta Barilla, and the barilla for the USA market has a lower quality than Barilla for the italian market

But if you want the top of the pasta you should try "Setaro" or Cav. Giuseppe Cocco.

The last 2 are expensive, but are a lot better than other pastas you can find in USA

 

 

Thanks for the advice!

 

Agree about Barilla. In Italy it is considered relatively low end. Back when I was a kid in the 80's I found a cockroach in a bag of Barilla penne.

 

De Cecco is one step up, along side Voiello. But they overcook if you don't eat them immediately after draining.

 

A few weeks ago in an Italian restaurant, I was pleasantly surprised to eat GOOD pasta, cooked to perfection, from a BUFFET, which I did not think was possible, and I'm now looking for something better than De Cecco.

 

I'll try Garofalo, Rummo, Setaro and Giuseppe Cocco.

 

Talk soon!

post #24 of 25
post #25 of 25

I buy De Cecco all the time and have no issues with it.  Great taste, great texture, never mushy, or gummy.  I cook to el dente and finish in my sauce.

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