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The next food network star?? Surely your kidding

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Yesterday TV offered very little so I put food network on. The show I got at the time I put it on was the next food network star.  All I can say is Heaven help us. 2 of these people said they were culinary instructors, another an unemployed chef, a caterer, another chef and so on. Well the both instructors were the pits . One made a chicken roulllade that was totally raw, the other made something that shall remain simply as a question mark, they need to go to school. Another mixed caramel popcorn with chicken as an entree.The chef worked like a slob. Some had no knife skills at all .However there were  2 girls and one guy who  were passable.. The rest should be CHOPPED.( on another station)

. I realize that this program hides under the guise of entertainment, but why not just let it be plumbing or carpentry not cooking. Maybe these people can do that  better then cook The public deserves better. . Between Big Daddy, The Barefoot Chic, The one who buys everything already made Sandra something ,but she is attractive where are we going. ? There are a number of accomplished chefs on this station , but gradually they are all leaving IE Mario  ,Emeril etc. and I don't blame them. The station is simply looking for the next pretty face who can talk while they cook.. And with Flay as a judge? I can't help this rant but it takes years to EARN the title Chef and believe me most of the guys and girls who eearned it paid their dues.. These future stars? I don't know..

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #2 of 10

I've seen every one of those competitions, Ed, and have to say this is, collectively, the most talentless group they've ever had. Most of them don't have the cooking chops, it's true. But they're afraid of the camera as well.

 

I wonder what kind of ego it takes to willingly embarrass yourself like that?

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 10

You said it Ed: "future STARS".

 

They're not looking for "chefs" nor are they looking for someone to teach cooking.

 

They're looking for entertainment (a future FoodTV host/ess) while providing some entertainment.  Subject minutes counted during a 1-hour show:

 

"Personal drama/emotions (including judges psychologizing)" -- 40 minutes

 

"Actual cooking with the potential to be instructional/inspirational" -- 8 minutes.

 

"Commercials without/within" -- 12 minutes

 

Have you wondered what's become of the past years' winners?  All gone except for Guy Fieri (season 1, 2?) and last year's winner who has this season to sink or swim.

 

Michael Pollan wrote a great article on the agenda of the FoodTV producers a year or two ago.  FoodTV is no longer about food instruction, quality or nutrition.  It's about ratings.  It's about selling food (yeah, directly through commercials and indirectly).

 

I think the subject of FoodTV has been covered within hundreds of posts in this forum.  The overwhelming consensus is negative.

 

We're simply not their audience.

 

Joe

post #4 of 10

Well I am just a lowly home cook and to be honest I used to love watching Food Network but about the only thing that they show anymore is the challenges which I cannot stand to watch .... there is now another "Cooking" channel that's on now that isn't too bad though and from what few shows that I have seen they have been fairly informative.

post #5 of 10

It's not the Food Network, it's the All Saute' All the Time Channel (when there's not some damn cake decorating show on).  Emeril had the only show where one might actually see something done with a little finesse: a sear and finish in the oven technique, a braise, something stewed, something poached, or maybe even cooked in a bain marie  - or anything else that didn't involve high heat and a lot of pan-shaking.

 

It only takes a slightly above average idiot to throw everything in a pan and turn the burner up as loud as it'll go and "rock out the service."  What a load of horseshit.

 

I've worked in European kitchens where you could still hear a pot simmering in the middle of the rush.  Chaos does not good cuisine make.


Edited by CStanford - 6/15/10 at 7:37am
post #6 of 10

Since they stopped showing Molto Mario and Essence of Emeril(I hate the live Emeril bam show), I rarely watch the Food Network anymore. The only show I enjoy anymore is Chopped, and even that is getting a little old.

 

I did happen to watch the New FN Star last night as well, only part of it actually, and there are definitely no standouts. The FN network has become such a reality show that they had to start a new channel for cooking.

 

If you want to see real chefs cooking, you have to watch PBS' Create channel.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

One thing I must say is the Cake Boss guy knows his stuff. The guy is a fanatic, but you have to be, to do it right. He has a natural in his hands  decorating talent. that you are born with I have had the pleasure of meeting a few pastry chefs like this when I was in New York.many years ago IE Clement Maggio( The White House), Joe Lancianni(The Plaza,Joe Tarantino ( also The Plaza ), Charlie Mengel (The Stork Club).He fools around a lot but thats part of the produced and directed by part of the show. I give credit where credit is do, Buddy knows how to decorate cakes, and he works clean and neat. The Right Way.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #8 of 10

Yep,  but yellow-cake-mix-and-fondant Harley Davidson motorcycles are entertaining only up to a point.  For me at least.

post #9 of 10

I see cooking shows as what they are, people preforming not cooking. To watch a good chef is like watching Golf or Bowling if you don't do it you don't appreciate how hard it really is. When you are really good and you are on target all of the time it is boring to watch. I do get good ideas once in a while, but most of my inspiration comes from reading and trying new recipes. To me the excitement is in the eating not the cooking. Eating is not good TV because you don't have those senses available to you with that genera. I love to cook but it is boring to watch someone else prep. Cooking is like a chess match, most of the action is going on between your ears, or like a duck on a pond as it moves smoothly across a lake, the real work is going on under the water. I really liked the show ware the people who couldn't cook showed how difficult it really is. I forgot the name of the show but two accomplished chefs gave a demonstration of a dish and the contestants had to reproduce it on their own in a competition. That was good TV to see someone doing the best they could and struggle to reach the next level. Julie & Julia was a grate movie because it showed progression and the struggle of learning and experiencing failure and success.

post #10 of 10

Gentlemen, you can't see the trees because the forest is in the way.

 

It's not just Foodtv that sucks, it's televison as a whole.

 

I do have a TV, the finest 18" model Mallwart had to offer 15 years ago, kids need something to play compuker games on.

 

Every morning I come to work and have the kitchen to myself for an hour, what do I do?  I am fortuante that in Canada we have a pretty darn good radio station, and I get my newsfix, world events and sports while I get my prep done and my day started.  Might augument it a bit if I sit down for a break and peruse the paper.

 

I get enough "entertainment" at work and and at home with the kids, and I have consuming hobbies (woodworking, cycling and fixing up bikes) to soak up what's left of any time leftover.

 

It's been almost 15 years now since I actually sat down and watched something on that box, and I've never been happier.

 

So really stick it to those TV programming guys, and switch the box off.  It's the only thing that will pi** 'em off and take notice of what they're putting out........

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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