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Macaroni And Cheese Recipe - Tom Jeffers - Page 2

post #31 of 40

Couple of things come to mind.  Mac and cheese, well mac and anything is my top comfort food.  I'm always looking for the perfect recipe for it.  None ever tastes like it did as a kid.  I think that is a result of a bunch of factors--different cheese, different milk, different method of baking it, not to mention macaroni.  The love affair started over 70 years ago.  But, I'm interested in when do chefs decide when to use ground mustard or prepared mustard.  I  in a recipnoted one individual added ground mustard to his sauce.  What qualities does each impart that you chose one or the other.  Do you have a 'rule' that follow?

                 

post #32 of 40

Rueclerk   I could be wrong but I believe the addition of mustard applies to the old timers on this site who used to make a dish called Welsh Rarebit. This was served at luncheons many years ago , still served at some upscale clubs as a special . It is a heavy cheddar cheese sauce flavored with ale or beer and a hint of mustard normally served over toast points. I used to like to prepare it as well as eat it. In my case it was prepared mustard and a drop of hot sauce.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Buchanan View Post

Rueclerk   I could be wrong but I believe the addition of mustard applies to the old timers on this site who used to make a dish called Welsh Rarebit. This was served at luncheons many years ago , still served at some upscale clubs as a special . It is a heavy cheddar cheese sauce flavored with ale or beer and a hint of mustard normally served over toast points. I used to like to prepare it as well as eat it. In my case it was prepared mustard and a drop of hot sauce.



 What's wrong with being "an old timer?" It's a privilege many of my mentors didn't get.

They let the pressure of the job and alcohol do them in. And that is the way we made Welsh Rarebit served it  on "toast points." We made macaroni and cheese with cubed "not shredded"  sharp cheddar with cream sauce"bechamel" in a casserole with more cubed cheddar and a little bread crumbs on top. not this orange  stuff they serve today.You could still see and taste the cream sauce. (How about "The City Club Special" sliced tomatoes and bacon on toast points with sliced sharp cheddar melted on top) I don't think these young kids know cheddar comes in big wheels covered with black wax.

post #34 of 40

I always use Colman's English mustard powder in Welsh rarebit or in Buck rarebit (the welsh one topped with a poached egg!) - probably because that's how my Mum and my Granny both made it and I use their recipe. 

 

I haven't made macaroni and cheese for a long time, but always used a teaspoon of mustard powder in the cheese sauce.

post #35 of 40

Sorry to tell you guys, but I've lived and worked in Wales for the last 10 years, and Welsh rabbit /rarebit originaly was a lump of cheese melted on toast. It's one of those dishes that has evolved and still is. You can go and get a 3 star Michelin version of it at The Waterside in Bray.

Follow this link for where the name comes from. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit#Origin_of_the_names

 

Basically 17th century UK and we're not to well off. Only the rich can afford butchers meat. Rabbit is the poor Englishmans meat. And cheese is the poor Welshmans meat. Hence Welsh Rabbit.

Sorry for banging on with this one.

Try the recipe below

 

Llanboidy rarebit mix

 

1/2 lb Llanboidy

1/4 lb Cheddar

2 whole eggs

1 pint ale ( Guinness would work)

2 tsp English mustard powder

Seasoning

 

You combine all of the ingredients in a mixer, roll it out thin, between two sheets of parchment paper, freeze it down and then cut it in to the shape and size you want it. Toast  your bread on one side, place some really thin slices of apple on the un-toasted side and then place the rarebit on top. 3 mins on the bottom shelf of your grill, or till golden.

I use it as a savoury dessert, served with some garden leaves and a fruit chutney.

Jim

post #36 of 40

Sounds a great recipe for a restaurant - but I like mine freshly made with isle of Mull cheddar and served immediately!

post #37 of 40

CATERCHEF>>This reminds me of a take off Kentucky Brown. Just add Turkey . If you are as old as me you remember this to . Named after the Brown Hotel in Kentucky..Or how about Turkey Divan?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #38 of 40

Ed, CaterChef's recipe is similar to some modern variations called Hot Browns or KY Hot Browns (less the turkey, of course). But it doesn't come close to the actual dish.

 

Hot browns are made with Mornay sauce, not cheddar. And never contained ham, as some current versions do. When it originated at Brown's Hotel, in Louisville, in the '20s, poached chicken was the protein of choice. Later on turkey was substituted, and the two are considered acceptible alternatives.

 

I've never been able to uncover when and where tomato started to be used as a garnish. It's so common, however, that it's done that way at Brown's today. The original used mushrooms, though. Given the timeframe, these were probably carved mushrooms, but the record isn't clear.

 

A signature of Hot Browns is how the bread is laid out. It consists of two slices, one of which is cut on the diagonal. These triangles are fitted against the center square. Poached turkey or chicken is laid out over this elongated triangle, Mornay poured over that. The whole thing is topped with additional Parmesan, a pair of crossed bacon strips, and the mushrooms (tomatoes, nowadays), and popped under the broiler until hot and bubbly.

 

As a matter of historical interest, Brown's is known for something else even more important. During WW II, colored military personel, in uniform, were welcomed at the bar and in the dining room at Brown's---something unheard of anywhere else in the South at the time.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #39 of 40

The term mornay is subject to interpretation of course, as it's only a term; but to my mind any bechamel with cheese -- including cheddar -- is a mornay.

 

BDL

post #40 of 40

Well, the way I learned it, a mornay sauce is made either with Parmesan, or a mixture of Parmesan and Gruyere. While you may be technically correct re: any cheese, I think most cooks would interpret Sauce Morney as being based on Parmesan. 

 

Be that as it may, the original Hot Browns were made with Parmesan melted into the  bechamel (which, btw, included shallots). Cheddar is by far a Johnny come lately in that dish.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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