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What makes owners assume that relaxing dress codes will increase business?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

What makes owners assume that relaxing dress codes will increase business?

Diners that pay $50+ for dinner expect to see the other diners properly dressed.

I know some places are slow but this seems ridiculous to think that lowering dress codes will improve business. When I take my wife or business clients to dinner I don't want to see hairy chests, legs or women in shorts.

 

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/06/29/AR2010062900980.html

post #2 of 20

Sorry to say that "Times....they are a changing."

I have found that same thing but owners need that income these days and will do whatever is necessary to achieve that end.

At my boss' place, he will not allow the gentlemen to wear baseball hats while in the dining room, but will allow short shorts on the ladies, but no bikini's or slings.

 

On the other side of the coin, if I'm paying $50.00++ (not a lot of money these days) I will wear whatever I darn please. If the place has a dress code and it is in plain sight for everyone to see and read, then that's a different story. No sign, I'll wear what I want.

 

(and I'll finish this by saying that I dress conservatively and would never think of wearing anything gaudy or revealing....buts that just me)

post #3 of 20

Caterchef, while I agree with your sentiments entirely, the answer to your question is: Because it works. We live in a much more casual age, and people do not want to get all dressed up to go out. So restaurant dress codes have pretty much become a thing of the past.

 

Personally I wouldn't mind so much if people at least dressed "casual nice." And many, perhaps most, do. But when you see the way some people dress in a fine-dining restaurant you have to wonder, as Mom used to say, "have they no shame!"

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 20

I avoid any place that has a fancy dress code. Can't stand the clothes so I can't stand the meal or experience. If you want my business, you need a relaxed dress standard.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 20

As much as I dislike change, dress code went out with Wanescoating

post #6 of 20

To be honest I don't know what to think anymore.  My brother went to a place (somewhere in the Bay Area, Cali) that his ex-girlfriend's parents had to buy him a suit to eat at. At least, as far as they were concerned. He did need a jacket and tie to get in the door and have a seat. I have eaten in places that  I was surprised that  when i walked in didn't ask for a better standard of clothing. Lord knows, cargo shorts and Hawaiian shirts don't fit EVERYWHERE , even in California.  But then again, who wants to lose business just cause the guy is wearing shorts and a loud shirt  but can pay for his 60 dollar lunch, while he is on vacation with his wife in Napa Valley?

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #7 of 20

What can I say?  It's not 1955 anymore.

 

BDL

post #8 of 20

Part of the whole dinner experience was getting dressed in your nice suits, your leather soled shoes, your silk tie, and having the taxi drop you off at the Ritz.  I love wearing suits.  I have seven, don't ask me why, I have no reason.  There's something special about a finely tailored suit.

post #9 of 20

I like to dress up sometimes too.. it just makes the evening more memorable feeling.  I think alot of that comes from the fact that during my working life I have always dressed like a grub.  I worked with special needs kids and adults before I left the workforce to raise my own kids and well.. one did not wear power suits for those jobs.. I have been drooled (and worse) on and well having cheap I don't care kind of clothes were perfect work clothes.  As a stay home mom I think I was a hausfrau and looked the part for the most part.  Now I work in basically jammies with a chef coat and hat... so yeah I like to dress nicely when I am not working.  I married a farm boy though.. he is mr jeans and tshirt all the way and in his job he can get away with it and they tell him when clients will be in so he can dress for the occassion.

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #10 of 20

Well I'm a tomboy a heart maybe that's why I feel so comfy in the kitchen industry hangin with the boys.

 

I would prefer to stay in jeans and a T.... but so many have not recognized me when I have attended functions with people I work with. My hair is up in a hat all day no make-up,whites or blacks ...I like blacks..and my berks....well there's a fashion show!....LOL

 That's why I love to dress it makes you fell like a woman again! I have actually had owners of operations I have worked for invite me to their home and not recognize me when they answer the door! One said "Are you one of my daughter's friends?"

I'm old enough to be their mother!

 

In answer to the question Bob Dylon said it best "Man these times are a changin"..... who cares what other people are wearing. I don't look at other people when I go out to eat. I think that's from my mom ..... as it is rude to stare

My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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post #11 of 20

Yeah, times are a changing.

 

I don't mind much people in shorts or casual attire in a high end/white tablecloth dining room.

 

But then how do you define attire that doesn't offend, and says "I respect others as much as I respect myself"?

 

"Party till ya puke" t-shirt, or a halter-top revealing more than I want to see? Pants hanging down past the crotch line and colourfull underwear with boldy lettered waistbands prominently displayed?  Hey why not?  Clothes are clean and in good repair, right?

 

One thing I don't tolerate well is other people's tattoos in a restaurant, and I get very uncomfortable about that. If they (tats) are covered with clothing, then  I don't see and don't care, and have a good time 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 

 I can not believe  I am reading  this from Professional Chefs.

Maybe they will change the name of this forum to Casual Chefs Forum.

It is the "baby boomers" that is the majority of "Fine Dinning" customers.

Most of the "yuppies" don't visit  "Fine Dinning  or Country Clubs" often.

That's why the "casual and franchises" have become so popular.

If the "Fine Dinning" restaurants and clubs have to relax dress codes

to be competitive then they will have to reduce prices and guess what will happen

to Exec. Chef's $80K+ position.

It will be replaced with kitchen manager for $30K or less

serving frozen food made in Witchita or Omaha.( no offence Kansas and Nebraska)

It may even be made in  Mexico or China.

We have down graded our schools for the minority

please don't tell me I will have to eat with them too.

( I think I'll go be a hermit in the mountains)

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by caterchef View Post

 I can not believe  I am reading  this from Professional Chefs.

Maybe they will change the name of this forum to Casual Chefs Forum.

It is the "baby boomers" that is the majority of "Fine Dinning" customers.

Most of the "yuppies" don't visit  "Fine Dinning  or Country Clubs" often.

That's why the "casual and franchises" have become so popular.

If the "Fine Dinning" restaurants and clubs have to relax dress codes

to be competitive then they will have to reduce prices and guess what will happen

to Exec. Chef's $80K+ position.

It will be replaced with kitchen manager for $30K or less

serving frozen food made in Witchita or Omaha.( no offence Kansas and Nebraska)

It may even be made in  Mexico or China.

We have down graded our schools for the minority

please don't tell me I will have to eat with them too.

( I think I'll go be a hermit in the mountains)


Yes, I agree

but if the Rolling Stones were to walk into your establishment?
 

My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 

 We would hand them a coat and tie, the same as we did other stars and politicians.

We kept spare coats and ties in the cloak room with the hat check girl.

Even my father in law was impressed when she asked him to put on a coat when he came to the Club. And  If Britney Spears had come to the Club she would have had to wear panties, there is nothing wrong with being properly dressed when you go out to dinner.

It's called being respectful to others. If we can dress the table at least they can dress their bodies appropiately.( And True Chefs don't wear ball caps, bandanas and berets either.)

Even in baseball if you wear the hat backwards, you have to be the catcher.

post #15 of 20

You state a false dilemma when you tie state of dress to how much the clientèle will pay for a quality meal.

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #16 of 20

Kitchens are at the point where no one can crank out a pan of chicken ala king without a recipe, anti-discrimination laws are enforced, and a good toque is hard to find.  The leisure suit is dead.

 

Western civilization has declined and fallen like a souffle in a construction zone. Hold me, darling.  I'm frightened. 

 

But wait.  Is that a hint of Eau d'Vieux Pet wafting through the kitchen door? 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/9/10 at 10:34am
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

You state a false dilemma when you tie state of dress to how much the clientèle will pay for a quality meal.

 


Sometimes it's not about that though.  Sometimes it's about feeling special.  Take Victoria and Albert's for instance.  When my wife and I were there a few years back there was a group of three girls and their parents all dressed up.  You could tell the kids were totally immersed in the whole experience.  To them it was like a fairy tale.

post #18 of 20

You're absolutely right, Kuan. It's about feeling good, and enjoying the whole special experience. What restaurteurs have discovered, however, is that "feeling good" varies, person to person. One man's dress up is another man's horror show.

 

It's my choice to dress up when I go out, and a jacket & tie and nice dress are never out of place. If I choose to wear a dressy pull-over shirt and casual slacks, instead, the restaurant will still be happy to serve me. Same goes for jeans and a T-shirt.

 

Putting personal dress aside, and getting this back to the OPs query, the fact is it is not an assumption. There are studies showing that relaxing dress codes increases business. Even the Rainbow Room has gone that route.

 

I would also guess, from observation, that it's a tempest in a teapot anyway. People who mostly eat at Applebees and such are not the kind to spend big money in a fine-dining restaurant. Those prepared to drop those kind of bucks, on the other hand, by and large know how to dress for the occasion, and do so.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post


Sometimes it's not about that though.  Sometimes it's about feeling special.


No argument, provided dressing up makes you feel special.

 

It just makes me feel like I'm wearing a monkey suit. And the tie! O how I hate the TIE! Even though I can tie a proper double windsor.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #20 of 20

If your from Tampa your lucky they're not wearing speedos to the table.  In Tucson they tried formal dining and it was about as popular as the proverbial hair shirt.

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