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Hollandaise Sauce Question - Page 4

post #91 of 108

It is less expensive to make real Hollandaise then buy this junk.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #92 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

 

To start with, nomenclature.  Beurre blanc with cream is not beurre blanc, it's beurre Nantais. 

In classical French culinary terms that is correct, but it is like the whole morphed demi thing. I didn't want to bore people with the details. My bad.

 

Edit: tsk tsk Layne.  (kuan)

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #93 of 108

I agree

post #94 of 108
I agree

To what?

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #95 of 108

Im a purist and I say if its good don't change it , I also say if your Hollandaise recipe has less or more ingredients than the recipe below

Its simply not Hollandaise :)

 

 

HOLLANDAISE RECIPE FROM 1903 Escoffier Le Guide Culinaire

 

Hollandaise is made by simultaneously whisking and heating egg yolks, lemon juice, and a little water and then slowly blending in butter until a creamy and rich sauce is produced.  It is seasoned with salt and sometimes black or red pepper.  It is decadently delicious and pairs well with eggs, steak, fish and vegetables.

The first recorded hollandaise sauce was published in France in the 1600’s but undoubtedly it existed for some time before that.  There are a variety of explanations for how the sauce was named; the common denominator being the rich butter and dairy products that Holland was famous for. 

            Hollandaise is the minefield of the culinary world.  Step a little out of line and it blows up in your face.  It’s tricky because it’s an emulsified sauce and if you’re not careful, specifically about minding the heat level, the sauce can break. 

 

6 egg yolks

1 tablespoon water

1-2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 lb. unsalted butter, melted*

Salt and pepper to taste

Cayenne pepper, to taste (optional)

 

            Place a stainless steel bowl over a pot with a few inches of water in it.  Ensure that the bowl is not actually touching the water in the pot.  Heat the water to a very gentle simmer whereby it is just barely steaming.  Add the egg yolks, water and lemon juice to the bowl and begin constantly whisking until the eggs are frothy and you start to see ribbons in them left by the whisk.  If at any point they appear to be cooking too quickly or solidifying do not hesitate to remove the bowl from the pot to cool down. When the eggs are frothy turn off the heat.  Leave the bowl over the pot and use the residual heat from this point on.  Begin adding the melted butter very slowly, incessantly whisking.  If at any point it looks like the sauce is breaking, (as evidenced by oily melted butter forming around the edge or on top of the sauce), immediately remove the pan from the heat, add a small splash of cold water and whisk like mad. When the butter is fully incorporated, add salt and pepper.  Also assess for additional lemon juice. 

            Hollandaise can be tricky to store without breaking.  It must be kept warm but not too hot.  But that’s more of a restaurant problem.  At home, just serve it immediately and avoid any additional complications. 

            Many chefs prefer clarified butter.  To do so, substitute 12 oz. clarified butter in the above recipe but increase the water from 1 to 4 tablespoons.

 

Shallot, vinegar, and particularly the herb tarragon are incorporated into a hollandaise to make béarnaise sauce. 


Edited by ChefZoneAU - 6/25/12 at 4:53am
post #96 of 108

I realize that this discussion may be dead, but it pops up on the ChefTalk website as one of the top "most active" current threads -- which tells you something about that little engine. In any event:

 

Quote:

Sauce Hollandaise. – Réduire de deux tiers 4 cuillerées d’eau et 2 cuillerées de vinaigre, additionnées d’une pincée de mignonette et d’une pincée de sel fin. Retirer sur le côté du feu ou placer la casserole au bain-marie.

            Ajouter une cuillerée d’eau et 5 jaunes d’œufs ; monter la sauce avec 500 grammes de beurre cru ou fondu en l’additionnant, pendant le montage, de 3 ou 4 cuillerées d’eau, mises par petites parties : addition qui a pour but de donner de la légèreté à la sauce.

            Compléter l’assaisonnement avec le sel nécessaire, quelques gouttes de jus de citron, et passer à l’étamine.

            Tenir au bain-marie, tiède seulement, pour prévenir la décomposition.

            – Spéciale aux poissons et légumes.

            Nota. – Les vinaigres employés pour réduction n’étant pas toujours de qualité irréprochable, il est préférable de couper de deux tiers d’eau, mais non de supprimer complètement la réduction.

            L’excédent d’acidité, s’il est nécessaire, est fourni par le citron.

 

Auguste Escoffier, with Philéas Gilbert and Emile Fetu, Le guide culinaire : aide-mémoire de cuisine pratique, 4th ed. (Paris: Flammarion, 1921), 33-34.

This is the first edition of the Guide that I could get access to quickly.

 

For those interested, he says much the same about Béarnaise, from which recipe (p. 29) I excerpt:

 

Quote:

… monter la sauce à feu doux, avec 500 grammes de beurre cru (ou fondu à l’avance) en fouettant légèrement.

            La liaison de la sauce se produit par la cuisson progressive des jaunes d’œufs ;d’où nécessité absolue de traiter la sauce Béarnaise à feu doux. …

            Nota. – Il est inutile de songer à servir très chaude cette sauce qui est, en somme, une Mayonnaise au beurre. Il suffit qu’elle soit tiède et, d’ailleurs, si elle est trop chauffée, elle se décompose.

post #97 of 108

Thanks Chris, for posting that information in French.      It's so very useful that way.      (Big "LOL" here. I'm joking.)

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #98 of 108

Sure, thanks for the snarky comments, now help us out and translate it already!

post #99 of 108

Hey -- I honestly had no intention to be snarky. There was a whole back-and-forth about what Escoffier actually said, and some people referred to the French text, but nobody gave the original. So I posted it.

 

To translate, I have to insert some interpretation of what I think Escoffier was trying to get at. Others might disagree. Nevertheless, leaping in where angels fear to tread, the crucial bits:

 

Quote:
"monter la sauce avec 500 grammes de beurre cru ou fondu"
mount the sauce with 500g of raw or melted butter
 
"monter la sauce à feu doux, avec 500 grammes de beurre cru (ou fondu à l’avance) en fouettant légèrement"
mount the sauce on low fire with 500g of raw butter (or melted in advance) while whisking lightly"
 
"Il est inutile de songer à servir très chaude cette sauce qui est, en somme, une Mayonnaise au beurre."
It is pointless to dream of serving very hot this sauce which is, at base, a mayonnaise [made] with butter." [This is deliberately literal to the point of being awkward in English.]

As I read Escoffier's directions, the point is to mount the sauce with 500g of butter. The issue at hand, of whether one should use whole or clarified butter, doesn't seem to be on his radar. My take on Escoffier here is that he's not especially doctrinaire: it would depend on what you have in mind for the sauce, what sort of effect you want, etc. But that's my view of what Escoffier generally does.

 

Seriously, I didn't mean to cause trouble. I genuinely thought I was being helpful!

post #100 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Used the Knorr holly waaay back in the early 80's.  Swiiss Army provisions got it for free (on or past the expiry date)m from the factory and fobbed it off on the cooks' corp.   Came in 250 ml tetra boxes.  Bomb proof, that stuff.  You could cook it--no boil it-- over a paaffin burner, or use it as a base for salad dressing.  One box + 1 liter of oil and 1/4 liter vinegar.

 

And after that, I never, EVER used it again..........

You should revisit after all me and Marco Pierre White swear by certain Knorr products.http://www.marcopierrewhite.org/

post #101 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer View Post

Hey -- I honestly had no intention to be snarky. There was a whole back-and-forth about what Escoffier actually said, and some people referred to the French text, but nobody gave the original. So I posted it.

 

To translate, I have to insert some interpretation of what I think Escoffier was trying to get at. Others might disagree. Nevertheless, leaping in where angels fear to tread, the crucial bits:

 

As I read Escoffier's directions, the point is to mount the sauce with 500g of butter. The issue at hand, of whether one should use whole or clarified butter, doesn't seem to be on his radar. My take on Escoffier here is that he's not especially doctrinaire: it would depend on what you have in mind for the sauce, what sort of effect you want, etc. But that's my view of what Escoffier generally does.

 

Seriously, I didn't mean to cause trouble. I genuinely thought I was being helpful!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer View Post

Hey -- I honestly had no intention to be snarky. There was a whole back-and-forth about what Escoffier actually said, and some people referred to the French text, but nobody gave the original. So I posted it.

 

To translate, I have to insert some interpretation of what I think Escoffier was trying to get at. Others might disagree. Nevertheless, leaping in where angels fear to tread, the crucial bits:

 

As I read Escoffier's directions, the point is to mount the sauce with 500g of butter. The issue at hand, of whether one should use whole or clarified butter, doesn't seem to be on his radar. My take on Escoffier here is that he's not especially doctrinaire: it would depend on what you have in mind for the sauce, what sort of effect you want, etc. But that's my view of what Escoffier generally does.

 

Seriously, I didn't mean to cause trouble. I genuinely thought I was being helpful!

I took it that way, I have never heard of mounting butter, The French term is Monte au Buerre or to emulsify  butter into a warm sauce.

I dont bother with a ballon whisk any more . I only make hollandaise in the summer using unsalted summer alpine butter heated in a pan and dribbled into a slow running liquidiser that contains very fresh egg yolks ect.I do try hard to leave most of the sediment in the pan.

post #102 of 108

Mounting is used in USA as French is not spoken in most kitchens.  Never new Hollandaise was seasonal?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #103 of 108

Had a great comeback for you, ed.

Proofed and deleted as I am working hard not to be such a smart***

;-)

mimi

post #104 of 108

I don't understand the remark about a Hollandaise to be seasonal confused.gif

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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post #105 of 108

For me it a summer season sauce for two reasons. The first is that I associate the sauce with poached fresh wild Scottish Salmon, Welsh Sewyn and Cheshire Asparagus.The second is that the summer butter I use has a deep yellow colour this also applies to the egg yolks.Winter butter over here can be so pale its almost white and because the cows are fed on hay etc indoors IMO its not as tasty.  

post #106 of 108

As you said" For Me "" this is your opinion only  Don't tell your customers this.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #107 of 108

my personal method is to 'half' clarify the butter. melt the butter in a pan, bring to the boil and simmer for a minute or two (not very long). and leave to cool for a bit-this is essential, remove the scum and use the remains in the sauce. i also like quite a thick sabayon. i find this makes a nice thick sauce. This is my individual way, you could write books on hollandaise sauce and chefs opinions and methods.

post #108 of 108

to clarify or not to clarify ? lol

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