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cooking with alcohol

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I have heard that when cooking with alcohol.....if you cook or bake it for at least twenty minutes the actual alcohol content is cooked out leaving behind only the flavor. Is this true?

~~Tamara~~
"That which does not kill you makes you stronger."
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"That which does not kill you makes you stronger."
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post #2 of 28
I am expecting some answers from the Food pros.

From my experience, alcohol "disappears" indeed and it leaves a flavor.

My question is, does the alcohol leaves a flavor or it helps the main ingredient to enrich its original flavour?

Is my question clear or I have had too much wine ? :)
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #3 of 28
As an aside, not all alcohol evaporates when added to a liquid such as stock. The mixture is called an azeotrope as described in the current issue of FINE COOKING magazine.

But yes, an alcoholic beverage added to food will, indeed, flavor it. Hence the action of flambe. Try adding 1 - 2 tsps whiskey to 3 qts of chicken stock, you'll taste the difference. Adding more than 2 tsps ruins it.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #4 of 28
Whiskey to chicken stock? I have never heard of that before.

As for cooking with alcohol when you deglaze a saute pan you do burn off the alcohol.
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Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #5 of 28
Nicko, that's deglazing vs flavoring a liquid.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #6 of 28
Your right Kokpuffs, I also found this chart on the net:
PREPARATION METHOD---------------------------------------Alcohol Retained

No heat application, immediate consumption -------------100%

No heat application, overnight storage-----------------------70%

Alcohol ingredient added to boiling liquid,------------------85%
and removed from heat

Flamed ---------------------------------------------------------------75%

Baked, approximately 25 minutes, alcohol ingredient--45%
on surface of mixture (not stirred in)

Baked/simmered, alcohol ingredient stirred into mixture
15 minutes-----------------------------------------------------------------40%
30 minutes-----------------------------------------------------------------35%
1 hour------------------------------------------------------------------------25%
1.5 hours--------------------------------------------------------------------20%
2 hours-----------------------------------------------------------------------10%
2.5 hours---------------------------------------------------------------------5%


source: Minnesota Nutrition Council Newsletter
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Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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post #7 of 28
Yes, whiskey added to stock...mind expanding, aren't I!!!!!!!!!:bounce: :bounce: :eek: :bounce: :bounce:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #8 of 28
That is really interesting, did you come up with that yourself Kokopuffs, and if so what prompted you to try adding whiskey?

Can you describe the flavor a bit? It really isn't going to impart any acidity to the stock, is intended more to round out the flavor. For some reason I just can't imagine it rounding out the flavor.

It is interesting, I will give it a try next time. Are you adding it right at the end?
Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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post #9 of 28
Nicko:

Either the usage of whiskey was pure inspiration or from Raymond Oliver's book entitled LA CUISINE. Whiskey tends to round out the flavor IMHO when used sparingly. Longer simmering mellows any "harshness". As to acidity, dunno'.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #10 of 28
Thanks, I will try it.
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Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #11 of 28
Kokopuffs, when you add alcohol (ie. wine, bourbon, etc) and deglaze a pan you still add flavor to the liquid that you then add next. So deglazing is a way of adding flavor to a liquid, it also helps to pull up all those caramelized bits stuck to the bottom of the pan, helping them to also flavor the liquid and to keep them from burning.

As for flambeeing, as Nicko pointed out, only part of the alcohol gets burned off. Liquids will only flambe when their alcohol content reaches a certain point. As the alcohol burns it becomes more diluted until it gets to a point where the alcohol content can't support a flame

As an example, the bourbon sauce that I make: I caramelize veg in a pan. I then deglaze with bourbon and flame it to burn off the alcohol, leaving just the rich caramel and oak tones to the bourbon. I then add my demi and seasonings. Reduce that, add cream, reduce again. Then, just before straining I add a bit of raw bourbon to give the sauce just a hint of that raw alcohol bite.
post #12 of 28
Thanks for the clarification. Yes, alcohol does flavor in general.

I plan to braise rabbit in Guinness beer. But please don't tell Homer Simpsom about it.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #13 of 28

Guiness and rabbit

Now that sounds good to me. 2 of my favorite things rabbit and Guiness beer.

During the summer I take pork tenderloins and marinate overnight in a Bourbon, honey, Maple syrup marinade and roll them in choped Pecans then roast in the oven. I then deglaze the pan with the marinade and make a sauce out of it and drizzle over the sliced pork loin and Garlic/dill mashed potatoes.


Yummmmmmyyyyyy.

Billy
post #14 of 28
Hey BillyG:

Reading your recipe told me that you're southerner. I have relatives who own property in Brunswick and St. Simons Island. Good eating down that way!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #15 of 28
I have read this thread many times.

I always fail to succed in what you call deglazing
The alcohol evaporates too soon and the sauce gets very dark...
Why? Because I do that in high temperature?
I have tried Pete'sbourbon sauce and it was a catastrophy...

When I make meat in casserole, first I saute it for 5 min and then I add a glass of wine and I reduce the heat and let it boil with it's liquid.
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #16 of 28
I love cooking with alcohol, at home that is. My favourites are Single Malt Scotch or a full bodied red. Sometimes I sip on a beer but I never ever do cognac. :D

Kuan
post #17 of 28
May I recommend tasting, in a properly warmed (not heated) brandy snifter, some high quality armangnac or even calvados? Just about 5 - 10 cc's in the glass will do, enough to savour a highly delicate aroma. What a truly exquisite experience.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #18 of 28

DEGLAZING

To deglaze:

1. Reduce the heat (or flame) to the vessel.
2. Squeeze some lemon into the fond (pan drippings). Swirl.
2. Add enough wine to cover the bottom of the pan. Reduce
SLIGHTLY.
3. To the reduction add some stock or creme. Reduce to a
desireable thickness.
4. Feed me.

-T

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #19 of 28
Thanks for the tips kokopuffs.

It always so easy to read the recipes ! You think that you can prepare everything.
In tip number 4 you forgot " Shut up and feed me"


:D
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #20 of 28
Tip Number 5:

Shut up, bring me a beer, and go change the channel on the tv!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #21 of 28
Yeah right.

Kokopuffs does all the work ...
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #22 of 28
Vinegar is great for deglazing. It leaves a sweet taste. No it doesn't taste like vinegar, the acid just evaporates, must be like alcohol.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #23 of 28
mmmmm.....i adore both armagnac and calvados. i completely concur kokopuffs! :)
post #24 of 28
I had amaretto salmon last night, funny, didn't make much of a difference.

Kuan
post #25 of 28
OH! I Just read kokopuff's post about deglazing. So it goes IN THE PAN!?!? :D

Kuan
post #26 of 28
:lol:

This was a good one!
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
Reply
post #27 of 28
Yes, that's correct. In the pan and not on the stove!!! :p :p

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
:smiles: Or in your stomach.....
Pan first....Stomach second...... :)

~~Tamara~~
"That which does not kill you makes you stronger."
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"That which does not kill you makes you stronger."
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