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National Hot Dog Day

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 

Today is National Hot Dog Day. 

 

How are you fixing yours?

 

BDL

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post #2 of 33

I would bbq, but it's raining

 

I love a traditional dog with ketchup, mustard, sauerkraut and relish, plus maybe some vidalia onions if I'm in the mood.

post #3 of 33

Chef BDL,

 

 

I like my buns toasted then the hot dogs topped with onions and mustard. (fried onions or not) , with a cold glass of  Sleeman or Heineken.

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post #4 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheKitchenSink View Post

I would bbq, but it's raining

 

I love a traditional dog with ketchup, mustard, sauerkraut and relish, plus maybe some vidalia onions if I'm in the mood.


No dis-respect, but in Chicago you better not put ketchup on your hot dog. Celery salt, bright green relish, mustard, tomatoes and onion.

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post #5 of 33

Hot dogs grilled only with Mustard ,Relish and fresh from the garden chopped red onion....I don't eat processed food but I do have a hanker for a dog once in awhile......that's the way I used to eat em before I had all kinda restrictions in my diet.

 

Cheers to all the dog lovers out there....I'll just have a cold Coors and dream of hot dog days gone past!

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post #6 of 33
Thread Starter 


 

No dis-respect, but in Chicago you better not put ketchup on your hot dog. Celery salt, bright green relish, mustard, tomatoes and onion.


Oooh.  Oooh.  And sport peppers and dill pickle spears.  Leave us not forget the sport peppers and dill pepper spears.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/23/10 at 5:47pm
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post #7 of 33

Very funny BDL. No peppers. Definitely the dill spears.

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post #8 of 33

"And sport peppers and dill pepper spears."

 

Ummm. no, BDL  The hot sport peppers are good, but it's dill pickle spears.  I believe the bright green relish and the celery salt have already been covered.   Some diced tomato is OK, too.

 

And, if you even mention ketchup, you will be thrown out any respectable hot dog joint in Chicago.   We are pretty intolerant about our dogs here in Chicago.

 

Mike

 

Actually, if nobody is watching me, I might go for a little kraut, too.

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post #9 of 33

The late Mike Ryoko, ascerbic curmudgeon who wrote a column for one of the two major papers, I forgot which, once mentioned putting catsup on a Chicago dog.  It took a while for THAT to die down!

 

I love a good Chicago dog, among many other styles.  Why does the relish have to be that bright, unnatural neon green?

 

mjb.

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post #10 of 33
Thread Starter 

I meant pickle and stand by the sport peppers.

 

9304DD9C03B6493FB0D6AF121E549C49.jpg

 

Mmmmm.  Sport peppers.

 

BDL

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post #11 of 33

No question at all about the hot sport peppers, BDL; one of the essential ingredients.

 

As I understand it, the flourescent-green pickle relish is "fermented"...  I'm not really sure what that means. It's not easy to find, even in local stores.

 

Of course, the local requirement is for Vienna brand all-beef dog and absolutely a natural casing for that "pop" when you bite it.  The buns need to be poppy-seed, and steamed.

 

The dogs are boiled... but again, when nobody's watching me, I grill them.

 

Bratwurst, I simmer in beer with onions and a couple of mashed garlic cloves, then finish on the grill.

 

But, that's a whole different culture.

 

Mike

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post #12 of 33

"The late Mike Ryoko, ascerbic curmudgeon who wrote a column for one of the two major papers, I forgot which..."

 

Royko, who was indeed a curmudgeon's curmudgeon, actually worked for both Chicago papers. He started on the Sun-Times (or at least was there when I got here,) and was later wooed away by the Tribune, where he worked until his death. 

 

His place has been taken by columnist John Kass, whose curmudgeonly columns on politics, corruption,  and organized crime are the only things worth reading in today's Trib. We've got a lot of all three here in Illinois, so he's got plenty of work. He's also an avid barbecue/griller, and devotes some space on his website to this. Being of Greek extraction, he has some innate flair for this.

 

Mike

 

Just as a side note- I spent two plus years as a member of a Federal Special Grand Jury which was principally charged with going after local organized crime.  If ahybody tries to tell you that Organized Crime is a figment of some prosecutor's imagination...

 

DON'T YOU BELIEVE IT! 

 

just ask your local bookie what he pays for the vig, or street tax. Or loses his kneecaps.

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post #13 of 33

I didn't know it was national hot dog day!  Too bad here in Greece we don't have any hot dogs.  But if we did I'm dreaming of mine topped with yellow mustard, raw diced onion, spicy chili, and cool slaw.

 

That's how we do them in the southeast.  You can't pay me money to top my dog with relish or saurkraut.

 

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post #14 of 33

Question: Who does put ketchup on hot dogs? And how did the practice start?

 

Reason I ask is that it's not done in the hot-dog capitals of the country. Neither New Yorkers nor Chicagoans would even consider it, for instance.

 

I lived in the Chicago area for the ten longest years of my life, and, frankly, you can keep all that garden truck that they pile on. I always thought they did that cuz they really didn't like the taste of the dogs.

 

Mostly I don't eat hot dogs. I'd like to claim this is cuz there are so many better tasting sausages, and that's partially correct. But, the truth is, I used to hustle hotdogs in the stands at Yankee Stadium and the Polo Grounds, and still can't get the smell out of my nose 45 years later.

 

When I do eat them I prefer mine two ways, one, unfortunately, no longer available.

 

1. Slathered with yellow mustard and top with oil-poached onions & peppers, the way they used to do it on the Sabrette carts.

 

2. Liberally smeared with Needick's hot dog relish. Sadly, that's gone the way of the dodo bird, and all my attempts to replicate it have failed.

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post #15 of 33
Thread Starter 

KY,  I dunno my brother.

 

Same people put ketchup on dogs as put beans in chili, basically.  The nice thing about dogs is that condiments are more individual than communal.

 

Except for cocktail weenies in sweet and sour ketchup.  Yum-O.

 

Hot dogs are iconically American.  I think it might be a little provincial to claim New York or Chicago have sole rights to the quintessential hot dog.  Although, they certainly have a claim to rights for quintessential New York and Chicago style dogs.  But even then, there are hot dog stands in the hinterlands which do a pretty good job.  We got Petrillos out here too, y'know.

 

I've spent serious sausage time in both towns and don't find their dogs play a better tune than, say, a Pink's chili dogs (L.A.).  Worth mentioning that some of the dogs coming from SoCal's Armenian and Russian makers are just awesome.  

 

What about a deep south style chili dog?  With cole-slaw.

 

And what about...

 

BDL

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post #16 of 33

I don't claim those towns have the quintessential right. But they are associated, culinarily, with hot dogs.

 

I would suggest that if you lined up a hundred people, chosen at random from all over the country, and asked them where hot dogs are king, 98 of them would name either NY or Chicago. If you then mentioned Pinks specifically, they'd say, oh, yeah, LA. But they don't mean LA; they mean that one, specific restaurant.

 

Be honest. If Pink's closed tomorrow, would you go out of your way for a hot dog in LA?

 

Nor do I see topping a dog with chile anywhere in the same class as smearing it with ketchup.

 

Ketchup is a specific condiment that, overall, is not usually paired with hot dogs. I've been around hot-dog eaters all over the country, and can literally count the folks who used ketchup on them on my two hands---and maybe have a couple of fingers left over. So I was merely wondering why some people have gone that route, and what possible reason there is for the practice.

 

 

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post #17 of 33

" lived in the Chicago area for the ten longest years of my life,"

 

Was that because of the people, the food, or the weather?

 

Just asking. Having lived here for over 30 years now, after moving back from six years in  Santa Barbara and four in Seattle, I have a certain amount of sympathy with your comment.

 

BDL- Petrillo was the President of the Chicago Musicians Union for about one hundred years, but I assume you meant  Portillos, which is a pretty decent fast-food operation, specializing to some excent in the Chicago Hot Dog.. But what the he1l, all those Italians look the same to me, too. 

 

Mike

 

 

 

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post #18 of 33
Thread Starter 

Portillo's yes.  My bad.  Petrillo's is possibly the only decent pizza in the SGV.  Am actually chowing down on an anchovy, jalapeno, olive and sausage pie right now, but sadly from Hungry Howie's.  

 

There are more than a few excellent hot dog places in LA area, especially in the SFV.  Also a bunch of great carts downtown around the courthouse, where I used to hang.  And leave us not forget Jody Maroni's which had more than a little something to do with the national haute dog trend.

 

Pink's is wonderful -- or at least it used to be before they redesigned the line and you could still get to it.  But the significance is not so much Pink's per se, but their creation of the chili dog itself.

 

You know as well as I, that a life lived without chili dogs would be drab and meaningless.  Yet there are those from Chi who eschew sport peppers.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/24/10 at 3:13pm
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post #19 of 33

BDL-

Could you give me the address of the correct Pink's restaurant in LA?

 

My son is there this week and I'd like to suggest he give it a try if it's anywhere close to his hotel... he has a car. He has had some familiarity with the Chicago Hot Dog, and would be open to a new experience. He's planning to go to "Street" while he's there.. any thoughts?

 

Thanks

 

Mike

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post #20 of 33

When I was a kid (in NJ)  I liked ketchup on my dog. For most of my youth until my early 20s I didn't like mustard at all. It just tasted harsh to me. My kids are similar, not much of mustard eaters. Some do ketchup on the dog, some not. I suspect that is where ketchup on dogs comes from is kids who find mustard harsh.

 

I still don't want mustard on a hamburger for example. Just overpowers and kils the burger.

 

post #21 of 33

" actually chowing down on an anchovy, jalapeno, olive and sausage pie right now, "

 

Well,, dammit, you;ve just spoiled my whole day.  I don't know where to get one of those things around here.  I'm going to have to go to a nearby Cajun restaurant (based out of Texas) and have a dozen oysters, even though they're out of season - and maybe basted in heavy crude.

 

Mike

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post #22 of 33

hd's & B's 004.jpg  Hot Dog souphd's & B's 001.jpg  Nathans 8-1 with my home grown bacon, relish,mustard,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,ChefBillyB

post #23 of 33

Phil-

 

"For most of my youth until my early 20s I didn't like mustard at all. It just tasted harsh to me. My kids are similar, not much of mustard eaters. Some do ketchup on the dog, some not. I suspect that is where ketchup on dogs comes from is kids who find mustard harsh."

 

I, as a mustard lover,find this very strange.  No wonder people are wary of Mitt Romney.

You Mormons are different. 

 

Kidding

 

I've known a few, including Chase Peterson, who are among the best people I've ever met. 

 

Mike

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post #24 of 33
Thread Starter 

Pinks

709 N. La Brea

Los Angeles

(323) 931-4223

 

It's in the West Hollywood neighborhood but not actually in the city of West Hollywood.  It's on the west side of La Brea, second door north of Melrose, between the flower store and the used clothes store.  Pinks has its own parking lot which you can get to from La Brea or from the alley behind Pinks. 

 

If you're driving north, so you'd have to make a left into the lot, better to make a left on Melrose, then the first right into the alley and get to the parking lot that way.  Making a left on La Brea can be impossible for someone out of town.

 

Go at a weird hour and prepare to wait in line anyway.  It's not so much that they're slow or even that crowded as incredibly disorganized.  Kind of amazing since they've been in business for 70 something years.  Even more amazing when you consider that they had a working system for 60 something years and "improved" it to the current state of disfunction.

 

Tell your boy to get a regular chili dog and one of something fanciful.  Stick to the dogs, don't get fries, burgers or anything else.  Dogs of any sort -- good.  Anything else -- bad.  No.  Wait. They have some interesting sodas, too.  Soda choice is at the cash register. 

 

If he's planning on trying Tommy's Hamburgers (original at Beverly and Ramparts), he should be forewarned, Tommy's chili isn't everyone's dish of tea.  It can seem somewhat starchy to those not already addicted.  Also, make sure to get a big bunch of the yellow peppers.

 

If he's going to go to one place in LA for something that's best in LA but for which other cities have bigger reps -- go to Langers for the pastrami.

 

And for things we ARE known for -- K-Town for Korean style sushi.  You can't get better raw fish anywhere.  Monterey Park and Alhambra for dumplings and handmade noodles, not to mention the best Taiwanese interpretation of "Peking duck" outside China.  You can't imagine until you've tried it. 

 

We've also got an unreal selection of all kinds of Asian, Mexican and Central American restaurants. Let me know if I can help with specific recommendations.

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post #25 of 33

This thread has really taken a turn for the worse.  I was getting all set to fix some sort of hot dog based dinner tonight.  My wife came home earlier with a box of Zatarains red beans and rice.  I've been getting sick, so she's looking to ease my cooking chores and that boxed stuff is actually pretty tasty for what it is.  Of course I'm still working a bit on it - the box calls for 3+ cups of water to cook the contents, but I can't just use tap water, I'm making a broth from smoked ham hocks and shrimp shells.

 

So for something along the lines of a hot dog I go to Harmon's to get some andouille - not a link left, drat!  So much for that idea.  And then to add insult to injury I check this thread and see the picture of Billy B's bacon dog - sheesh, I want one so bad!

 

And on another note regarding BDL and his cocktail weenies in sweet and sour ketchup - yum.

 

mjb.

 

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post #26 of 33

Was that because of the people, the food, or the weather?

 

Yes.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Was that because of the people, the food, or the weather?

 

Yes.


post #28 of 33

I love hotdogs,

But I'm still not a big fan of mustard. Yeah, the taste is a bit too harsh.

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post #29 of 33

Maybe it's sacrilege in the hot-dog connoisseur world, but my absolute favorite way to make a dog is by poaching it, splitting it down the middle, grilling it, putting it in a toasted french roll with wholegrain mustard, shaved onion, a dill pick spear, and nomnomnom.  Even better if it's a brat with beer.

post #30 of 33

A good chili dog is hard to beat.

 

We used to sell 8 to 10,000 hot dogs annually at our golf course.  We had a lot of oriental customers, and they would eat hot dogs at the crack of dawn.  We also sold bananas and other fruit.  It was not unusual to see a hot dog with sliced bananas on them as breakfast food.

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