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Bought my first Chef coats

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Well I have been working at a restaurant hotel for a bout 1 month now as a prep/pantry cook,and the chef gave me some old chef coats but I just brought my very own new chef coats from chefworks I ordered a black and white knotted button style small.  I'm only 17 and new to the restaurants industry I would like to know how to keep it clean,and some tips on buying and keeping chef coats nice.

post #2 of 11

Just as an aside, Travis, how are you finding a real-life kitchen as compared to your school experiences?

 

Didn't the coat come with cleaning instructions? Look at the collar label. One side will have the size and brand on it, the other side will tell you the make up of the fabric and how to care for it.

 

Most chef's jackets can be simple tossed in the washing machine (cool water cycle) and either hung or tumbled dry. Then, if necessary, a lick and a spit with an iron and you're good to go.

 

I know you're proud of your new coat. But keep in mind that despite what you see on TV, a chef's coat, in most cases, is not a fashion statement. It's a working tool. While you will agonize over every splash and stain, that's just the nature of the beast. While proper use of an apron and towels can minimize the staining, it is going to happen.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 11

Some food stains are very difficult to remove. They make sprays that are pre treaters put on before washing. Tide has a pencil type gadget that works well. A drop of clorox also works but weakens the fibers of the jacket over time. Many commercial renters use live steam to remove everything. Just work neat and it will stay clean.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

I have noticed that it is much different than high school,but I can compare lots of things.  I work the pantry,and I also have to do banquets so I have a scedule in which I must get certain foods and dishes done just like homework in high school.  I am enjoying my job very much. Next school year will be my last year in high school,and I'm taking up Culinary Arts Honors in high school,and I now know it will be super easy being that I'm working hands on in a real kitchen. Well I did'nt get the chef coats yet they should be arriving tomorrow,so I guess they will have instructions on how to clean.

post #5 of 11

Just don't get too cocky when school restarts.

 

When I was in the Navy there was a saying: Your Admiral might be right, and he might be wrong. But he's always your Admiral.

 

Same idea applies to your instructors.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 11

I've been around-the-block with chef coats. Some suggestions, Travis.

 

1. Before you wear the coat, examine the fabric label. If it says 100% cotton and the coat fits correctly, now...Return it for a larger size. They can shrink terribly; particularly those that are made of the finest Egyptian cotton (the real expensive ones). You don't want the coat to be baggy, but you'll need comfortable arm room and, in the heat of the kitchen, too tight is very uncomfortable.

 

2. If the coat is a blend of 65/35 cotton/poly, it'll have minimum shrinkage, but it will be warmer than 100% cotton.

 

3. Avoid chef coats that are the reverse, 65/35 poly/cotton. They really are warm and uncomfortable.

 

4. There are some chef coats on the market, reasonably priced, that are made partially of Cool-Max. These are relatively cool and vents your perspiration.

 

5. Look for chef coats that are 2% to 5% spandex and the rest cotton. They will give you great flexibility.

 

6. If color isn't an issue, try a 6-6.5 oz. fabric of blue chambray. After a few washings, this fabric is very comfortable.

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post #7 of 11

you can reduce shrinkage by air drying the jacket the first 5 washes or so. After that it can just hit the dryer.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

My mom said the same thing to me.

But I don't know how to not come across as cocky if I know the answers and have experience that the kids in my class don't have

 

 

I got my chef coats and I washed the white one and air dried it and it didn't shrink that much its not 100% cotton though.

post #9 of 11

best thing is, even if you know the answer...ask how they want it done, then do it that way....regardless.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #10 of 11

Pay attention to Gunnar's suggestion, as it will serve you in good stead even after you graduate.

 

You may know another way; even a better way. But Chef is Chef, and your job is to do it his or her way. Same in class. Your job is to learn it the way the instructor says. (S)he's in charge of that kitchen, and makes the rules.

 

As to already knowing the answers, never forget there are numerous ways of achieving the same end. Rather than saying to yourself, "hey, I already know that," you'd be better off thinking, "wow. Here's an opportunity to learn another way." With that attitude you might find that, sometimes, you didn't even know the question, let alone the answer.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

ok thanks for the advice. I will take it and use it.

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