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Question about Jasmine rice

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 

Given how much starch this rice puts out do you rinse your rice after cooking or leave it as is?

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post #2 of 37

rinse it before you cook it - try two good rinses and it will come out much better looking.

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post #3 of 37

I have never rinsed the rice after cooking it - but I always rinse it 5 or 6 times (until the water is clear) before I cook it. 

Also, I'd love to hear from anyone that wnats to share their method for "perfect", fluffy basmati rice... :)

post #4 of 37

Depends on the source of the rice. Packed in US I don't rinse before cooking. Packed outside, I usually rinse before.

 

I wouldn't rinse afterward. And jasmine rice is traditionally served a little sticky. It's a chopstick culture afterall.
 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 37

I never, never wash Basmati rice before and no rinsing afterward....you want to keep the integrity of the butter smell it naturally has and a little stickiness is good...when Im cooking I add a little olive oil and a chicken cube ... add some roasted pine nuts on top after its served...

post #6 of 37

Jasmine and basmati are similar but are not the same rices. 

 

A pantry can only hold so much and there are only so many different rices you can use.  We don't use Thai Jasmine too often, but when we do I usually don't rinse it.  More often than not I use it as the foundation for eating food on rice in a bowl -- Chinese style with sticks -- and it's nice to have it clumpy.

 

I'm not an expert on Thailand, Thai food or Thai culture, but when I do see Thai people eating rice it's more often with a spoon than sticks.

 

We usually do rinse basmati which I often use as for pilau or pilaf -- and for those we especially like to mix an aged Indian basmati like Zebra (which we hold for an extra year few months), with a fresh, inexpensive American type like Faraon or Texmati.  For things like arroz con pollo, I'll up the percentage of the American type; but for a regular side dish -- more aged Indian.

 

BDL

post #7 of 37

I rinse a few times, then soak for 30 min. before cooking  Perfect basmati.  I also prefer imported Indian basmati.

 

EDIT - SORRY-- I somehow mixed up that this ? was for jasmine and not basmati.

Ahh - JASMINE - yes, rinse prior (until water goes clear), and not after.  


Edited by ChefKC - 7/28/10 at 8:08pm
post #8 of 37

i leave it as it is . it tastes good~

post #9 of 37

I'm surprised that many people don't wash their rice before cooking it...I've been cooking thai and indian for many years and  have never 

heard any cooks say to not wash it first?

post #10 of 37
Thread Starter 

Do you rinse before basically to just make sure it's clean or does it also get rid of excess starch?

post #11 of 37

You usually do so for cleanliness.

 

Fortified rice should not be rinsed as you wash off all the added vitamins and minerals. I don't think most here are buying fortified rice.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 37

When I cooked for a boarding school that had mostly Asian students, one of the mothers showed us how to prepare the jasmine rice. She told us to "scratch" the rice. We would put the rice in a shallow pan with some water and run our finger tips through it much like scratching a person's back. We would do this with 3-4 changes of water. The water would never be clear, but at first the starch would look like milk. Then we filled the pan with water so it stood about 3/4" above the rice. We cooked it in a steamer for 20 min. but you can also cover it and put it in the oven. It will still be plenty sticky, but not gloppy. Too much water is what will really ruin it.

post #13 of 37

Well, since everyone is putting in their 2 cents:

 

I don't rinse jasmine rice.  It's the only rice I eat anymore, and I don't rinse it. 

I use organic rice.  Not worried about trace amounts of dirt or insects (extra protein ).

I rinse other rices though, for starchy reasons.

 

I don't really see an excess amount of starch given out from this rice compared to others.  It always flakes nicely for me.

And day-old cooked jasmine rice separates just by staring at it (for fried rice).

 

Perhaps your rice to water ratio is off?  Well, we all have our ratios.  Mine is 2:3.  Boil until you see air vents.  Cover and LOW heat for 12 minutes.  Depends on the age of the rice, but that's what I use.

 

Oh, and I should note that I have rinsed the heck out of jasmine rice before cooking in the past before deciding that it is unnecessary.  I can't see a difference.

post #14 of 37

I like Tilda basmati or jasmine, for best flavor.  Rinse twice before cooking, to get rid of excessive starch.  Rinsing after cooking takes away the starch to which sauces will cling.  Two methods of cooking:  2:1 water:rice, cooked with bay leaf, salt, bit of butter, cardamom and cumin;  or excess water completely covering rice during cooking, with no flavorings, then drain off the water after cooking.  Which way depends on what is served with or over the rice.  The starch in the rinse water has uses, too, says the book Cooking For The Maharajas.

post #15 of 37
We Asians always wash our rice before cooking--always. The type of rice determines how it's handled and cooked. Of jasmine rice, jasmine new crop is the best. Unlike the jasmine rice in the grocery store, new crop is from the current growing season. It will be labeled New Crop with the season year. As such, it was very fragrant and flavorful. And unlike the old crop rice, it not as dry, and much softer. So it's more fragile. It's washed with care. And it's cooked with less water. For Jasmine, the preferred method is steaming, not boiling the rice.

Americans usually add too much water and way over cook their rice. The amount of water is determined by the type of rice.

Asian rice is stickier, but sticky isn't mushy, gummy and clumpy. Grains of properly cooked Asian rice will cling together, but the grains retain a spring and wholeness.



@observer360: Tilda is old crop and as such, dry, bland, and without fragrance. It's really grossly over-priced grocery store quality rice. You can purchase far superior rice for a lot less at the Asian market.

@chefkc: you cannot soak jasmine. It will turn to mush if soaked. Basmati can be soaked. Persians soak basmati for a couple hours minimum; but ithey prefer an overnight soak. If you like basmati, I encourage you to try a Persian dish westerners call jeweled rice (Javaher Polow). I served this at a huge family celebration that included people who did not speak English. Non English speakers were coming up to me say, "Rice, Rice!" And shaking their head in approval. That was nearly five years ago, and just last week my brother asked me for the recipe because someone that attended the party wanted it.

This is not the recipe I used, but its similar. I like to let the rice rest in the pot for an hour or so after cooking to let the flavor develop. If you can get a good caramelization on the bottom, you will be in for a treat,

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-iranian-jeweled-rice-recipes-from-the-kitchn-194680
post #16 of 37

Ever since I attended the Sorbonne University with classmates from all over the world, I became a firm believer that if one wanted to start a world war, just initiate a discussion on the proper way to prepare rice!

 

I prepare basmati exclusively and it's rinsed a couple of times and presoaked for two minutes prior to cooking.  Mixed into the rice will be either black peppercorns or crushed cardamom seeds.  With the water evaporated, I add some saffron that's been crushed and soaked in water and on top of it I add a chunk of butter.  The rice then steams for several minutes and is stirred to distribute the butter/saffron mixture just prior to serving.

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #17 of 37

I rinse rice mostly because unless I can be very sure of the source, there is a possibility it has been processed with talc.

post #18 of 37
The Japanese tend to be very focused on new rice well-rinsed.

Chinese tastes are much more varied. There are serious gourmets passionate about fresh and rinsed, and others just as passionate that rice must be drier initially, and they may or may not believe in rinsing.

As Kokopuffs says, this is the kind of issue that can start a war.
post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radha8 View Post

I have never rinsed the rice after cooking it - but I always rinse it 5 or 6 times (until the water is clear) before I cook it. 
Also, I'd love to hear from anyone that wnats to share their method for "perfect", fluffy basmati rice... smile.gif
I use a heavy bottomed pot, bring liquid and rice just to a boil, cove and turn off the heat, leaving he pot on the burner as it slowly cools to serving temp. It seems to cook the rice perfectly every time and no need to keep an eye on it. Time the start of cooking to about 25 minutes before needing it.
post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisLehrer View Post

The Japanese tend to be very focused on new rice well-rinsed.

I think to some regard that is true. Certainly the most popular Japanese rice, koshihikari Is best consumed within a year of harvest. Some will insist it be consumed sooner.

But it really depends on the cultivar. In this case, the discussion is about jasmine rice. And with jasmine rice, new crop is essential to the quality. Throughout Southeast Asia new crop jasmine is prized for both its flavor and fragrance. Both of which are lost when the rice is stored for 18 months or more. That's why new crop is always labeled with the harvest year. If in export the rice is delayed getting to retailers, the label date gives the consumer a way to gauge how much the quality may be effected.
post #21 of 37

Never rinse Jasmine rice (or any other rice, for that matter).

 

See my prior post at http://www.cheftalk.com/t/81994/september-2014-challenge-rice/60#post_481368 about Jasmine rice

 

My post says bake 40 minutes, but at 30 minutes is a bit firmer. If your making fried rice the next day, after 30 minutes, spill out the cooked rice on a sheet pan, allowing steam to escape. Cool it well 40~60 minutes, then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until its needed.

 

If cooking sushi rice, after the rice cooks 30 minutes, remove the lid. Move to a cold surface, allow to cool, but, while just warm, add sushi saki-seasoned-vinegar, fluff with fork, corver with a damp towel.

 

Good Luck

 

Steve

post #22 of 37

I make rice very often, at least 3-4 times a week for dinner. In the pot I intend to cook the rice in, I heat abt 2-3 tablespoons of oil (usually vegetable but you can use olive oil if you want--- I don't recommend butter because it will burn). If the rice starts to stick, just add a bit more oil to help. I toast the rice until it is white, like a chalky white and gives off a wonderful aroma. You can season the rice as it toasts, but just be sure the seasonings don't burn. I add a teaspoon of salt for every cup of rice and it comes out perfectly seasoned every. single. time. Then add the water to cook the rice. For every cup of rice, use double the amount of water. So for one cup of rice, use two cups of water. Be careful when adding the water to the rice, it will bubble up, steam and make quite some noise. Bring the pan to a boil uncovered (I am usually rushed for dinner and turn my pot to high heat). Once it is a rolling boil turn heat down to low (very low, on our electric stove I turn it down to in between 1 and 2). I cook it for I would say 20 min, but to start to check at 10 min. Taste the rice to see if it is done. Turn off heat and fluff rice with a fork. 

post #23 of 37

Use warm water to rinse before cooking.This starts the slow cooking.

post #24 of 37

on rinse or no rinse.  check the rice before you cook.  some brands look like they were rinsed before packaging.  other brands create a cloud of dust when pouring into measuring cup.

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post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve TPHC View Post
 

Never rinse Jasmine rice (or any other rice, for that matter).


Any particular reason for that?

 

I typically don't rinse rice, because when I grew up I never saw rice being rinsed and didn't even know it was done. Now I've started rinsing (when I have time) but honestly I can't tell the difference in the final product, and since I'm trying to save water... I'd rather not rinse!

post #26 of 37

An additional side benefit to rinsing, other than washing off starch, is it also helps to rinse off arsenic. I usually cook brown rice and rinse under warm to hot water.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by xmdp View Post


I use a heavy bottomed pot, bring liquid and rice just to a boil, cove and turn off the heat, leaving he pot on the burner as it slowly cools to serving temp. It seems to cook the rice perfectly every time and no need to keep an eye on it. Time the start of cooking to about 25 minutes before needing it.


Liquid and rice to boil at same time or add rice to the boiling water?

post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpooley View Post
 


Liquid and rice to boil at same time or add rice to the boiling water?

  Usually at the same time but I sometimes will lightly brown the rice with a little butter or other fat before adding the liquid.

 

 

post #29 of 37

I like it.  I need a bit of rice for some rice crackers in the making and would like to try this method instead of hauling out the rice cooker for 1/4 cup

post #30 of 37

Our Pakistani friend taught me to boil pan of water, add rice to rolling boil, (I use 2 to 1) cook 8 minutes, drain, put back in pan and put dish towel over top.  Put lid on and hold for up to 1/2 hour.  It's always fluffy and light.

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