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Shore Lunch Tips and Tricks (what are yours?)

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

So if you have been around the forums much you might know that I go to Canada fishing every year. This year though I went to a different lodge White Pine Lodge in Sioux Narrows Ontario Canada. It is a great lodge and we spent one day with the owner (our guide) Jim and he made us an awesome shore lunch. Usually I end up cooking so it was nice for a change to have someone take point and just enjoy the day. I did of course help out.

 

I learned a couple neat tricks from someone who regularly makes shore lunch. One was after fileting all the fish they went into a bucket with the egg wash. No dipping the filet in one at a time then into the breading. After mixing the fish up in the bucket with the egg wash (which was already mixed up in a container) the fish went into a back with breading in it. Then more breading went in on top of the fish. Jim blew air into the bag and seal it and then shook the daylights out of it. Presto fish breaded and ready for the fry pan in less than 2 minutes. 

 

Usually when we go we fish for small mouth bass and use that for our shore lunch but this time we caught a ton of walleye and oh baby what a difference. I love the fight of the smallies but you can't dispute the richer flavor of the walleye.

 

Would love to hear what you do for your shore lunch and what your tips and tricks are.

 

Here are a few photos of my shore lunch. You can few the whole gallery by following the link below:

 

http://www.cheftalk.com/gallery/album/view/id/926/user_id/7889

 

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3b1cc37c_DSCN1076.JPG

 

 

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0cdc4fba_DSCN1089.JPG

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #2 of 13

Interesting that he's using carbon steel skillets, Nicko. Most guides I know who do shore lunches opt for cast iron.

 

I've known the plastic-bag trick for a long time; even use it at home, cuz it's about the cleanest way I know to bread fish. You do have to watch out that, as sometimes happens, a filet doesnt get wedged in the corner of the bag and be left behind.

 

One thing I do for my own shore lunches is carry a hunk of either slab- or jowl-bacon. Rendering that down provides the grease for frying, and the bacon provides an additional taste layer to the spuds.

 

All in all, I certainly agree with your assessment: Smallies for the battle, walleye for the pan.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

I like the idea of the slab bacon that is slick. Where you able to get into the gallery via the link I posted or did you get permission denied?

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #4 of 13

This one went right through to the gallery, Nicko. It was the other one that was denied.

 

One thing I just assumed was self-evident, but maybe needs saying. The breading mix should be predone. That is, your flour, cornmeal, whatever, plus any seasonings, should be mixed together at home, so it's ready to go.

 

Something else to stress: Note that your guide carries a grate to lay over the fire. Many times fishermen intending a shore lunch neglect that, and it can become a real chore trying to balance two or three skillets. Grates are cheap enough, and don't take up a whole lot of room in the boat.

 

One cautionary note: His appears to be the shelf from an old refrigerator; a common enough approach. But be sure, if going that route, that the shelf was not plated with heavy metals, as they can release toxic fumes from the heat. To be safe, I'd shoot the few bucks for an accessory grill grate and be done.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 13

Funny before reading this I never would of guessed someone wouldnt have ever done the breadding in a bag.  Been using this method all my life...and I thought I was getting more posh when I recently bought a thingy sold at Cabella's for bredding (basically 2 bowl with a strainer type thing in the middle.) it works but the bag works better! LOL

 

That will teach me for spending money on something that I dont really need.

post #6 of 13

By the way Nicko, looks like you had a good time up there. 

 

and KYH I agree about the choice of pan!

post #7 of 13

 

Indian Cornbread (great for frying up)

 

 

I spoke with my sister the other day and asked her about the Indian cornbread. I did not want to hijack the MG thread but wished to respond with an old Indian recipe that they make not far from here. There are a few good bakers and I was able to get a very good recipe that most of the Mohawks use .

 

3 Cups of corn flour

1 Cup white corn meal

½ cup quick oatmeal

1 can of red kidney beans (rinse beans)

 

Boil a kettle of water

Bring one large pot of water to a med/boil (hot but not boiling)

 

1- mix all ingredients together

2- while mixing , gently add hot water, you want the ingredients to shape together, not pasty, but dough like, so it takes on the shape of a ball that can fit in the palm of your hand, then flatten it just a little. (sort of looks like a hockey puck but rounder)

 

Gently place the 4-6 at a time. When the cornbread floats to the top, then they are ready.

This is great with a good gravy, sausage or steak.

 

But what I like to do is keep them in the fridge, cut them in half and fry them in butter , sprinkle salt and eat them with eggs and bacon. Perfect for camping. ( I miss camping )

 

These can be prepared way in advance. The Indians also used to put ash in their cornbread. When eating these you will find that salt makes it taste better and maybe a fruit chow....I shared this with a friend just now and just thought if there were any campers out there .....

The original recipe on how they “used to “ make these is a pretty long recipe with a zillion steps. It was like reading a thesis. So this is the short version.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 13

Happy you enjoyed Sioux Narrows. Stayed at White Pine years ago, but now have a place their. I am happy to see you are eating the correct fish now. Northern, cleaned correctly are wounderful also. We use canola oil instead of the old lard or bacon. It cuts the real fat and stuff down and does not mask the flavor of the fish. Just get the oil hot where your fish sizzles and the fish does not absorb any grease. Go to Fleet Farm and go to the sporting goods area and buy Andy's. Either cajun or plain.You can also mix them to cut the spice. Clean your fish,while wet, shake them in a bag or just dredge them good in Andy's and fry. No secret or majic, just perfect fish.

post #9 of 13
My favorite shore lunch is fish, potatoes (diced and blanched beforehand), carrots, and basically any other appropriate vegetable wrapped in foil with salt, pepper, lemon juice, and a little olive oil. Put the whole packet around the fire and wait a few minutes. Complete, delicious meal without the need for grates, pans, or huge fires. IMO, works best with trout.
"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #10 of 13

This thread was a great read! Thanks for the Indian Cornbread recipe too.

post #11 of 13

Very helpful information. thanks everyone 

post #12 of 13

Wow,

 

 

 

 

 

That was so great! I really enjoyed browsing it.I hope I can also experience this kind of lunch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #13 of 13

For me, I'm satisfied with just salt and pepper seasoning. biggrin.gif

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