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angry gripe - Page 2

post #31 of 34

Are you working downtown or in North Highlands?

post #32 of 34
chefwriter- thank you, I agree, and I think that's good advice . I was just gonna stay in Sac for a couple months, mainly just to talk to some people and find a good spot to get an apartment in SF, but now it's coming up on 2 years, the main reason for my delay is honestly a girl. I told myself I was never gonna get married, but now I'm thinking about it. I met her my first week here, at my first job, she is part of the reason I'm no longer at that first job.... I should know within the next 2-3 months whether or not I'm gonna marry this girl. Then I will make my moves to SF if I'm not going to be with her. If I am going to marry her , she does not want to go to SF and so we would go back to Chicago....

Chefbuba- I'm downtown/midtown...
post #33 of 34

Just curious. You do know there are several Michelin places in Chicago, right? You aren't stuck with SF or nothing. Going back home wouldn't be giving anything up. 

post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post
 

 

You'll find a lot of advantage of oil into a hot pan over oil into a cold pan.

 

You won't smoke the oil as badly as often -- that means you won't have to deal with the bad flavor and the gooey mess after it cools down.

 

You'll use less oil.  When it goes into a hot pan, it spreads really easily.  You'll find yourself using a tsp where you used a tbs.  The techniques of sear and saute are meant to be done with very little oil.  Food will taste better.

 

The pan will release better.  When the pan is already hot, the oil fills its pores better.  Or something.  I honestly don't know why it works, but it does.  If you want to go for super-non-stick.  Put some oil in a cold pan, heat it to warm.  Dump it out, wipe the pan, put the pan back on the flame, heat it, then add the oil you want to cook with.  Sort of an instant seasoning.  But I'm getting ahead of myself.  The "release point" is a very important point of sear and saute.  You shouldn't have to use a spat to get things moving in your pan.  It screws up the surface browning and screws up the fond.

 

Cooking with butter is a little different.  Obviously you use more butter than you'd use oil because it tastes so good, also you control the pan to control the browning of the butter as opposed to the browning of the food.  But... hint... Preheat the pan, take it off the flame, and add just a couple of drops of oil, swirl them, then add the butter still off the heat.  You'll not only temper the pan, but make it significantly less sticky. 

 

Keep your oils in the stove mise in squeeze bottles, or glass with speed-pour tops.  I was taught corn and extra virgin olive in a restaurant kitchen, and that's what I still do at home decades later.

 

I'm from a different time, and would have worked out who should have covered for whom and exactly what that meant either over beer or in the parking lot after work.  His choice.  Presumably those methods aren't available for you, the second one shouldn't be, and you're more rational than I was (doesn't take much).  Next time your "friend" asks you to cover for him, tell him sorry in the nicest possible way, and that you have to wash your hair.  Too bad. 

 

BDL

"The pan will release better.  When the pan is already hot, the oil fills its pores better.  Or something.  I honestly don't know why it works, but it does.  If you want to go for super-non-stick.  Put some oil in a cold pan, heat it to warm.  Dump it out, wipe the pan, put the pan back on the flame, heat it, then add the oil you want to cook with.  Sort of an instant seasoning.  But I'm getting ahead of myself.  The "release point" is a very important point of sear and saute.  You shouldn't have to use a spat to get things moving in your pan.  It screws up the surface browning and screws up the fond." quote
 


Metal as it is heated expands.  Its part of a process which we cooks use.  The pores actually vibrate at a higher frequency and are amble to be more malleable than usual.  This is also why pans get cracks, carbon filament, and the like.  This is also how treating and seasoning a pan works as well.  When heated the pores "Open up" when heated.  And as they cool, preferably slowly, the seasoning is left inside to treat the pan.  Or whatever metalware you are using.  This is part of the reason I only use stainless steel or Copper pans.  

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