or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Travel with creme brulee
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Travel with creme brulee

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I need to make about 20 creme brulees for a party, how can I make them in one kitchen and then travel an hour with them with out using a ramekin?

post #2 of 22

I'm not sure I understand your question... do you not want them in ramekins?  Or do you want to unmould them?

"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 

I want to make them in the ramekin but be able to transport them with out having them in.
 

post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zane View Post

I want to make them in the ramekin but be able to transport them with out having them in.
 

Huh? Peraps I do not understand, in my experience, Creme Brule is served in the ramekin.

 

I would cook them in the ramekins, chill thoroughly, pack in cold chest for transport, and torch the caramelized sugar just before service.

 

Why would you want to take them out of the ramekins?
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

Mix of lack of having 20 ramkins and I can think of innovated ways to plate them.

post #6 of 22

You can buy throw-away foil ramikins cheaply enough, Zane. Then, if you must (like Pete I don't understand the reason for it) unmold them on location, where they're more likely to hold together.

 

Unmolding means, among other things, that you'll be firing the bottoms, rather than the tops.

 

If your goal is a free-standing custard dessert, why not just go with flan to begin with?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #7 of 22

Wtf..good luck unmoulding a brulee!

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
post #8 of 22

Maybe you can line the sides with plastic wrap.

 

Yuck.

post #9 of 22

You seem like the the kind of guy that might give it a go 'cos its all in the execution...

Cut some rounds from a thin guage pvc downpipe that are just taller than your desired brulee.
Make a light caramel and pour hot in circles just bigger than your greased moulds on an oiled cookie sheet...lay them down and allow to set then scrape away the excess.
Make a stove-top brulee mix heavier on yolks or don't be shy to use a little flour or gelatin...your in the construction business now!

Fill your moulds, chill & transport.
To prep for serving...if the caramel is sticky to your fish-slice by now, heat the cookie sheet from chilled to carefully to 'dry' the caramel if necessary weight the moulds to keep a seal. Chill to set.
Flip on the plate, unmould with your purpose built plunger thing so as not to break the caramel...might work.
 

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
post #10 of 22

Zane...

If you plan to take your brulees out of the ramekins before you serve them, I suggest you add a few tablespoons of Plaster of Paris to the recipe.

 

Good luck  

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #11 of 22

Hm, are you "fixed" on Creme Brule?

 

Perhaps a Flan would work out better?

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Titomike View Post

You seem like the the kind of guy that might give it a go 'cos its all in the execution...

Cut some rounds from a thin guage pvc downpipe that are just taller than your desired brulee.
Make a light caramel and pour hot in circles just bigger than your greased moulds on an oiled cookie sheet...lay them down and allow to set then scrape away the excess.
Make a stove-top brulee mix heavier on yolks or don't be shy to use a little flour or gelatin...your in the construction business now!

Fill your moulds, chill & transport.
To prep for serving...if the caramel is sticky to your fish-slice by now, heat the cookie sheet from chilled to carefully to 'dry' the caramel if necessary weight the moulds to keep a seal. Chill to set.
Flip on the plate, unmould with your purpose built plunger thing so as not to break the caramel...might work.
 


Titomike are you refering to Creme Caramel?

 

I would stay with the ramekin .....it is meant to be with the mighty but soft Brulee
 

My feet are firmly planted in mid air
Reply
My feet are firmly planted in mid air
Reply
post #13 of 22


Gypsy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zane View Post

Mix of.... lack of having 20 ramekins and that I can think of innovative ways to plate them.

 

Our man Zane is daring to dream....I'd say this'll need to be the love child of a dark and mysterious panna cotta and... "the mighty but soft Brulee"                  .....

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
post #14 of 22

Are we actually talking about creme brulee?   Custards you sprinkle sugar on and then torch the sugar so it melts and forms a crackly, "brulee" crust when it cools? 

 

When and where are you planning to brulee them? If you're planning on doing the brulee before transporting, I don't think they can be unmolded to begin with, and even if the could, doubt they could be be transported without the custard collapsing or the top sliding off. 

 

I suppose you could make them very, very hard with a ton of gelatin like a cheap buffet pannacotta, but that's not exactly a creme and why would you want to do it anyway?   

 

Do you really want to brulee a creme after it's been unmolded?  Seems dangerous and pointless.

 

You could hollow out some oranges or small grapfruit, put a little zest in the creme, then mold, hold, transport, brulee and serve the creme in the peel "shells" I suppose.  Dated, though. 

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 8/13/10 at 7:22pm
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #15 of 22

It's possible to have an unmoulded creme brulee, it just takes a bit of effort.  However pre-bruleeing it is not recommended.

"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 

What about torching it in the ramkin and then soaking in warm water to make it unmoldable? It works with panna cotta why not brulee?

post #17 of 22

Zane,

 

Yes it works with panna cotta but have you ever did a test run with the ramekin ? Here is where your problem may lie, it will unmold in some parts, either the sides or the bottom but more than likely your dish will run, put heated water to any creme brulee and you will see within seconds just how fast it will melt, the temp cannot be controlled....you will unmold and it will melt fast, faster before you will have time to refrigerate it to save it.

 

maybe do a sample run.....but remember , there are 20 that need to be plated and decorated and out the door in a relative short time.

 

just a thought.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(161 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #18 of 22

To each her own, and I hasten to add that I'm barely competent when it comes to desserts, but the type of creme I make for and generally associate with creme brulee couldn't support itself outside of a ramekin, mold, cocotte or whatever, unless it was very, very cold. 

 

I couldn't imagine torching it, au naturel, that's for sure.    

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #19 of 22

Zane...

 

A brulee is set custard...set by cooking out the yolks. A pannacotta is set cream...set with gelatin. Both should have a perfectly smooth texture and just hold the cut of the spoon, by this standard neither should or can be turned out as they don't support their own weight.

 

Slightly more set pannacottas can but for the stress & wastage involved, imho, it's not worth the bother. I like them best in a martini glass where the shape, fleck, layering, saucing achieve visual appeal without the drama and the dish remains true to intent...imho.

 

If you want to tweak a brulee its best done in the flavouring...I've tried a cream/coconut cream mix then bruleed sliced bananas on the top...but couldn't get the texture described above. Orange and cardamom is my favourite...

 

So to achieve a turned out brulee you will lose the integrity of the dish with no appreciable 'point of difference' over a creme caramel, leche flan etc. In other words the design premise is weak to begin with. Your market research here is telling you ...why? ...wtf?

 

That said...The 'D' in R&D stands for development, we await your results with trepidation.

 

Or you cound expend your energy on a stronger concept...maybe sugar work on a  turned out, yolk-enriched pannacotta...

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
Reply
post #20 of 22

The "creme" custard for a brulee shouldn't be hard set, but barely set.  A great part of what makes the dessert good is the contrast in textures and temperatures between the warm, crackling brulee top and the soft, cool creme. 

 

The dessert is so trite and overplayed that you're either spot on or might as well use Royal flan, with some crushed butterscotch hard candies melted on top.  Actually, the second would be a great deal better than a great many creme brulees you find in many "fine dining" establishments.

 

I'm all for experimenting, but once before you're in quantities of 20 you should have a really good idea of what's going on. 

 

I think you'd be better off baking individual cheesecakes in mini-fluted tins, or even cupcake liners, unmolding them onsite into plates puddled with fruit sauce and bruleeing the tops, than trying to screw around with a creme.  At least you have a ghost of a chance they'll hold up. 

 

If you want to go retro with individual desserts, how about an excellent, biscuit type, fruit shortcake?  Blackberry maybe.  Not everyone can bake a good biscuit.

 

BDL

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #21 of 22

UHT Milk will provide enough fat for the Brulee to hold out of the mould. It's a slightly differant quantity of cream and milk to the egg and sugar though. Not very many people can actually get it cooked correctly though, it has to be absolutely perfect.

post #22 of 22


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titomike
...I'd say this'll need to be the love child of a dark and mysterious panna cotta and... "the mighty but soft Brulee"                  .....


Yes but then poeple will argue that it is not a creme brulee because a creme brulee is as much about texture as it is flavour. Heck I have made rice pudding brulee, pistachio, lemon, raspberry, you name it, but I still know how to do a classic one when required. BTW a classic creme brulee is served in a gratin dish, not a ramekin.

 

The requirement here is a free form creme brulee and timoltike is absolutely correct, the addition of a gelling agent will solve the problem. It may not be authentic, but it solves the problem. I know this is a fairly old thread but this recipe should work;

 

Freeform crème brulee

 

360g egg yolks

180g sugar

3.3g agar agar (3.3%)

300g milk

750g cream

1 vanilla bean

4g gelatine mix

 

For the gelatine mix

14g gelatine powder

60g water

 

Bloom gelatine powder in water, melt and reserve. Combine agar with half of the sugar and the remaining sugar with the egg yolks. Bring milk, cream, vanilla and agar to the boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the yolks and sugar and cook to 80C stirring constantly.

 

Remove from heat and add 4g of gelatine mix, strain and portion into molds. Refrigerate and caremelize to order. The added gelatine and agar prevent melting of the freeform crème brulee. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Travel with creme brulee