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cutting chicken before frying

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I generally don;t like jobs that require me to stand around waiting.  I hate making photocopies, I hate to stir things that just need to be mindlessly stirred, i don;t like standing around frying stuff.  But i do love fried food. 

 

So, when i fry chicken, i usually cut the pieces in half - that is, the upper thigh, i cut it along the bone, so one half has the bone and the other doesn't.  I don;t usually do breasts, but if i did i would cut them also into smaller pieces. 

 

My chicken seems to come juicy and good, and in half the time .  (I also do this when i roast chicken pieces, like in a pan with potatoes, at very high heat so they get crispy and browned and remain juicy inside). 

 

Is there any reason why people don;t do it this way?  Am I missing something? 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #2 of 16

Not necessarily the people on Cheftalk, Siduri, but, in general, most people don't even know how to break down a bird, let along take it to the next step as you do. That's why the markets sell more packaged pieces, nowadays, than whole chickens.

 

Plus I'd have to say that most people aren't quite that impatient, either.

 

In my own case, if I were going to go to the bother of half boning, I'd just go all the way, and make everything boneless. But that's just me.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 16

Well theres a great old trick....it's called BRICK CHICKEN ...you split the whole bird in half.....remove breast bones...olive oil up a cast iron pan and heat it on high..make sure you have some oven gloves around cause that handle gets hot! Marinate your flattened semi deboned bird in your marination of choice ( mine is simple olive oil, lemon juice oregano and S& P.

your gonna need two bricks for this dinner ...lol   wrapped in foil  Place your bird skin side down on that heated smokin pan and place your bricks ontop!....I know it sounds crazy but 10 minutes later , flip your bird..throw the pan into the oven and wow only about 5 more minutes at a 450 degree oven you got yourself a whole cooked chicken! Wonderfull crispy chicken

and soooo moist inside...be extra carefull ....with the cast iron it takes along time to cool down

 

I edited this because I spelled moist wrong  ...what a goof.....lol   


Edited by gypsy2727 - 8/13/10 at 5:50pm
My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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post #4 of 16

Siduri - risotto must drive you mad then hehe.  Gotta stir that one endlessly.

 

As for de-boning chicken, I tend not to do that.  It comes out to my taste a better flavour when the bones are in.  If you are pushed for time then sure fillets (thigh or breast) are a faster option.  I have to say my preference is to buy the whole bird then break it down as i like it.  But I do have spare time as I work at home, not everyone has that, ummm, luxury? (another topic totally :) ).

 

Your style of doing the chicken would be very time efficient, and very similar to the Oreiental way of piecing the chicken prior to frying.  Quick, tasty, crispy.

 

Gypsy,

 

I've heard of that and always have wanted to try it.....Question - does this squeeze the juices from the bird?  Just a thought. 

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #5 of 16

DC, the bricks do not squeeze out the juices. They serve two functions. One is to put enough weight on the spatchcocked bird so that as much of its surface area as possible is in contact with the heat. The other is to retain heat, like a cover, but without the steaming effect a cover would produce.

 

It is only effective with a spatchcocked bird. A chicken with the bones in would require a lot more weight before it could flatten down enough against the heat.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

Gypsy, that would be pollo alla diavola here - flattened and cooked under bricks.  They sell small chickens already prepared like that.  Never did it though. 

 

KY I don't bother to remove the bone because i love chomping on bones and i want to SAVE time not do more   I don;t fillet it though, because it would be too thin, i just cut through the thigh along one side of the bone.  Takes a second.  I usually only buy the thighs anyway, they're the best part in my book. 

 

And yes, DC, i don't do risotto like that.  I don;t like risotto and being the chief cook and bottlewasher around here, i have the advantage that i decide what to cook!  I do make risotto occasionally for the family, and don;'t bother with all the stirring.  I dump most of the liquid in after having cooked the rice in the butter or oil with whatever vegetable i use, and then stir it up vigorously every once in a while, otherwise it stays covered.  I add more towards the end.  It seems to come out as creamy as what i've seen elsewhere.  No one ever complains!

 

I have a theory - that the dishes italians hold most to heart as comfort food and home cooking all involve a woman doing endless mindless activity like stirring or rolling out.  Fettuccine, risotto, polenta, gnocchi... I think what is comforting is thinking of some poor mamma mia sweating in the kitchen!  most of the mindless labor can be avoided.  I make polenta and even the most suspicious of venetians (of the no-one-can-cook-polenta-like-a-venetian school of thought) had to admit that mine was perfect.  I stir every fiive minutes or so, when i remember, and cook it covered.  No lumps.  Gnocchi - don;t much care for the potato ones, but i make my own pumpkin ones by dropping directly off the spoon. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 16

Thank you for that KYH - I just had in mind a post I had a reply to in which I commented on, well, asked really, about benefits of pressing down a steak to get good grid marks and received an answer of a resounding no :)  Haven't tried to cook a spatched chook before but I may give this a go.  Got bricks - need chook.

 

Siduri - you sound the same sort of cook I am.  I never want to be chained to the stove just to make some food.  People will argue about what's a risotto and what's a pilau, but in the end, they are much the same.  Unless the cooking is done in a high end restaurant and people enjoy, I say blah to conventional methods, if I can make it work more easily.

 

This is why I don't make cakes......

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #8 of 16

People will argue about what's a risotto and what's a pilau, but in the end, they are much the same........................I say blah to conventional methods, if I can make it work more easily.

 

DC, you're arguing two different points, here.

 

First off, other than being made with rice, risotto and pilau are not the same, not even close. It's not a matter of taste or preference, but of definition. And, as you know, I get my nose a little out of joint over this, because pretty soon there will be no communication. May a well just divide food into two categories, cooked and uncooked, and be done. After all, a beefsteak made on the grill, and a pork shoulder slow cooked in the oven, in the end are pretty much the same as they are both cooked.

 

Making something work more easily is, of course, a different issue. The question you have to ask is this: Is it really the same thing made easier? Or is it almost the same thing (or a similar enough thing) as to make no never mind on my table?

 

I suspect the latter is what's involved. Nothing wrong with that, because now we are in the area of preferences and personal taste. But the fact is, risotto is a technique as well as the dish, and without the stirring---and it's effect on the starch---it is not a risotto---anymore than cooking something is a small amount of water is sauteeing.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 

KY, not liking risotto all that much I wouldn't put my hand in the fire over this (as the italians say) but I think that what I do make is not much of a pilaf, more of a risotto, in that it's creamy and has a similar texture to those I've tried when we've eaten out and someone orders a risotto and i taste it.  I stir it occasionally but vigorously, and it breaks down enough of the surface starch to make a creamy background to the rice - but i would not argue the point with a risotto expert or risotto lover.  I haven;t got the criteria, since i don;t care for it much.  (I like long grain white rice, boiled like pasta, with butter only - or rice in escarole soup. Can enjoy a nice pilaf with some kebab dish occasionally, other than that, i don't much like rice). 

 

But I agree that the shortcuts have to be ways to make something equal or equal enough for the eater's taste.  My mother in law would put fish sauce and mix it with rice and think she made risotto alla pescatora - definitely not!

 

About the chicken, my question was if smaller pieces are not generally used because the chicken doesn;'t come out as well, say, less juicy (a fillet would probably be less juicy, for instance) or if people just never think of doing it. 

 

DC, I make lots of cakes, and there i do follow the instructions pretty much, though I am not a gram-for-gram measurer, and my cakes come out great, even if i never take more than fifteen minutes from the decision of what cake to make to getting it in the oven.  Fifteen minutes would be a lot, and only for a complex cake.  But i love baking even more than cooking.  When i plan dinner, i begin with the desert!  It usually takes me quite a bit longer than fifteen minutes to decide what cake to make - consulting a stack of cookbooks. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

KY, not liking risotto all that much I wouldn't put my hand in the fire over this (as the italians say) but I think that what I do make is not much of a pilaf, more of a risotto, in that it's creamy and has a similar texture to those I've tried when we've eaten out and someone orders a risotto and i taste it.  I stir it occasionally but vigorously, and it breaks down enough of the surface starch to make a creamy background to the rice - but i would not argue the point with a risotto expert or risotto lover.  I haven;t got the criteria, since i don;t care for it much.  (I like long grain white rice, boiled like pasta, with butter only - or rice in escarole soup. Can enjoy a nice pilaf with some kebab dish occasionally, other than that, i don't much like rice). 

 

But I agree that the shortcuts have to be ways to make something equal or equal enough for the eater's taste.  My mother in law would put fish sauce and mix it with rice and think she made risotto alla pescatora - definitely not!

 

About the chicken, my question was if smaller pieces are not generally used because the chicken doesn;'t come out as well, say, less juicy (a fillet would probably be less juicy, for instance) or if people just never think of doing it. 

 

DC, I make lots of cakes, and there i do follow the instructions pretty much, though I am not a gram-for-gram measurer, and my cakes come out great, even if i never take more than fifteen minutes from the decision of what cake to make to getting it in the oven.  Fifteen minutes would be a lot, and only for a complex cake.  But i love baking even more than cooking.  When i plan dinner, i begin with the desert!  It usually takes me quite a bit longer than fifteen minutes to decide what cake to make - consulting a stack of cookbooks. 

I actually like risotto quite a bit.  I'm one of those folks who doesn't mind putting in the time if the results are worth it.

 

"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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post #11 of 16

Not to go back to the original point or anything similarly provocative, but like DC, I prefer chicken on the bone for some purposes and "nuggets" for others.  Any extra time and trouble taken for frying pieces on the bone is time and trouble well invested.

 

BDL

post #12 of 16

I agree fully. And fried chicken (I assume we're talking deep fried) should have the bone in, for several reasons.

 

If I understand Siduri's qualification, though, she's not separating the pieces into boned and not boned. Rather she's doing what amounts to a deep score, or a butterfly, of the pieces. This keeps them whole, with the bone attached, but makes the whole thing thinner so it cooks faster.

 

Not an approach I would use. But each to his or her own.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post
If I understand Siduri's qualification, though, she's not separating the pieces into boned and not boned. Rather she's doing what amounts to a deep score, or a butterfly, of the pieces. This keeps them whole, with the bone attached, but makes the whole thing thinner so it cooks faster.

 

Not an approach I would use. But each to his or her own.

Actually that's not what i was talking about, though i have done that too.  I meant i cut through and make the thigh into two pieces, not flattened or cutlet-shaped, not a fillet.  One piece has the bone, the other doesn't.   I just do it to take less time frying. 

 

I also do the same for roasting pieces of chicken in the oven on a flat tray at very high heat - like with a hot-and-sweet sauce, or with a rub or something.  I usually get home late and if i want chicken, i prefer doing this to having chicken breast fillets, which might as well be tofu.  But i wonder if i'm missing something.  I love a whole roast chicken, the juiciness is different to roasting chicken parts. in a good roast chicken i'll even eat the breast.  So maybe when i do have the time i should be using the whole thigh? Or is this irrelevant?

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #14 of 16

KYH - I take your point.  I am a home cook and anything that saves me time is a bonus.  Like Siduri, I don't care much for risotto, kind of take it or leave it.  So the way I do it suits us is all I'm saying. For the purists among us, no, this is not the way one does a risotto.  Still tastes good when your stock is good :)  Point taken about classifications.

 

Siduri,

I agree with you that a whole roasted bird can taste immensely superior to roasted parts. Perhaps because the moisture is kept inside for longer?  Don't know.  Maryland cuts (thigh and leg) taste pretty well roasted.  Maybe as they have more bulk than just pieces.  Drumsticksticks I haven't got the taste or the patience for - it could well be how I cook them but here they seem to be mainly bone and not worth it.  I prefer the wings to them.

 

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #15 of 16


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

I generally don;t like jobs that require me to stand around waiting.  I hate making photocopies, I hate to stir things that just need to be mindlessly stirred, i don;t like standing around frying stuff.  But i do love fried food. 

 

So, when i fry chicken, i usually cut the pieces in half - that is, the upper thigh, i cut it along the bone, so one half has the bone and the other doesn't.  I don;t usually do breasts, but if i did i would cut them also into smaller pieces. 

 

My chicken seems to come juicy and good, and in half the time .  (I also do this when i roast chicken pieces, like in a pan with potatoes, at very high heat so they get crispy and browned and remain juicy inside). 

 

Is there any reason why people don;t do it this way?  Am I missing something? 

 

 

The proper way to prepare and serve Chicken is to dissect both the breasts and legs in half... so that you have both an 'Inner and Outer' Leg and Breast.
 

The Outer Leg 'Drumstick' is served with the inner breast - and the Inner leg 'Thigh' is served with the outer breast.

 

 

on the bone or not doesn't matter, but serving half a chicken thigh is something that even KFC doesn't do. 

we're as good as our last meal.
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we're as good as our last meal.
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post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hi Coulis-o,

I'm not so concerned about what is proper, like in a restaurant or anythihng, i'm concerned if cutting the thigh in two before frying or grilling is producing an inferior product.  For me, you can take the breast and toss it, I have little interest in white meat of chicken, unless it;s part of a whole roast chicken and is very juicy. I would never buy chicken parts that include the breast.

 

Anyway, it sounds like you're talking about "serving" half a thigh, but i'm talking about parts that are cooked already as parts, and not stewed or sauteed, but fried or oven roasted pieces, cooked at a very high temperature, and if cooking half a thigh doesn;t give as good a result as a the thigh cut up along the bone in two pieces - that is cut before it's cooked.

 

My reasoning in cutting first is that it saves cooking time, always short when you get home from work at 7:30 or 8:30 most of the time, and boredom watching as your chicken fries.  I also like that it gives double the crispy outside surface, where,  in roasting, the seasoning is concentrated. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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