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Chef's and ego's? - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #32 of 39

There IS an objective and correct range of seasoning  levels (most definitely including salt) for restaurant cooking.  When someone like Tom Colicchio says "properly seasoned" or "beautifully seasoned," that's what he means. He doesn't mean the cook somehow managed to read Tom's personal tastes.  If you're going to cook in a high-end restaurant, you better be able to hit the proper level, and every time.

 

Home cooking, not so much.   

 

The "sunken eyed" French cook judging on Top Chef is Eric Ripert.  He can cook a little.

 

As a weird sort of side note, I find myself getting bored with my own cooking precisely because the levels are so consistent.  As we all know, spariety is the vice of life.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 9/6/10 at 10:32am
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post





GGGGEEEEZZZZZZZZZZZ, on my next trip to Rome I was going to invite you out to Dinner and a Concert, forget that idea..............EgoBillyB

 

As some have said... ego in itself is not necessarily bad.  If i didn;t have a pretty big one of my own, do you think I'd be bothering to write all these replies!?

 

And now i miss out on a great dinner and concert, all for that!  Not fair!!!

 

... but don;t touch my salt!

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #34 of 39


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

There IS an objective and correct range of seasoning  levels (most definitely including salt) for restaurant cooking.  When someone like Tom Colicchio says "properly seasoned" or "beautifully seasoned," that's what he means. He doesn't mean the cook somehow managed to read Tom's personal tastes.  If you're going to cook in a high-end restaurant, you better be able to hit the proper level, and every time.

 

Home cooking, not so much.   

 

The "sunken eyed" French cook judging on Top Chef is Eric Ripert.  He can cook a little.

 

As a weird sort of side note, I find myself getting bored with my own cooking precisely because the levels are so consistent.  As we all know, spariety is the vice of life.

 

BDL


I agree, unless you hit a certain level of seasoning the food will be bland, bland, bland. This is why when we go to restaurants the food tastes better (or at least it is should). Seasoning is one of the basic rules of cooking and one of the first things you learn as a cook. Yet when we have customers who don't want salt, butter or whatever we have to respect that, after all they are paying the bill. 

 

To deny the customer salt at the table is a little pretentious and to think that a chef can season pefectly for everyones palette is a little misguided. Another basic rule in cooking is that you will never please everyone all of the time as much as we all try. One man's perfection is another man's flaw.

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg View Post


Another great thread.

 

Greg, after a day like today, this is just what I needed. Thank you.....ever have such a good laugh and tears start to roll down ? I checked some other clips like the "illegal cheese" (when he was looking for Stilton) and the wooden cutting board scene....too much !

 

Salt and pepper on the table are not put out. This is the way the "Lady of the House" wanted it from the first day and its been that way ever since . If there is a question on any dish, they ask me. I taste 3 times before it gets plated.

I always make it a point to see the clients  two minutes after service to "see if everything is ok". I never viewed this an "ego trip" and since this thread has started it still does not affect my thinking on how I do things in my kitchen.

At home...........there is salt in 3 flavors offered.....guests come over , I want them to decide what they would like and what makes it nice is that saltier dish is small so it adds a bit of charm to the table.. Once its oversalted...there is no going back. To each his own, each person has a different palate to please.

 

 


 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply
post #36 of 39

Just had dinner last night at a top rated fine dining restaurant.....the chef-owner is young (early 30's).  Gratis snacky treats came out oversalted...seriously. My date took a bite of a few things and left the rest.  When the mgr asked if everything was OK he said NO.  I covered with a laugh and said he caught us in the middle of an intense conversation.  Owner came out at the end of service and talked for a while....I didn't wanna bring up negative shtuff in front of date/cooking client.  Deciding now whether to send mention it via email....or wait until Wed. farmer's market.....or just let it slide.

 

Tough being at the top of a pedistal, there's nowhere to go but down.

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #37 of 39

You know better then to let it slide. Your business ,like his thrives on recommendation of others and satisfied clients. If you are not told its bad, how can you fix it. You will be doing them, a favor by telling them Nothing wrong with constructive comments..EDB

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #38 of 39

I think the ego is connected to their feeling as an artist.
They have certain pride in their work and creations.

And they need some confidence to create new things.

And if their confidence is derrived from their cooking then you hurt their confidence when there is any negative remarks about their cooking.

So it's not real confidence but just an ego.

I love to cook. I love to eat. I really love to eat what I cook myself.And I also love working for Teake van der Meer in the Netherlands.
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I love to cook. I love to eat. I really love to eat what I cook myself.And I also love working for Teake van der Meer in the Netherlands.
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post #39 of 39

Ed, I'm with you.....but Martha just expressed it fairly succintly, I'm not into giving advice to people unless they want it.

The GM asked about our meal. The chef-owner did not.....but I guarantee he heard all the comments made from our table and also saw the plates come back.

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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