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Need help with metrics

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I'm in the process of a business plan to open a restaurant.  I'm trying to do my due diligence in research but am not finding metrics using google (probably just searching incorrectly).

 

I'm looking for data on how many covers a line cook should be able to produce during a rush, how much prep time is associated with a cover, how many covers one cook should be able to tend simultaneously, etc. 

 

Does anyone know of a reference site with such types of info?

post #2 of 6

It really all depends on what kind of restaurant.  Of course the more prep the easier it will be on the line.  Heck with everything prepped and precooked one cook could handle 200 per hour!

 

So what kind of restaurant are you talking about?

post #3 of 6

FWIW, I've been known to handle a little over 300 burgers/hour on a 36" griddle.

 

Then again 20 covers/hour in a single cook kitchen can be, shall we say, "taxing"?

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

The "cuisine" will be non-cuisine.  It'll be a mixture of Americanized Italian dishes and "American" food.  The food would be similar to Chili's and Olive Garden, and in that general price range.  Pete's gonna be my new burger chef if he'll move out to the middle of the sticks and leave that liberal stuff in CA (and work for $10/hour, which I'm sure is right near what he makes now :) ).  80-100 seats. Right now, I'm thinking about 4 servers, 1 bus/dish guy, and two cooks during peak times.  My job will be to look pretty (which I fail miserably at) and be a "floater".  I'm thinking about $5/hr on the servers and $10/hr on the cooks and busboy.  My desire is to pay better than most for good, quality folks.  I realize $10 isn't going to make anyone rich, but it's still a business.  I'm still trying to figure out the exact equipment.  I might end up with 5 or 6 burners and a 24" griddle over two ovens with a 65# fryer and a 24" grill.  That would give me 9', so a 10' hood would be sufficient.  I'm concerned that I may not have enough burners.  I forget which brand of range I was looking at, but they have the option of 2 larger burners in back and 3 normal burners up front.  I expect to have a large stock pot on at all times for pasta, so I want to be sure I'll still have usable front burners.  If push comes to shove, the griddle could hold the pasta pot.  I'm still trying to decide on the exact equipment, but for the purposes of a business plan, this should be a good starting point. 

post #5 of 6

I might put in two fryers.  80-100 seats and normal lunch/dinner hours with that kind of restaurant is pretty straightforward.   One grill, one saute, one salad person per shift.  Go down to two cooks about half an hour before closing.  One full time prep cook.  1.5 bakery and dessert.  One expediter in the window. That should cover it.

 

If you're in Disney World that'd be another story altogether.

post #6 of 6

I would recommend on writing your business plan for less than you think. Keep in mind, you are going to have a push when you open, then business may change a little. Employees are inevitably going to change rapidly until you find the one's you want, and who are going to stay. I'm not sure where you live, but if your paying your waitstaff 5 plus tips and your cooks 10 with no tips, you aren't going to keep much talent in your kitchen. I would recommend you start at 10, then once you decide whether the cook is going to stay or not, give them a raise. This will ensure your talent sticks around. As far as how many covers/plates and hour, it will entirely depend on the food. A crappy cook can throw out fried food very quickly, so it really depends on the menu. Look at the cook times for the longest dish, and figure that is how long each ticket will take. i.e. a baked fish dinner may be 20-25 min on a busy night because the oven is open alot and cooking at lower temps. This will be the longest thing on the ticket, so figure if you fill the rest. to capacity, and have 100 baked fish dinners, you are going to be able to fill your oven with 45? unless it's huge. This will give you about 80 dinners in an hour IF you have a good staff. Good luck

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