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My New Powered Ride

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I had put money down on an EBike a couple months ago from a local Daymak dealer.  Guy sold me on an Austin for the dual battery and anything else I would have wanted would have taken longer to get as they all come from China; I was considering 1 other bike but decided against it. 

 

So I checked my cellphone for messages as I left work, the dealer gave me the best news I've had in a long while. He was also nice enough to charge it for me so I picked it up and drove it home.  Even threw in a free helmet.

This is my first EBike but heres what I thought about it. Its a heavy MoFo but its not like I didn't know that, so balancing is a bit of a challenge as it accelerates. Acceleration; I go from 0 - 30kmph on a flat surface in about 10 seconds but going up hill like up Oakwood (a good 50degree incline), I can't get past 25kmph so I wound up pushing it halfway up. I drove this thing like a car on bike lanes where ever there was bike lanes; I'm a driver too so I know the gripes on both sides so I tried not to do what I know drivers hate bikers do like not signalling, etc. Signalling on this thing is retarded; its the same as any other bike/vespa type but the sound it makes is embarracingly loud. I wound up using hand signals with only a few blinks with my bike signals. From Richmond & Jarvis, I drove my new baby home to St. Clair & Oakwood (about 25km distance through city streets); on idle, battery drained only 1/5 but on full steam, battery indicator was about 1/3 charge.  The bike is rated for 80km on a full charge on flat land, nonstop, no wind resistance, with a 160lb driver so I can probably pull 60km.  I love that this thing has an alarm system; I opened up the locked storage case in the back without disarming the alarm (something I gotta get use to since I've never driven a car with one) and it went off pretty loud. Not ear popping but enough that the whole street would have heard.

I can't wait to take this thing around some more.

post #2 of 8

I really haven't been paying that much attention to the whole ebike thing, so forgive for asking, but what is the draw of these?  If you are going to purchase something like this then why not a moped or scooter.  I understand they are electric vs. a combustion engine, but other than that what are the selling points?  Seems like there are a lot of variables that factor into how far it can go. 

http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Well here in Ontario, you do not need a motorcycle license to own and operate one of these.  They don't move faster then 40kmph and still have pedals attached for manual power, otherwise they would be considered a motorized vehicle requiring a license.  As much as I would have loved getting a moped, vespa, or that 3 wheeled motorcycle but they all require an M license when I'm still trying to find time to do my regular G license.  Insurance also not required.  Now if this can or would be the same elsewhere in Canada or in the States, I'm not sure but this is the leading reason why they're selling like hot cakes.  I had a hard time finding one and still had to wait 2 months for it.

 

Those variables are the same with any motorized vehicle but what limits the EBike is the power behind the engine.  Obviously you'll get more speed, acceleration, torque; all around better performance from a gas guzzler.  These things are great for short distances of around 50km/day.

post #4 of 8

Thanks for the info.  Lilke I said, I haven't paid much attention to these and found the concept intriguing.

http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #5 of 8

I saw someone on one of those things a few weeks ago and wondered what the heck that was all about.

 

Headless, you live very close to where we lived when we lived in TO and I remember the Oakwood hill very well!  Try pushing a stroller up it in the winter...very not fun!

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

well it looks exactly like a moped, only difference is that it'll barely make a sound.  I won't be using it during the winter, the cold is apparently bad for the battery which I find strange as the battery is essentially just a lead acid car battery.  Besides, the tires aren't exactly all season but I'm gonna look into a set for those rainy days; because the bike is a bit heavy, the impact of whipping out on slick/slippery roads is greatly increased.  I've already ordered 2 locks plus a loop end chain with a manual mini pump and a tire repair kit.  I'm gonna look into some light reflective patches and decals to make myself more visible as my main intent for this purchase was for me to use to get into work on days I need to show up earlier.  I start 6:30am daily, takes me 30mins minimum using public transit, service in my area sucks, and the subways don't start running till 6am, cab ride costs me $25 with a tip which I don't always get reimbursed back. 

 

That Oakwood hill is difficult for most low powered vehicles; heck, the 63 bus can't go faster then 30kmph up that hill.  I'm gonna scout a different route tomorrow.  I'm looking forward to putting this thing through it's paces.

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

First usage report.

 

When I picked it up a week ago Friday, the battery drained substantially and I had issues charging it over the week.  However I found out something weird about my Daymak Austin dual battery.  I had assumed that the 2 batteries would work together, I figured the heavy power drain on my first ride was because my trip home is all up hill (mostly subtle ones except for 2 major hills) with my weight since I was also carrying a number of items.  It was not explained to me that I can manually switch between batteries by the dealer or the manual thats less then 10 pages large.  I found this out the hard way; the ignition has 3 positions like any other car (off, power, engine ignition) so I thought it worked the same way which I was wrong.  The positions is off, battery 1, battery 2.  Batt2 is like a backup, low capacity with low output; I drove home on Batt2 doing less then 35kmph.  Batt1 looks like the primary battery as I easily went 40kmph with very low battery drain; my trip to and from home drained the battery by maybe 1/6.  I found this out when I turned my bike off and saw the battery capacity indicator jump to full from 1/2. 

I made it into work in 40mins, same time it takes for me to take the TTC into work with some waiting and I did it all without violating any traffic laws or signs.  On my way back, I tried to stay on bike lanes as much as possible as 40kmph is my max.  Some areas are a bit tight especially if I wanted to overtake slower bikers but I thank my driving school for teaching me a lot of what I use while on the road even on my Ebike.  I tried going up the Christie hill which isn't as steep as Oakwood but its a longer hill and I had just as much trouble going up as on Oakwood.  Oakwood is a steeper but shorter hill where as Christie is longer but with an easier angle.  I still wound up getting off the bike and dragging up the hill.

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

*UPDATE*

we had a few windy and wet days early/mid September and those days really put this bike to the test. 

 

On windy days.  Against the wind on a full charge, the bike has no problems but the drain on your battery is more substantial.  Wind caught up to a good 70-100kmph and going through those intersections where a sudden gust of strong wind goes against the side of my bike is enough to drift your bike into the middle of the driving lane.  It happened to me quite unexpectedly. 

 

On rainy days.  Obviously glasses or goggles come in handy, rain hitting your face while doing 40kmph isn't fun for the eyes.  The tires grip fine but turns need to be taken much slower however, one should avoid going over wet metal surfaces.  I wiped out twice now while driving over wet street car rails. 

 

Something else I found out about the battery on my bike but I haven't confirmed it yet.  I sometimes find going up hills while on my 2ndary battery works better then going up on my primary even at a full charge.  Though my bike goes slower on my 2ndary, it seems to have better torque and more consistent acceleration. 

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