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Sani-tuff boards - Are they as easy on knives as a wood chopping block?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Title says it all.  I'm considering a sani-tuff or two until I get a large quality chopping block from BoardSmith or Michigan Maple Block.  I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with these and how they compare to a quality end grain chopping block when it comes to your nice sharp knives.

post #2 of 5

They're OK, but not great.  They don't feel like wood does through the knife; and they're not as easy on the knife as endgrain wood.  I'd rather have a decent long grain (as opposed to end grain) wood board which is no harder on the knife and easier on the hand. 

 

On the plus side, they're inepxensive, relatively transportable, easy to renew with a plam sander (but so is wood), don't require oiling, don't warp and don't crack.  I'm currently working a largish bamboo board as my third full size board, and rate it about the same overall as a Sani-Tuff -- although their respective strengths and weaknesses are different.

 

Certainly the best of the non-wood alternatives both in terms of being kind to your knife and not punishing your hand.  Off hand, I can't think of any other non-wood board I'd use with my own knives.   

 

BDL

post #3 of 5

No, not as good. I bought a big one and a medium one when I got back from Kyoto, because my nice butcher block endgrain board is much too small. I've used them for a year, and my results are not great.

 

They scratch and scar easily, and don't heal themselves at all. They don't feel nearly as good under a blade. They have a tendency to warp a bit if not laid perfectly flat, but to be fair they also un-warp in a few days if you put them flat again.

 

My current plan is to buy a big beautiful endgrain, then saw my big SaniTuff in half to make two smallish boards. My medium SaniTuff I will retain for butchering chickens and such, because it's nice that when I'm done I can shove it in the dishwasher and ignore it. The two small boards I'll use here and there when there's a need, and know they're good and dishwasher-safe. But the big endgrain will be the principal board for everything normal.

 

On the whole, I'd say, coming back to your exact question, that the boards are pretty decent on my knives. But my knives are not so nice to the SaniTuff boards, which is very irritating.

post #4 of 5

Don't use a cleaver on them. My knives sometime make cuts in them that stay in them.I like them cause they come in colors. So I can have a color for all different items I cut.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

OK, thanks all.  For me, it sounds like good wood boards are the way to go.

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