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Savory Macarons?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Im trying to make some macaroons.

 

Trying to be creative, this idea comes by.

 

Im trying to make a Cheese feeling macarons, i have no idea which kind of cheese should i choose.

I have no experience on cheese due to here low demand on Cheese.

 

Pirere Hermes salted caramel macarons inspire me to make savory macarons.

 

Thx Chef

post #2 of 10

Made green olive macarons the other day - not exactly savory however.  The standard Pierre Herme macaron with some green colour as well as a little bit of cocoa to get an olive green.  Buttercream made with whole eggs and yolks into which I mixed a whole lot of chunks of green pimento stuffed olives.  They were fabulous - nice salty hit to foil the sweetness.  

 

DSCN1230.jpg

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thank you Chef =)

Any chance could get the buttercream recipe?

post #4 of 10

We did bacon maccaroons with some old bacon we had. Just cooked it to render all of the fat and ground it fine, we added it along with the almond flour and filled it with a bacon onion marmalade. Cutomers thought it weird but I liked it.

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post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alric Tong Kwan Seng View Post

Thank you Chef =)

Any chance could get the buttercream recipe?

 


  • 1

 

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • ¼ tsp cream of tartar
  • 125 grams sugar
  • 75 grams water
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 200 grams unsalted butter, room temp
  • 250 ml container of green olives, diced

 

Start the egg and yolk beating in the mixer with salt and the cream of tartar.  Boil together sugar and water and bring to 116C.  

When it reaches 116, drizzle in to the beaten eggs.  Cool to room temperature.  Add butter, if separates heat slightly to bring 

together.  Add chopped olives.  

 

Makes a pretty small batch - was just an experiment - but a successful one!

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rat View Post

We did bacon maccaroons with some old bacon we had. Just cooked it to render all of the fat and ground it fine, we added it along with the almond flour and filled it with a bacon onion marmalade. Cutomers thought it weird but I liked it.


Bacon Macaroons! Nice! Never even heard of it. I will do research on it hehe =) thx Chef

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chocdoc View Post



 


  • 1

 

  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • ¼ tsp cream of tartar
  • 125 grams sugar
  • 75 grams water
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 200 grams unsalted butter, room temp
  • 250 ml container of green olives, diced

 

Start the egg and yolk beating in the mixer with salt and the cream of tartar.  Boil together sugar and water and bring to 116C.  

When it reaches 116, drizzle in to the beaten eggs.  Cool to room temperature.  Add butter, if separates heat slightly to bring 

together.  Add chopped olives.  

 

Makes a pretty small batch - was just an experiment - but a successful one!


Woah. What a great recipe =) Ill tried it after my exam. Thx you Chef ^^

post #7 of 10

I'm wondering what the cream of tartar does?  I feel like I should know this, but I don't! 

Sounds like a great recipe & one I'll be trying.

post #8 of 10

Cream of Tartar is an acid which essentially chemically cooks the egg and hardens your product.. Its what makes Royal Icing harden.

post #9 of 10
Actually cream of tartar does not "cook" the whites. excess agitation (whipping) causes the protein molecules to bond excessively to their neighbors and gather together in masses (coagulate). At that point they can no longer do their job on the watery bubble surface. The forces of surface tension start to take over again and the bubbles start to pop. The foam turns grainy, then clumpy, then watery, at which point it’s pretty much useless. Cream of tartar as well as other acids, or the copper ions found in a copper bowl preemptively plug up the proteins’ bonding sites Acids don’t affect the proteins’ bonding sites directly, though by changing the pH of the mixture they increase the number of free hydrogen molecules, and they gunk up the works quite nicely.
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post #10 of 10

I've been thinking of rosemary orange macarons lately.  I haven't made them yet but i;m thinking finely ground rosemary in the cookies then orange italian buttercream for filling. 

 

If you want to make cheese filling you need to find a way to make it smooth/creamy.  Maybe mix a cream cheese, goat cheese or queso fesco with a tangy finely shredded cheese like manchego, or extra sharp cheddar. 

 

We make raspberry cheesecake macarons in the resteraunt right now that have a circle of baked cheesecake in place of a creamy filling.  We make a french cheesecake and bake it off in sheets then cut it out the size of the cookies.  If you use a recipe for savory cheesecake just remember to consider how it will pair with the sweet shell.

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