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Durability of SAF Red Instant Yeast

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

My one pound package of SAF R.I.Y. was purchased in Nov/Dec 2007 and in between uses, has been stored in the freezer in a glass Le Parfait container graced with a wire spring bale and rubber gasket for good preservation.  Today, 19SEP2010, the last of that pound of yeast was used in making my weekly batard consisting of 6C flour, either KA AP flour or bread flour from Weisenberger Mills of Kentucky.  And part of that 6C of flour was made into a poolish approximately 8 hours preceeding making the final dough.

 

The one pound package of yeast made approximately 125-150 two-pound loaves and its activity never seemed to waiver. The yeast seems just as active now as it did way back at the end of 2007.

 

Just an fyi.

 

TIA

-TK


Edited by kokopuffs - 9/19/10 at 1:19pm

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #2 of 11

Shouldn't come as a surprise, Koko. Frozen yeast is merely yeast in a dormant state, and it perks back up as soon as growth conditions (i.e., warmth and moisture) are provided.

 

What this really demonstrates, though, is the economy of buying in bulk.

 

Two weeks ago, while stocking up at Weisenberger, I bought a new package of SAF. Cost: $3.15 for the lb.

 

Last week the local market had the 4-ounce jars of instant yeast on sale for $4.53 (normally $4.95). I was looking for something else, and just happened to notice.

 

It gets worse. For a particular project, recently, I needed active dry yeast---which I hardly ever use. So I bought a strip of those 3-up envelopes. $1.99. for the least expensive brand.

 

So look at the math. $1.99 for 3/4 ounce of yeast means .66 per quarter ounce. Extrapolating out we're looking at more than $42/lb---roughly 14x what it cost to buy in bulk.

 

That aside, is there a particular reason you transfer the yeast from the package it comes in to that glass jar?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

...That aside, is there a particular reason you transfer the yeast from the package it comes in to that glass jar?...


I transfer the yeast to a sealed jar for the better sealing it provides as opposed to a sack that's been 'tightly' rolled closed.

 

Oh and lucky you.  By the time a 25# sack of Weisenberger Bread Flour along with a pound of SAF arrives at my door in south Georgia, the price for both approaches approximately $40 including s&h.  8~{
 

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #4 of 11

Ahhhh, I see. I merely roll it, and clip it with one of those spring clips designed for chip bags and the like. Never had one open in the freezer.

 

I well appreciate what it costs to ship things nowadays. Remember, where I live, almost anything you'd want to cook with is a specialty item that has to be ordered on-line.

 

Next time I drive down to Florida I'll stop at the mill, first, and bring you down whatever you need.

 

Cost aside, how did you like the Weisenberger compared to King Arthur?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

I enjoyed the bread very much, with a crumb perhaps slightly softer than the KA's Bread Flour counterpart.  And in using W's flaour, I learned first hand what the addition of diastatic malt aka malted barley does to the dough.

 

And yes, next time you're down in this area near Waycross, one hour west of Brunswick, let me know and I'll order a 25# sack of their bread flour.

 

Best,

-T

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #6 of 11

So you did add the diastatic malt? How would you say it affected the flavor and handling characteristics?

 

Yeah, I'd say the W would be a little softer. It's bread flour comes in at 12% protein, whereas, if I remember correctly (and we don't want to take that to the bank), KA is around 14%. And KA already has the malt added. W has a high gluten flour that's 14%. I've played with it, but don't care for the flavor.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

In researching how much d'malt to add, I arrived at just 1/2 teaspoon d'malt per 3 C of W's bread flour.  Without the dm, the rise is excruciatingly slooooowww.

 

And their bread flour's protein content clocks in around 12.5-12.7% protein (just like KA's bread flour).  This here protein number is what I was given by a Weisenberger rep thru an email.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #8 of 11

Hmmmmmm? When I asked at the mill, two weeks ago, they said 12%. Not that it matters all that much. But I had it in my head that KA was higher. Go figure.

 

I don't mind the slow rise, as I use retarded fermentation techniques almost always. If I need to kick up the speed I just add a tiny splash of sugar cane syrup. I mean tiny; maybe half teaspoon? I eyeball it.

 

Lately I've gotten into the habit of adding the salt as the last step (that is, after the liquid is incorporated. I've convinced myself that this makes a difference, but don't ask me to prove it, cuz I can't. What I think is happening is that the yeast has a chance to start working before the salt retards its growth. Basically, the benefit you get by blooming active dry yeast.

 

Not to get all fashionable, but I do find that with the W, French folding helps the rise as well. I suspect it has something to do with making more oxygen available, but, again, have no real evidence one way or the other.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

IMHO

 

With french folding, you're creating not only more surface tension but also adding to the chewiness of the bread itself. 

 

Diastatic malt contains enzymes that will break down the starch into sugar to give not only more food to the yeast but also the added sugar contributes to the bread's flavor!

 

Once the yeast is totally dissolved and "evenly" distributed into the poolish along with the other ingredients, the salt is finally added.

 

 

Along with Beranbaum's The Bread Bible, I strongly recommend getting a copy of BREAD by Hamelman to explain some of this stuff.  The layout of these two books I find simpler and better explained than what I've read in the Bread Baker's Apprentice and Crust and Crumb.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 11

Thanks. I'll look for the Hamelman book. I've read The Bread Bible, but actually found BBA more understandable.

 

Here's the thing with the diastatic malt. Everything claimed for it is accomplished by retarded fermentation. So, I think, it's more a matter of the amount of patience one has. Me, I'm willing to wait. Even on a first rise, if it takes two hours it takes two hours. I can find something else to do while the dough does its thing.

 

I'm thinking, though, that for non-retarded breads the DM probably makes sense. But I'd want to do it like you do, adding it to the batch I'm working on, rather than having somebody else put it in for me.

 

Either way, I reckon it's getting time for me to order some, and see what differences it makes.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

I get my D.M from KA and you could probably find some at a well stocked health food/organique store! 

 

Hamelman's book, although written for the advanced baker that I THINK you're aproaching by virture of your retards, has easy-to-read recipes written for 'large volume' (read bakeries) that have been scaled down for the home baker like us: 1-3 pound quantities. 

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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