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sweet potato chips

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I attempted to make baked sweet potato chips today. I sliced them into little rounds, patted them dry, put them on a preheated baking sheet, salted them, and baked on each side for 10 minutes or so in a 425 degree oven. The edges crisped beautifully but little bubbles began to form on the potato, and the inside of it was not the crisp texture I craved. I have a feeling the slices were not thin enough and that is what caused the texture but what caused the bubbles? Any suggestions for a better, crisper, sweet potato chip?

It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #2 of 24

I would guess two things, or a combination of them. Yeah, they were probably too thick. Sweet potatoes contain both a lot of moisture and a lot of sugar. Concievably, the bubbles where formed by steam lifting carmelized sugar.

 

I would guess, too, that your "chips" were not very chip like in the end, but had soft centers, more like a baked sweet potato.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 24

Try slicing with a Mandolin(real thin) spray with a dash of Pam.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 24

I would soak the raw chips in iced water for a bit before patting them dry.

post #5 of 24

A quick way for a garnish is to peel long strips & deep-fry...submerge and 'stir', lift before you have your desired colour as they'll keep darkening as they drain...use a julienne peeler and you have straw potatoes.

 

5mm rounds done slowly in duckfat (Sarladaise) will crisp up on the reheat...like double dunking fries for extra crispy...with a thinner round, might work with your original method.

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #6 of 24

There's an actual dish where you want the potato slices to puff into big bubbles. Can't think of the name though.

post #7 of 24

Did you drizzle any olive oil on them?

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

There's an actual dish where you want the potato slices to puff into big bubbles. Can't think of the name though.


I believe you're thinking of "pommes soufflées" a.k.a. "pommes de terre soufflées":

 

posou10.jpg

post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 

Holy smokes, thanks for all the replies.Titomike, your ideas sound delicious but the whole reason I've started playing with sweet potatoes is because I'm working at eating healthier. As delicious as deep frying and duck fat sounds, I'm gonna have to pass on them for a little while.French Fries, nice to see you again. Why would you soak them in ice water? Am I missing something there? Kirsten, it wasn't olive oil but I did spray them with pam to help crisp and help the salt stick.

 

I will drag out my slicer the next time I make them, and I have more sweet potatoes waiting for sacrifice. The puffy thing, pommes soufflées looks good too. That is going into google. 

 

Thanks for all the feedback guys.

It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gummy-Bear View Post
French Fries, nice to see you again. Why would you soak them in ice water? Am I missing something there?

 

I was afraid you'd ask.

 

The truth is I'm not sure why, but it does make them crispier, even if you fry them much later. Maybe some kind of reaction with the starch? Anyway if you have time next time, maybe try soaking one batch in ice water, see if you notice the difference?
 

post #11 of 24

Potato Souffle . Cut thin then cooked, then chilled then cooked again in hot fat served right away

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 24

Did you say salt?? salt will tend to make soggy, as it draws moisture in particular before cooking.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post



 

I was afraid you'd ask.

 

The truth is I'm not sure why, but it does make them crispier, even if you fry them much later. Maybe some kind of reaction with the starch? Anyway if you have time next time, maybe try soaking one batch in ice water, see if you notice the difference?
 

 

For you, I will try it and let you know.
 

It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Buchanan View Post

Did you say salt?? salt will tend to make soggy, as it draws moisture in particular before cooking.


I didn't think I put that much salt. Would a little bit have done the trick? Maybe a combination of the thick-ish slices and the salt. I have a feeling I'm going to be needing more sweet potatoes.

It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post




I believe you're thinking of "pommes soufflées" a.k.a. "pommes de terre soufflées":

 

posou10.jpg


Man I love Pomme Souffle. Trying to get them right is always a challenge. Eating the rejects of course is half the fun........

post #16 of 24

Talk about healthy....!  Baked sweet potato chips.  Love this.   I wonder how thin you could get them with a vegetable peeler?  Haven't tried the ice water bath, but sounds like a good idea.  Thanks for the post - I'm going to try this, too!  Ruth

post #17 of 24

I adore sweet potatoes and will try this :) mmm mmm

this is the best board ever! :)

 

great ideas :)

post #18 of 24

is because I'm working at eating healthier.

 

Talk about healthy....! 

 

Can somebody please explain to me exactly what eating healthy means? I get more and more confused everyday.

 

For instance, as compared to white potatoes, it's true that sweets are lower in calories. But on almost every other important measurement, white potatoes come in better. They are significantly higher in protein, almost a wash so far as fat content, have more than twice the dietary fiber, have slightly more calcium, and are either equal or significantly higher in important vitamins. While it's true that white potatoes are twice as high in carbohydrates, a significantly lower proportion of them are from sugars.

 

Here's the breakout. In each case the figures are based on 100 grams, cooked in their shells, without salt. The first figure is for sweet potatoes, the second for white ones. In terms of serving size, 100 grams is approximately 1/2 cup:

 

Kcal:  86, 198

Protein: 1.57 g, 4.29 g

Fat:  .05 g, .10 g

Carbs: 20.12 g, 46.06 g

Dietary fiber: 3.0 g, 7.9 g

Sugars: 4.18 g, 1.4 g

 

Calcium: 30 mg, 34 mg

Vit C: 2.4 mg, 13.5 mg

 

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #19 of 24

KYH, figures don't lie! It is OBVIOUS! Sweet potatoes have only 43% of the calories of white potatoes BINGO!

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #20 of 24

So, Pete, are you saying that the only thing that counts in "healthy" is the calorie count; and the rest of nutrition can be tossed out the window?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

So, Pete, are you saying that the only thing that counts in "healthy" is the calorie count; and the rest of nutrition can be tossed out the window?


Why of course, why else would that be the most important fact to list on menu boards and menus?

 

I mean, nobody needs all those "nutrients" anyway, we just "take a pill" or "sprinkle some powder" on our food, besides, we can drink some "vitamin water" as well

 

 

TFIC!

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

As far as I know, sweet potatoes have more vitamin A and potassium but this was not a conclusion drawn by extensive research, I admit. I'll look into it more though, because it seems that sweet potatoes are always claimed healthier and now you have me all confused.

It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #23 of 24

I'm not trying to make the case for one over the other, Gummy Bear. In fact, we love sweet potatoes, and eat a lot of them in this household. But not because we think they are more healthy. Other than worrying about my diabetic darling, I legitimately don't understand what people mean by healthy eating, and potatoes just highlight the problem.

 

I, obviously, didn't list all the nutritional values. To do so I'd still be typing the list. So I chose representive ones that I thought most people relate to.

 

For the record, sweets are considerably higher in Vitamin A, coming in at 961 mcg, versus only 1 for white potatoes. I have no idea what mcg is, but it's the relationship that counts.

 

Potassium, however, is one of those that white potatoes have more of: 475mg for sweets vs 573mg  for whites. Is 100 milligrams in a hundred gram serving significant? Depondent sayeth not.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #24 of 24

So, OK. FWIW, I checked with my chemistry teacher friend, and an mcg is a microgram. I'd kind of figured out that much, but still didn't know what it mean. A microgram is one millionth of a gram, or a thousand milligrams.

 

Anyone interested in that should make a note, cuz by tomorrow I won't remember it anymore.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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