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Doesn't anyone like catfish? - Page 2

post #31 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

We're definately talking to different people, Dan. Although neither Friend Wife nor I particularly care for catfish, we're in a distinct minority. I don't know anyone else who doesn't swear by it.

 

Who is Jim Hunter?


Jim "Catfish" Hunter, hall of fame pitcher.

 

Some people swear by catfish other swear at it.

 

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post #32 of 63

By the way, anyone looking for less common catfish recipes might check out: http://www.the-outdoor-sports-advisor.com/catfish-recipes.html

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #33 of 63

Gee-sus, Abe...

 

I don't know from kosher, but what the hell  is that thing and what's the problem kosher-wise.

 

Could be a lot of fish nuggets going to waste! 

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #34 of 63

nice website ky....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #35 of 63

Live on the Chesapeake and although there have been vast improvements in protecting our fisheries, the evidence here is that the damage is done and not likely to get any better in my lifetime. Maryland's largest industry is agriculture, so is New Jersey's for that matter, and this tends to surprise folks. Unfortunately that just means that we have an abundance of agricultural pollution to go along with our industrial and consumer pollution.

 

Between the chicken waste, hog waste, lawn fertilizer, waste water treatment plants and chemical processing we do everything we can to keep the Bay dead. Algae blooms, heavy metal poisoning, oyster and fish killing bacteria have made the eating of the Bay's offerings a very dicey affair. Personally I'd rather risk Gulf oil absorbant poisoning than eat anything out of the Chesapeake. 

 

Thirty years ago I used to fish the Bay commercially. We harvested crabs, oysters clams, and fish in relative abundance. Today those same beds are all gone. Crabs that I used to catch in an hour now take a full day or more to find. Oysters...forget about it. Even the ever optimistic State government has finally begun issuing more realistic warnings about the safety of eating not just too much, but anything from many of the Bay's tributaries. You don't have to be a marine biologist to understand it all. Just look at a map.

 

Major drainage basins such as the Mississippi, the Delaware, The Hudson, the Potomac and the Chesapeake all empty some of the most heavily populated and industrialized areas of our country, not that the No Till agricultural run off gives them much of a break. The Chesapeake suffers more than most because it is reliant on tidal action to flush it out. Unfortunately that outflow only occurs a couple of times a day, unlike the constant flow of a river. Just look at a map and think of all of the crap that people have been throwing and pumping into your waterways and you'll get a pretty good idea why farm raised cats and northern glacial lake walleye taste superior to the wild mutants from the giant cesspools.

 

Eating channel cats of any size from the Bay is not just a risk but a guarantee that you're eating toxins. About the only thing around here that most people will risk are the striped bass since their migrations and natural ranging for food regularly takes them out of the Bay and into open water for a big part of their life.

 

Maryland seafood used to be some of the finest in the world and today the majority of it is a heavy metal, bacteria laden crap shoot. But hey, I wouldn't worry about it...the gubmint's got it all under control. We just need to keep giving them more and more money so they can fix our water and air the way they've fixed our schools and economy.

 

Sorry for the O.T. rant (and I'm new here) but it just straight pisses me off that I used to be able to feed my family with what I could catch at the end of my pier and now I'm afraid to dip a toe in it.

 

Catfish is terrific though and anyone who hasn't tried it is really sellin' themselves short. Usually a relative deal too compared to the oft available alternatives.

post #36 of 63
Catfish was a staple when I was growing up. It was definitely the fish we ate the most, but not my favorite fried fish. That distinction goes to the sac au lait, which Yankees will call a crappie.
"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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"We make our food; thereafter, our food makes us." - Winston Churchill (with a slight modification)
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post #37 of 63

the question is how fast would it eat you? there are species of catfish wiht some nice sharklike teeth that are known maneaters too.

 

The real bad rap for catfish is  some don't like fish and catfish can't be made to taste like chicken.  Also a little caution and a little bigotry added to it.

Poor blacks were known for catching then in the canals and runoff basins,  where we don't want to know what was flowing through.  Bottom feeders  get a bad rap.

 

 

N Atlantic Bluefish,  now there is some good eating - if you like fish, if you can get them fresh.

post #38 of 63

Depends where you're from, macdoodle, as there are some rather distinct regional differences.

 

In Massachusetts, for instance, they generally love blues; it's one of the favorites among Baystaters. But almost next door, in Maine, they think of them as trashfish, and will only eat them under extreme duress.

 

The overall problem with oily fish like blues, mackeral, etc. is that Americans, as a group, do not like fish. That's why tilapia has become so popular. So they shy away from strong tasting fish. Which pretty much describes much of the ocean's bounty.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #39 of 63

If you live inland like I do (MN) freshwater delicate tasting fish are the norm. Walleye and northern pike are very popular along with panfish and catfish.

post #40 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post

If you live inland like I do (MN) freshwater delicate tasting fish are the norm. Walleye and northern pike are very popular along with panfish and catfish.



   Hi Mary!

 

   I went on a recent trip to Canada (Pickerel Creek) with my brothers, friend and father.  It was a great trip.  Now...I have eaten my fair share of fresh fish and Walleye has always been my favorite.  The Walleye in the Canadian waters were even better than what I caught/ate here.  But the fish I was surprised the most with was the Northern Pike.  I've eaten it before, down here, and would have never given it a second thought.  But I have to say...the Northern Pike we caught and ate in Canada was some of the best fish I've ever eaten.  

 

Who knew?  I didn't...and wouldn't have thought so.

 

   But, I've had enough experience with other animals having different habitat and feed which changed the flavor.  Ain't life grand :)

 

 

 

My point to people...

 

  You may not like catfish.  But give it a try from different waters in different areas.

 

 

Dan

post #41 of 63

Lets ask the brother of that huge catfish i he like eating humans?

 

post #42 of 63
post #43 of 63

not all catfish are the same, I love blue catfish.....had some a couple weeks ago at a mushroom foray was incredible! mud cat and channel cat can be well muddy

but I'll bypass farmed every day...don't care for the texture nor lack of flavor.

 

If you are ever driving down HWY 55 in southern Louisiana and see Middendorfs restaurant in Akers or on Bayou Manchac stop in for some outrageous fried catfish  "thin or thick"....

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #44 of 63

I'm from NYC originally so I'm not really up on Catfish, but I treat it like flounder. Sometimes I simmer it in some fresh marinara with some mushrooms and serve with some rustric bread. Quick weekday meal that is pretty satisfying. I love fried catfish too though. 

post #45 of 63

I live in the Pacific Northwest, with Cod, Halibut and Salmon why would I ever say Catfish.................Chefbillyb

post #46 of 63

I never much liked catfish when I used to catch it as a boy in Illinois. As others have noted, the river stuff could often have a "muddy" flavor. But I really enjoy the farm-raised catfish I can now buy at the market.

 

My favorite prep comes from Mississippi's best known food writer, Craig Claiborne, and is as simple as they come. Just smear the fillets with a coating of yellow mustard (this is not a place for Dijon!) and roll them in seasoned corn meal (salt, pepper, and optional ground thyme or a bit of cayenne), and fry them in a bit of vegetable oil until golden brown on both sides. The corn meal forms a crisp shell that seals in moisture and absorbs very little fat in the process. I like lemon wedges with this. 

 

My wife, not a fan of fried fish, loves it as do I.

post #47 of 63

Some of the best fish I've ever had has been the sarandeado at Martin's No. 2, on Valley Blvd., in La Puente (SoCal).  The waitresses say huachinango (red snapper), but it's basa -- a kind of Vietnamese catfish -- without a doubt.  Sarandeado is a sort of very spicy barbecue.   Martin's uses basa for all their filetes too, mojo de ajo, al diablo, etc., which are essentially sauteed and sauced, and the fish works as well for those.

 

Buffalo and Channel Cat at the U-Buy We Fry stores, count me as a huge fan 

 

And I get good results cooking cat in all sorts of ways -- sauteed, grilled, hot-smoked, fried (including fried ala Fish&Chips).  Not cold smoking, though.  Doubt that would work very well.

 

BDL

 

 

 

 

What were we talking about?
 
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post #48 of 63

if you compare the habits of catfish it equals a lobster. I was raised on catfish and even helped to catch it.  catfish filet is a great treat.

post #49 of 63

Not necessarily, Willie. There are something like 400 catfish species, worldwide, some of which are bottom feeding scavengers, and some of which are very aggressive predators.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #50 of 63

Well you are right forgive my what seemed a short comment.  They are very aggressive which is why I do not wish to try and catch any catfish in the future.  I forget sometimes my childhood memories are blurred with food nostalgia. But you are indeed right about the personality of a catfish.  That being said I like both lobster and catfish!

post #51 of 63

That certainly made a point!

post #52 of 63

I do love to eat cat like in catfishpeace.gif

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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post #53 of 63

I like farm raised variety. Fresh wild caught for me and my taste a bit to fishy and oily.  I only like it deep fried or black pan sauteed.  Others may like it otherways.

CHEFED
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post #54 of 63

That is a serious looking catfish. Looks like the ones in the Arkansas Rive at Little Rock.

post #55 of 63

One of the most eaten fish in Brazil, personally... I hate, not because it`s taste is bad, it`s good, but it`s heavy and have to cook heavy meats, I like light fish.

700

post #56 of 63

I am really not a fan of Catfish. I find warm fresh water seafood bland.
 

post #57 of 63

You want good catfish try Swai,farm raised from Vietnam. It is the best catfish you will ever have.
 

post #58 of 63

What one man finds bland, another finds subtle in taste, Derrick wink.gif

 

Though, seriously, I can't comment on the American variety. I do like the European catfish, preferably wild-caught. It is probably an altogether different species. They are fun to catch, too - great fighters. It's called Wels here. No bottom feeder, but a predator.

post #59 of 63

Catfish Scare me! Too many bones and their heads are soooo big! I do not like them blackened...I do not like them any way at all! giggles....

post #60 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom421 View Post

You want good catfish try Swai,farm raised from Vietnam. It is the best catfish you will ever have.
 

it also shares some of the same stigma that anything farm raised has, not to mention, it's garbage fish like tilapia. If you see how swai are raised and farmed, you wouldn't be quick to endorse 'em.

~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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~If you are what you eat, I am cheap, fast, and easy.

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