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Cheese popovers

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

So I've been making cheese popovers lately. I use a basic popover recipe (1 cup milk, 1 cup flour, 2 eggs, some salt) with pretty good success. I grate some cheese anc mix it with some hot cajun seasoning.

 

Then I pour half the batter into the baking pan, top with seasoned cheese and add the rest of the batter. This was the recommended method from Joy of Cooking  (I think it was JoC anyway).

 

And it works, but they don't pop nearly as well and they seem to suffer from the interrupted batter pour.

 

So I'm wondering what anyone else may have done successfully with a cheese popover. I'm thinking I'll grind the cheese finely in the food processor and mix it in the batter but have concerns it will settle during pouring and baking for uneven cheese distribution.

 

post #2 of 12

Haven't made any popovers in quite a while, but here is what I do. Don't try to break up the cheese into the batter, just mix it enough to avoid clumps. I find that using the largest grater size I have and trying for a good length of grated cheese allows for good cheese veins in the popover or cornbread when I do it.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #3 of 12

I've always mixed the cheese into the batter, Phil. Never had any problems with it.

 

Because the secret of popovers is pouring the batter into hot oil, I suspect you are right. It's the interrupted pour that's causing the problem.

 

Here's the basic recipe I use:

 

2/3 cup all purpose flour

1/4 tsp salt

1/3 cup milk

1/3 cup water

2 eggs

1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese

1 tbls (approx) shortening

 

Preheat oven to 375F. Put about 3/4 teaspoon shortening in each of six large muffin tins or popover molds. Preheat tins in oven, on a baking sheet.

 

Combine the flour and salt in a bowl. Gradually add the milk and water and blend well. Beat in eggs until smooth. Fold in the cheese.

 

Working quickly, remove pan of cups from oven. Fill 1/2-2/3 with batter. Return to oven. Bake 45-50 minutes until puffed and golden. Resist the impulse to open the oven door to check on how they are doing!

 

Warning: These are very addictive. Bet you can't eat just one!

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 12

Are these kind of cheesy 'Yorkshire puddings'?

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Quite similar though bigger, more puff.

post #6 of 12

What do you serve them with?

 

I'm used to making Yorkies for roast dinners, eg beef, lamb and pork.  Or, as the batter for toad in the hole.

post #7 of 12

Basic difference Yorki the way I always did it was placed in Au Jus for a while and served with the roast where Popover is served dry with anything . As a bread course in a basket

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 12

I've had great success with making the batter in a blender earlier in the day and allowing the batter to set in the blender container in the fridge for an hour or two before baking. I agree with the hot oil, either being prime rib grease or butter. I found no discernible problems with adding grated cheese to the batter. 

post #9 of 12

I didn't even know these existed.  Imagine my happiness!  Thanks for the recipe KY.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 12

Wait'll you try 'em, KK. In addition to being delicious they are mostly air. Which lets you indulge guilt-free.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Buchanan View Post

Basic difference Yorki the way I always did it was placed in Au Jus for a while and served with the roast where Popover is served dry with anything . As a bread course in a basket



Here,  Yorkshire pudding is served o the plate with the meat - and you add your gravy to the complete plate, eg after adding your veggies and roasts!  Otherwise, it's all soggy on the bottom.  Interestingly, in certain areas of the UK (including Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, it is served with an onion gravy BEFORE the meat/veg course - legend says this was to fill you up before you got your meagre portion of roast meat!)

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm planning on a few batches this afternoon for  a gathering this evening. I'll let you know results.

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