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Roasting Pans

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

 

Seeing that Thanksgiving is around the corner (more so for us Canadians), I'd like to get some feedback on roasting pans. My preference would be for stainless steel over non-stick since one could deglaze, but is there a risk of burning the drippings because roasting takes a few hours? Also, what's the consensus on covers; use or not to use (reduces splatter but does it also drastically caramelization)?

 

Best,

Randy

post #2 of 12

Start with enough liquid in the pan so that it doesn't all evaporate before enough fat gets there from the turkey to keep the drippings from burning.  A bottle of inexpensive (but drinkable) white wine is good.  Put some big pieces of carrots and celery and onions down there too. 

 

Why would anyone want a non-stick roasting pan?!

 

No lid.  That's a different sort of pan anyway.  You don't want a high sided, oval "turkey roaster."  You want a regular, low sided roasting pan -- the kind that usually comes with a rack.  You'll get tons of use from it all year long, too.

 

You may choose to use foil if you like for part of the roast in order to protect the skin (?!) and preserve moisture.  However...

 

The three best ways to get a moist bird are to:  1)  Buy a good, fresh bird to begin with -- no "Butterballs".  2) Brine.  And, 3) Don't overcook.  In order of importance -- 3, 1, 2.

 

Also, if your bird isn't too big, not stuffed, is appropriately trussed, you have the room, etc., etc., turning the bird from side up to back up, to other side up, and finishing breast up, with back up being the longest part of the cooking process, will make a big difference in how evenly the bird cooks and not overcooking the breast.  You don't really want to expose it any more than is necessary than to get crisp skin.

 

Finally, unless there's someone in your family who not only wants to carve the turkey but actually possesses sharp knives and knows how -- don't try to carve the bird at the table.  Do it in the kitchen, and do it "the new way." That means, among other things, removing each entire half breast from the ribs as a single piece, and laying them flat on the board before carving.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/8/10 at 2:43pm
post #3 of 12

So riddle me this, Boar.

 

How come if you, or I, or anyone in the Cheftalk community brines a bird its a great move. But when Swift or Armour do it it's evil?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 12

Not much of a riddle. 

 

The big boys, like Swift, Armour, etc., don't brine, they pump (aka inject).  In itself, no great evil, but then you have to look at what they pump which isn't just salt, water, sugar, wine, juice, and aromatics.  But even if you have no problems with that, they use factory farmed birds from the worst factories. 

 

And even then, it's not a go directly to perdition do not pass go problem.  At least not for me. 

 

But, CT is oriented towards people who want to do the best job they can, not just warm something up.  Starting with a mass-produced turkey gives up control over some of the most important parts of the process in favor of a level of convenience this audience (including me) doesn't seek. 

 

In any case, knowing how doesn't mean you hafta.

 

BDL

post #5 of 12

Bottom line reason they pump in my opinion is to add water weight to the bird . They go up to 18% which means 18 cents on your dollar spent is for water therefore their bottom line profit. BDL states it nicely. Me ? I just call them thieves. If possible do not use stainless steel

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Buchanan View Post
If possible do not use stainless steel

Hi Ed, I'm curious as to why you recommend against stainless steel for a roasting pan? And what else would you recommend over stainless steel? Aluminum?
 

post #7 of 12

Stainless warps.........

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #8 of 12

Not only does stainless warp it also s a terrible conductor of even heat. Some parts of the pan get extremely hot, others not. Food also has a tendency due to this uneven heat to burn and stick in some areas and not in others. The best roast pan in mine and a lot of other guys opinion are the old black steel pans with a handle on both ends. They last for years, and due to their color makes meat  color quicker. They are perfect height about 3 1/2 inches. and weight and can hold a large turkey or roast. Second choice aluminum.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 12

Where do you get these black steel roasting pans?  I've never seen one and I would like to try it.

post #10 of 12

Ed, foodpump.. thanks for the answers!

post #11 of 12

At some rest. supply or equipment places or at rest. auctions. Note they will not fit in a home oven either reg or wall. commercial size only.

 

Leaving Thursday for a 10 day cruise to Panama Canal see evreyone when I get back  EDB


Edited by chefedb - 10/11/10 at 1:40pm

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #12 of 12

In line with Ed's comment, full-sized roasting pans, sheet pans, etc. are designed to fit an oven that is a minimum of 36 inches wide. Most home ovens are only 30 inches, so, if using professional equipment, you need half sizes; i.e., half-sheets, etc.

 

If you shop at a restaurant supply store, explain the the salesman what you're looking for, and he'll guide you to the right stuff.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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