or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › How long do (chocolate) truffles last at room temperature?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How long do (chocolate) truffles last at room temperature?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hello there!

Soooo, basically I have a question about chocolate truffles. I went to chef school, although after taking the basic and advanced pastry arts program that went with it, I realize that I love things like candy making and chocolate making a lot more than cooking. I've always been really artsy and creative, and I find that the pastry arts challenge this side a lot more than cooking...

In my little town, there is a candy shop, mostly retail - they get their chocolates in from other places, and they sell pretty gifts, gourmet foods, and nostalgic candies... and I have started making gelato for them during the Summer. Right now we are into the Autumn, and so now I get to play with all sorts of chocolate. We mostly just do barks, bars, and dipped things, though. But I want to do more! Me and the boss-lady have some pretty close ties, so I know that if I ask her to make truffles, she'll totally be all ears for it - she's fairly open minded.

The store is a nice temperature - not too warm, nice and cool so all the chocolate doesn't melt. So if I were to make truffles, using cream in the ganache mixture and dipping the chocolates, as well as any other variants using cream, how long would these truffles last in the chocolate display at room temperature? Refrigeration isn't an option in the front of the store - only in the back, in the kitchen.

Also, if I were to use butter, would that decrease the shelf time, too? I would love if I could get some advice from folks who have candy shops. smile.gif


 

post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by monsterkookies View Post

Hello there!

 how long would truffles last? smile.gif


 



3 seconds...from the plate to the lips.  sorry,  just couldn't resist...I love truffles!!

"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
Reply
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
Reply
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amazingrace View Post





3 seconds...from the plate to the lips.  sorry,  just couldn't resist...I love truffles!!


Hahaahaha! Same here! I'm kind of scared to make them... I may eat them all.

post #4 of 15

A lot of different factors going on.

Tempering the chocolate will help extend it's shelf life (been there and done that)

 

For me, making the ganache and flavoring it, scooping and rolling then dipping is an art form and I make them each year at work for the annual Christmas party. I make several different kinds. I make them, then refrigerate them. At room temperature I would think those babies would be very fragile at best. I wish I could be more help but my truffles never last long enough to find out how long their shelf life is.

post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by amazingrace View Post





3 seconds...from the plate to the lips.  sorry,  just couldn't resist...I love truffles!!


Heh heh.  smile.gif

post #6 of 15

My mom and I have made straight up ganache truffles for years- ganache balls rolled in coconut, nuts, or cocoa powder. We've kept them for several days in tupperware with no ill effects. Hope this helps!

 

-Becky

post #7 of 15

At room temperature or slighly cooler---2-3 weeks max.

 

In ganaches, your #1 enemy is water, or more specifically water activity.  Cream is amost 2/3 water, chocolate contains no water, after 3 weeks it will spoil.  Butter, on the other hand contains only about 18% water, so the shelf life for butter ganaches is longer.

 

You can succesfully freeze truffles or any other chocolate confection with excellent results.

 

BUT, the items must be vacuum packed, refrigerated for one day, then frozen.  Two days before opening the package, place the frozen package in the fridge for 1 day, then at room temp for one day, then open.  Done  like this you will get no "sugar bloom" or condensation forming on the chocolate tha would dissolve the sugar in the chocolate, and when it dries, it gives it that yucky streaky grey film.

 

In my shop I sell around 25 varities of truffles, bon-bons, and other confections, with close to 1/3 having a shelf life of under 3 weeks.  Customers and sales staff must be made aware of this.  This has good points and bad points, but it is also what separates you from the $9.00 drugstore box of chocolates.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

THANKS for your input, guys! It helped a lot. smile.gif

post #9 of 15


 Quote:

Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

At room temperature or slighly cooler---2-3 weeks max.

 

In ganaches, your #1 enemy is water, or more specifically water activity.  Cream is amost 2/3 water, chocolate contains no water, after 3 weeks it will spoil.  Butter, on the other hand contains only about 18% water, so the shelf life for butter ganaches is longer.

 

You can succesfully freeze truffles or any other chocolate confection with excellent results.

 

BUT, the items must be vacuum packed, refrigerated for one day, then frozen.  Two days before opening the package, place the frozen package in the fridge for 1 day, then at room temp for one day, then open.  Done  like this you will get no "sugar bloom" or condensation forming on the chocolate tha would dissolve the sugar in the chocolate, and when it dries, it gives it that yucky streaky grey film.

 

In my shop I sell around 25 varities of truffles, bon-bons, and other confections, with close to 1/3 having a shelf life of under 3 weeks.  Customers and sales staff must be made aware of this.  This has good points and bad points, but it is also what separates you from the $9.00 drugstore box of chocolates.

 

Hi,


How do you vacuum truffles? Do you use a chamber vacuum machine?

I would like to vacuum hard shell truffles/pralines, but I think they would be crushed during the process.
 

Thanks,

Omar

 

post #10 of 15

You can use a vacuum chamber, but I don't. 

 

The idea is to remove as much air out of the bag as possible without crushing the truffles.  I used to use a foodsaver machine, but when it was time to get new bags, I found a better alternative:  At the hardware store I found a sytem of heavy duty plastic bags with a one way valve and a zipper, and a hand operated pump--much like a bicycle pump.  The bags can be used over and over again, and the pump fits over the valve.  You have excellent control of how much air you remove before crushing the truffles.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #11 of 15

I see a lot of responses to the truffles lasting at room temperature.

 

So, my question is:  If I make a no-bake cookie truffle with butter or a truffle that has eggs + butter, I can leave them out for about 2 weeks?

 

I want to ship some to my aunt in Chicago (I live in Boston) and dont want them to spoil due not being refrigerated - it may take about a week to ship.  Just dont want them to go bad before they would get there.

 

I have truffles that I would make with buttercream - I know those have to stay refrigerated due to the ingredients  that are perishable.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by armyguy368 View Post

I see a lot of responses to the truffles lasting at room temperature.

 

So, my question is:  If I make a no-bake cookie truffle with butter or a truffle that has eggs + butter, I can leave them out for about 2 weeks?

 

 

I think that really depends on what the formulation of you recipe is. A cream ganache can definitely last, and the same for a butter ganache. If a ganache center contains alcohol, then that adds to the shelf life. Are you making an actual ganache? It sort of sounds like your making something more along the lines of a no bake cookie bar. Whats your recipe look like?

post #13 of 15

Uhh...no.

 

Alcohol does not increase shelf life.

 

Look, lets say you use a 80 proof booze.  What this means is that 80 proof is 40% alcohol content.  True, 100% booze will preserve anything, but 40% booze contains 60% water, and this water will do nothing to increase shelf life.

 

If you want to increase shelf life you have to remove as much water as possible.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #14 of 15

Here is the receipe:

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/2 cup semisweet mini chocolate morsels
  • 1 cup finely chopped pecans or walnuts
  • 1 1/2 pounds chocolate bark candy coating, melted

 

Its the butter that Im worried about, when shipping to Chicago since it will probably take a week to get there. (Dont want to ship overnight, since its very expensive).

post #15 of 15

I have the same predicament as you. I'm wanting to send some buttercream truffles and mince pies to family in Florida. What I'm doing is purchasing the truffle trays and liners and boxes (already done). Then I will put the truffles in the boxes, wrap the boxes in plastic (zip loc). Suck all the air out (you can use a straw). Wrap in plastic wrap, then put in a small inner box lined with foil with a few ice packs surrounding it. It'll stay protected from condensation inside the zip loc bag (hopefully) and will stay chilled for at least a day or two. Long enough to mostly get to FL in one piece from KY. I'll also have other things in the box and I'll be lining the entire inside of the box with foil and a bit of bubble wrap to help insulate it even further. A company I know called Jolly Grub also sells thermal packaging with their foods if you buy it for $5. You can always purchase something small and get their thermal packaging. lol.

 

Now my main concern is whether I can successfully freeze buttercream filled Belgian style truffles as well as French style ganache truffles! I'm going to take them from room temp, to fridge, to freezer, but I'm not quite sure what to do after that. Any other tips on that, folks?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › How long do (chocolate) truffles last at room temperature?