ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Let's make "pesto Americano"!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Let's make "pesto Americano"!! - Page 3

post #61 of 75
Thread Starter 

KYH, we have only one word for squash/pumpkin; pompoen. I would guess 99% of the people I know that use it, put it only in soup and -of course- only in wintertime.

Well, as I said, "pompoen" in any form looks very American to us!

 

Pete, thanks! The second recipe seems nice with very surprising ingredients. Well, I love amaretti, the crunchy ones. The suggestion to use that pesto on scallops is however a big "no" for me. Fish/seafood and sugar is not my taste.

post #62 of 75

Chef B, you are correct. It was a typo, and should have read Connecticutt- or Long-Island Cheese pumpkins. Don't know how that happened.

 

The Flat Tan is a Kentucky heirloom, and is very similar to the Long Island Cheese. It wouldn't surprise me if somebody did some Dna scanning to find that all, or at least most, of the cheese types are only one or two varieties. They're just too similar to be truly different. I

 

I'll have a bucketful of seed for the KY Flat Tan, if you want to try growing it. It's incredibly prolific---four hills produced about 50 fruit, running from 7.5 to about 25 pounds (I haven't harvest the larger ones, yet, so am guessing at the weight). Contact me privately if you're interested.

 

I never thought of the sweet potato squashes as part of the cushaw group, nor do any of my references list them that way. And with the establishment of the mixta/mochata crosses as a separate species (C. argyrosperma) it's gotten even more confusing. For instance Sweet Potato Pumpkin is still listed as C. maxima. The cushaws, along with Kentucky Sweet Potato & Tennessee Sweet Potato are now C. argyrosperma. But Sweet Potato squash remains  listed as C. moschata. How much of this is true reclassification, and how much is attributable to poor taxonomic keying, deponent sayeth not.

 

I was going to suggest the Red Kuri as a good pie "pumpkin" as well, but figured I'd already lost most readers when I said there was no such thing as a pumpkin.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #63 of 75

I suppose it's a bit like the way 'turnip' is used in different parts of the UK.

 

It is and it's not, Ishbell.

 

With turnips we're talking about regionally different names for the same vegetable. As you point out, in the U.S. it's mostly called "rutabaga." But in some parts of the U.S., and in Europe, it's called a "Swedish Turnip." I've always thought that the British term, "Swede," was merely a contracted form of that.

 

With pumpkins the confusion goes deeper, because there is no such thing, horticulturally speaking, as a pumpkin. So the term---which dates from colonial days, when Europeans coming to the new world called all squashes "pompions"---is applied to a vast number of hard-skinned squashes. Most usually these are round, orange ones. But, as we've seen, that isn't always the case.

 

Contributing to the confusion: Very similar names for different varieties. You may have noticed, for instance, in my last reply to ChefBazookas, that there is both a Sweet Potato Pumpkin, and a Sweet Potato squash on the list. Those two actually are different species.

 

As a matter of historical interest,  the model used for Cinderella's coach was a large French variety, which, while generally ovoid, is slightly flattened.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #64 of 75

 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

 

As a matter of historical interest,  the model used for Cinderella's coach was a large French variety, which, while generally ovoid, is slightly flattened.



It's funny you should mention Cinderella's coach.  I just made a model myself for an American Cancer Society fundraiser.  I've been on the ACS's Relay For Life committee for three years and we've done this Pink Pumpkin Project fundraiser twice.  I had the best time both years making my pink pumpkin entry.  I was notably not accurate with regard to the original model, but I think it worked out pretty well.  The kids at the event seemed to enjoy it.

pink pumpkin front.jpg

 pink pumpkin driver.jpgpink pumpkin back.jpg

I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
Reply
I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
Reply
post #65 of 75

Wow! That's gorgeous! How long did it take you?

 

Can you imagine if you'd actually used a Vif d'Etampes. It would take two men and a small boy to move it.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #66 of 75

Hey guys just a friendly nudge to keep on the topic. This thread is getting way to long and it looks like it is straying into other topics that would be better suited to a unique thread/disussion. Thanks.

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #67 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

Hey guys just a friendly nudge to keep on the topic. This thread is getting way to long and it looks like it is straying into other topics that would be better suited to a unique thread/disussion. Thanks.

Huh? Pesto and Pumpkin both start with P, for goodness sake!
 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #68 of 75

BTW, my regular computer is down, so, here's the link to the WSJ article about pesto alternatives:

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304772804575558530945273878.html?mod=WSJ_LifeStyle_Lifestyle_6

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #69 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

Wow! That's gorgeous! How long did it take you?

 

Can you imagine if you'd actually used a Vif d'Etampes. It would take two men and a small boy to move it.



I see Nicko's nudge and raise him one this-is-the-last-off-topic-post-on-this-thread.

 

It only took me about 8 hours over two evenings.  I'm not sure I'd wanted to carve up a V d'E.  I didn't mind with this one.

 

But back to pesto.  I like it traditional and generously applied to my favorite panini - caprese. smile.gif

I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
Reply
I don't like food, I love it.  If I don't love it, I don't swallow.
Reply
post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick View Post


Pesto is green like spinach but when most people think of a pesto, the green, granular sauce that comes to mind is traditionally made with basil, pine nuts, olive oil, and a hard cheese (Parmesan, etc).  So the "spinach-ness" has no relation to the "pesto-ness" of the sauce.  Hope that clears it up.



Thanks for the explanation. Just confuse with that sauce because, I just know only one. smile.gif Thanks again.

post #71 of 75

yeah, gunnar, pine nuts are the ideal nut for me but they are like gold

post #72 of 75

thanks for the pesto link pete...surprised no one has mentioned chimichurri, which to me is more a pesto than a sauce, at least i make it in the same fashion.....

btw, i like old, opinionated and crochety!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #73 of 75

didn't exactly know where to post this, but i think i remember some talk here about how there is really no real 'american' food...that everything originates from another culture...well...i don't think anyone else but us americans could have come up with the Krispy Kreme bacon cheeseburger!!...road trip food signs on our trip from colorado to southern arizona....second hand thrift store and meat processing(maybe its where lady gaga got her 'meat' dress...on an ice cream kiosk...parfay...in the navajo nation an A& W's hand painted sign  "all american food" with hand painted ice cream cones, burgers and fries...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #74 of 75

I made it, it is just delicious, better than italian!;))

post #75 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrnmarius View Post

I made it, it is just delicious, better than italian!;))



 What did you make?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Let's make "pesto Americano"!!